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Courses - Spring 2024
CLAS
Classics Department Site
Open Seats as of
06/12/2024 at 10:30 AM
CLAS170
Ancient Myths and Modern Lives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Cross-listed with: RELS170.
Credit only granted for: CLAS170 or RELS170.
Additional information: This course cannot be taken for language credit.
What are myths and why do we tell them? What powers do myths have? We will tackle these questions by looking at the enduring and fascinating myths from ancient Greece and Rome. In addition to studying how they shaped ancient societies, we will also look at their modern influence and reflect upon the power that myths still hold in our contemporary world. Taught in English.
CLAS180
Discovering the World of Ancient Greece
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU
An exploration of the cultural traits and developments of ancient Greek civilization and its forerunners, from the Bronze Age Mycenaeans and Minoans, through the rise of the classical Greek city-states, to the expansion of Greek cultural influence in the wake of the conquests of Alexander the Great. Drawing upon the evidence of the archaeological remains as well as ancient historical and literary documents, students gain a basic familiarity with the principal monuments and artifacts of classical Greek civilization, the various institutions and values that characterized the Greeks, and the significant historical events that transformed the culture over the course of antiquity.
CLAS276
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: CLAS276 or CLAS289A.
Formerly: CLAS289A.
America, from its very origins as an independent nation, saw itself as the new Rome: its system of government is built on Roman precedents, its national buildings look as if they came from the Roman Forum, and its leisure activities take us to stadiums modeled on the Colosseum. America's relationship to Rome, however, raises its greatest anxiety: will America fall as Rome did? In 1776, the year of American independence, Edward Gibbon published his History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire; America has been thinking about the trajectory of its history alongside Rome's from the very beginning.
CLAS316
Classical Antiquity and the Cinema
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: CINE316.
Credit only granted for: CLAS316 or CINE316.
Many films, while rooted in the time and place in which they were created, draw upon themes and stories from ancient Greek and Roman literature. While the filmmakers' understandings of modern social forces affect their representations of the ancient world, the ancient works also shape the ways in which filmmakers tell their stories. Film criticism and close reading complement each other in the analysis of films and the ancient works on which they are based.
CLAS320
Women in Classical Antiquity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: HIST328W, WGSS320.
Credit only granted for: CLAS320, WMST320, WGSS320 or HIST328W.
A study of women's image and reality in ancient Greek and Roman societies through an examination of literary, linguistic, historical, legal, and artistic evidence; special emphasis in women's role in the family, views of female sexuality, and the place of women in creative art. Readings in primary sources in translation and modern critical writings.
CLAS321
Science & Society in Ancient Greece & Rome
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP
How did ancient Greek and Roman scientific practices differ from and resemble our own? How do we as historians recognize when someone is conducting scientific inquiry? What were the social and cultural contexts of scientific production in the ancient world? With a focus on the scientific practices and products of ancient Greeks and Romans from around the fifth century BCE to the second century CE, we investigate how several scientific disciplines -- including medicine, astronomy, and biology --developed under the influence of ancient social and cultural contexts, and how ancient literatures, in turn, were shaped by those working in scientific fields of inquiry. In addressing these questions special attention will be paid to the methods employed by the available sources of ancient scientists and the modes of demonstration, argumentation, and rhetoric employed in scientific texts. Readings of primary materials will be supplemented with selections of secondary scholarship.
CLAS322
Roman Freedpersons
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
The literary remains of three Roman freedpersons--the editor and biographer Tiro (c. 80-4 BCE), the poet and fabulist Phaedrus (fl. 1st cen. CE), and the philosopher Epictetus (c. 55-135 CE)--give us a rare glimpse into the internal experience of persons enslaved and emancipated by Roman elites. To contextualize these experiences, we study the legal basis of Roman slavery, epigraphic self-representations, and stereotyping representations of freedpersons by free authors. We also read our authors against comparable works by freeborn analogues--the senator Cicero, the poet Horace, and the philosopher Seneca--to test the boundaries of how the identity of libertus ("freedman") affected and failed to affect our authors' literary aims. To deepen our study of how historical conditions shape the creation of freed authorship and the transmission of freed authors, we also read, and consider the conditions surrounding the publication of, American freedpersons' literature.
CLAS340
Ancient Slavery and its American Impacts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: HIST339J.
Credit only granted for: CLAS340 or HIST339J.
Interrogates how slavery permeated the ancient Mediterranean societies of Greece and Rome. We will pay particular attention to how hierarchical inequalities are institutionalized, experienced, and represented and to how different marginalized and dominant groups interacted. Enslaved persons performed necessary labor in Greece and Rome and their work was essential for the formation of ancient society in agriculture, mining, domestic spaces, literature, finance, and government. Studying ancient slavery offers a chance to examine Greece and Rome from the bottom up, parsing the scant literary and material evidence for the lives and struggles of enslaved persons. We will practice several different approaches in order to tease out the systematic, economic, political, and personal effects of slavery in the ancient world. The United States of America was also founded as a slave society, and discussions of slavery in the Americas often look back to the ancient Mediterranean. The course will therefore conclude with a unit on how enslavers and abolitionists in the United States utilized and responded to slavery in antiquity.
CLAS499
(Perm Req)
Independent Study in Classical Languages and Literatures
Credits: 1 - 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Contact department for information to register for this course.
CLAS699
Independent Study in Classical Civilization
Credits: 1 - 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud