Hide Advanced Options
Courses - Summer 2019
AASP
African American Studies Department Site
AASP100
Introduction to African American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: SH, D
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Significant aspects of the history of African Americans with particular emphasis on the evolution and development of black communities from slavery to the present. Interdisciplinary introduction to social, political, legal and economic roots of contemporary problems faced by blacks in the United States with applications to the lives of other racial and ethnic minorities in the Americas and in other societies.
AASP101
Public Policy and the Black Community
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: SB
GenEd: DSHS
Formerly: AASP300.
The impact of public policies on the black community and the role of the policy process in affecting the social, economic and political well-being of minorities. Particular attention given to the post-1960 to present era.
AASP202
Black Culture in the United States
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: SH, D
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
The course examines important aspects of African American life and thought which are reflected in African American literature, drama, music and art. Beginning with the cultural heritage of slavery, the course surveys the changing modes of black creative expression from the 19th-century to the present.
AASP211
Get Out: The Sunken Place of Race Relations in the Post-Racial Era
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: AASP298G or AASP211.
Formerly: AASP298G.
Prevailing thought suggests that we live in an era that is post-racial, particularly after the election of Barack Obama. Media often serves to drive our assessment of where our nation stands on issues like race, gender and sexuality. This course uses the film Get Out to delve into the production, evolution and significance of race in present day America. The course will engage multiple forms of media to investigate life in "Post-Racial" America, including but not limited to the role of stereotypes, interracial relationships, police-community relations, etc.
AASP498E
Special Topics in Black Culture; A Critical Understanding of Hip Hop Culture and its Impact on Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
A critical exploration of Hip Hop and how it transcends race, socioeconomic background, culture, and gender.
AASP498I
Special Topics in Black Culture; Women and the Civil Rights Movement
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Also offered as HIST360 and WMST498M. Credit granted for AASP498I, HIST360 or WMST498M.
AASP498M
Special Topics in Black Culture; Black Masculinity in Mass Media: How Blackness has formed (and Re-formed) in U.S. Entertainment Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
AASP498R
Special Topics in Black Culture; Race and Sports
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
A web-based class which uses print media and film to investigate the relationship between two issues that play a large rolein American society--race and sports. All lectures, readings and assignments will be available via Blackboard. If there are questions, please contact the instructor at jenglan1@umd.edu.
AASP498Z
Special Topics in Black Culture; Black Women in Popular Culture: From the Blues to Beyonce'
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Students will develop a broad understand of African American women in popular culture through the study of a variety of cultural forms such asliterary texts, films, documentaries, visual art and novels. Students will develop an understanding of the connections between African American womens cultural forms and the historical contexts our of which these cultural traditions arose.
AASP499F
Advanced Topics in Public Policy and the Black Community; Black Politics and Policy: A Multimedia Approach
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
This is an online course that uses media (films like 12 Years a Slave, Boyz N the Hood and Do the Right Thing and documentaries) and primary documents to investigate African-American politics in thepost-Civil Rights Era and policy issues such as education, the prison industrial complex and welfare. Please contact the instructor at jenglan1@umd.edu for more information.