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Courses - Spring 2022
ARTH
Art History & Archaeology Department Site
ARTH200
Art and Society in Ancient and Medieval Europe and the Mediterranean
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HA
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Examines the material culture and visual expressions of Mediterranean and European societies from early times until ca. 1300 CE, emphasizing the political, social, and religious context of the works studied, the relationships of the works to the societies that created them, and the interrelationship of these societies.
ARTH201
Art and Society in the West from the Renaissance to the Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HA
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Examines representative European and American works of art from the later Middle Ages to the present, highlighting the dynamic exchange between artistic and cultural traditions both within periods and across time.
ARTH265
How (and Why) to Look at Art in the Era of Climate Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ARTH265 or ARTH465.
Formerly: ARTH465.
How can art help us build the mindset necessary for fashioning a sustainable civilization? Paintings, photographs, films, novels, songs, and other creative works as they shape beliefs related to sustainability and justice.
ARTH301
Aegean Art and Archaeology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Sites and monuments of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor arts of Crete, the Cycladic islands, and the Greek mainland from the earliest times to the downfall of the Mycenaean empire.
ARTH313
Medieval Art: Cultural Exchanges in the Byzantine World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Recommended: ARTH200 or ARTH201.
Focuses on the art and architecture from the eastern Mediterranean, specifically, the Byzantine empire. Our broad focus will be on the formation and evolution of the visual arts in Byzantium as a result of exchanges with various cultural, ethnic, and religious entities and traditions. In this context, we will be looking at the legacy of the Graeco-Roman past, contacts with Islamic world, as well as with people and cultures along the periphery of Byzantium: from the Balkan peninsula, to Sicily and Russia.
ARTH324
Leonardo's World: Art and Experience in Renaissance Italy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Painting, sculpture, architecture, and the decorative arts of the sixteenth century in Italy.
ARTH359O
Film as Art; Film Gazes and Points of View
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
ARTH376
Living Art of Africa
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: D
Art styles among the segmentary, centralized, and nomadic people of Africa. The iconography and function of their art and its relationship to their various societies, cults and ceremonies.
ARTH386
Experiential Learning
Credits: 3 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Permission of ARHU-Art History & Archaeology department.
Restriction: Junior standing or higher.
Supervised internship experience in diverse areas of art historical, archaeological, and museological work.
Contact department for information to register for this course.
ARTH391
Transnational Chinese Cinema
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: CINE335.
Credit only granted for: ARTH391 or CINE335.
Chinese cinema has made a big impact on contemporary world film culture. This course will introduce students to the films directed by some of the most representative filmmakers working in different geopolitical locations (mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong) and the Chinese diaspora. The films of these directors, in a spectrum of genres, themes, and styles, have inspired global scholarship, not only in visual culture and cinema, but also in the study of women's issues, gender and ethnic studies, as well as the fields of adaptation and intermedia studies. Students will explore these films in their socio-historical and artistic contexts, considering the influences and innovations that have shaped them and analyzing their reception by audiences and critics. After reading about the films they view, and participating in class discussions, students will be ready to complete their analytical written assignments, for which they will critically examine the films by applying key concepts such as gender, sexuality, race, gaze, style, representation, power, diaspora, etc.
ARTH484
Modern Chinese Film and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Cross-listed with: CINE426.
Credit only granted for: ARTH484, CINE426 or FILM426.
Formerly: FILM426.
Modern Chinese culture, society, and history studied through examples of art, film, and visual culture.
Cinema is arguably the most influential global art form of the twentieth century. Within a year of its invention in the West, in 1896, it reached China, and since then has become an indispensable part of the social, political, and cultural life of the Chinese people. In this course, we will explore modern Chinese film and visual culture to examine topics such as modernity; tradition versus modernization; cultural nationalism; and Chinese responses to Western visual culture. We will examine works representative of Chinese film in both their local, Chinese context and that of worldwide cinema. We will consider how modern Chinese films and visual culture have been shaped by traditional Chinese aesthetic sensibilities and art forms as well as by foreign influences.
ARTH488D
Colloquium in Art History; Mining the Visual Culture of the Great Depression
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
During the Great Depression, economic crises, environmental disasters, and social movements transformed American life. This class focuses on the visual culture of this period from documentary photography and public murals to cinema and modern design. In addition to examining iconic works by artists like Dorothea Lange and Diego Rivera, we will engage local archives of photographs, posters, artist papers and other primary sources from the 1930s. Students in this seminar will not only explore a critical era in American visual culture but also reflect on how we form and use archives to shape our understanding of the past.
ARTH488M
Colloquium in Art History; African Modernism in America: Decolonization, Civil Rights and the Cold War
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
ARTH498
(Perm Req)
Directed Studies in Art History I
Credits: 2 - 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Contact department for information to register for this course.
ARTH499
(Perm Req)
Credits: 3 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Contact department for information to register for this course.
ARTH708G
Seminar in Ancient Art and Archaeology; Painting the Wine-Dark Sea: Mural Traditions in Bronze Greece
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud, S-F
This course explores the tradition of wall painting in Bronze Age Greece, ca. 3000-1100 BCE. Discussions will investigate murals in their archaeological and social contexts and consider larger questions of iconographic choice and transmission, tools and technology, color and and pigments, and the issues surrounding modern restorations and reconstructions.
ARTH768
Seminar in Latin American Art and Archaeology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud, S-F
ARTH779G
Seminar in Japanese Art; Art Worlds -- of Empire, War, and Occupation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud, S-F
The notion of an art world (gadan) has been central to the Japanese modern practice and conception of art. The art world was a site of conflict over inclusions and exclusions, authority and resistance, and collectivism and individualism. Conceived in relation to an international art world centered in Europe, the art world also responded to Japan's geopolitical engagement with other worlds : first, its growing Asian empire; in the Pacific War, its Allied enemies and Axis friends; and then, the new possibilities and limitations that came with defeat and American occupation. In this seminar we will trace the permutations of the art world over the course of roughly twenty-five tumultuous years, and examine, with a close focus on art objects and archival materials, the changing social role of art and the relationships that adhered between art, artist, and audience during this time of transformation.
ARTH789D
Selected Topics in Art History; At Home with Things
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
This seminar will look at objects in domestic settings during the early modern period, principally c. 1500-1650, considering the material nature of domesticit in England, The Netherlands, and Italy. Our exploration will cover rooms from kitchen to study, from bedroom to reception chamber. We will think about objects of use and objects for show, thingsthat are gifted between persons and things intensely personal to asingle individual, small things worn on the body and large things rootedin a specific household location. Objects that are mundane will beas important to our investigation as things that are rare and precious. We will consider things that are made at home by family members, and locally by craftsmen, but also things being imported from other parts ofthe globe and domesticized within the home. The storage, arrangement, and display of objects will also be important issues.
ARTH798
(Perm Req)
Directed Graduate Studies in Art History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
Contact department for information to register for this course.
ARTH799
(Perm Req)
Master's Thesis Research
Credits: 1 - 6
Grad Meth: S-F
Contact department for information to register for this course.
ARTH898
(Perm Req)
Pre-Candidacy Research
Credits: 1 - 8
Grad Meth: Reg
Contact department for information to register for this course.
ARTH899
(Perm Req)
Doctoral Dissertation Research
Credits: 6
Grad Meth: S-F
Contact department for information to register for this course.