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Courses - Fall 2019
PLCY
Public Policy
PLCY388
(Perm Req)
Special Topics in Public Policy
Credits: 1 - 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
PLCY388A
Special Topics in Public Policy; Child and Family Policy Impact
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Jointly offered with FMSC498P. Credit only granted for PLCY388A or FMSC4 98P. For poor and low-income families, federal programs such as Medicaid , Child care, SNAP and child nutrition programs are a lifeline every day. Some programs also have policies that consider more than income eligibility, such as number of hours of work, disability, and immigration status. Budget choices have a significant impact on pol icy intentions. Students will learn about and analyze the major federal programs and federal budgets for these policy areas; understand fro m data the impact of such programs and policies; and be introduced to significant advocacy efforts and considerations that shaped hese po licy decisions.
PLCY388D
Special Topics in Public Policy; Innovation and Social Change: Do Good Now
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Introduces students to the concept of social innovation while exploring the many mechanisms for achieving social impact. It is team-based, highly interactive and dynamic, and provides an opportunity for students to generate solutions to a wide range of problems facing many communities today. Deepens the students understanding of entrepreneurship and innovation practices by guiding them through the creation and implementation process as applied to a project idea of their choice.
PLCY388E
Special Topics in Public Policy; Controversial Issues in Education Reform
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Cross-listed with EDUC388E. Credit granted for PLCY388E or EDUC388E.
PLCY388G
Special Topics in Public Policy; Global Perspectives on Leading and Investing in Social Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Today, philanthropic and nonprofit organizations play significant roles in shaping how public policy gets developed and implemented, as well as how change occurs in society. This course will define philanthropy as an exploration of how one develops a vision of the public good and then how a person or group can deploy resources to achieve a positive and lasting impact. During the semester, the class will go through the challenging and exciting process of ultimately granting approximately $7,500 to an organization that we believe can use these resources to achieve an impact on an issue of international significance. Our class grant deliberations and decisions will ultimately lead us to confront, question, and sharpen our philanthropic values, decisions, and leadership skills.
PLCY388M
Special Topics in Public Policy; Homeland Security and World Order
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Protecting the Nation's homeland security involves the careful integration of many agencies' efforts and resources- both human and material. An important dynamic element in policy making is the significance of American Federalism to the national division of labor addressing security problems. Our federal structure creates unique prohibitions on the use of federal power, but also facilitates experimentation in meeting critical security and emergency preparedness requirements. This course will anchor the exploration of homeland security policy in an appreciation of America's federal history, and address responses to threats and challenges from critical infrastructure cybersecurity to counter terrorism and securing the US' borders and littoral economic interests.
PLCY388N
Special Topics in Public Policy; The United States and Israel: Likely or Unlikely Allies?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Cross-listed with ISRL329N and GVPT368B. Credit granted for ISRL329N, PLCY388N or GVPT368B.
PLCY388Q
Special Topics in Public Policy; Introduction to International Security
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
This course will familiarize students new to international security policy with major concepts, debates, and challenges in the field. Some of today's most important problems, including potential conflicts between great powers, violence by governments against their own people and by terrorist organizations, and the disruptive effects of powerful new technology have existed in various forms for centuries.
PLCY388T
(Perm Req)
Special Topics in Public Policy; Undergraduate Teaching Assistant Directed Study
Credits: 1 - 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud