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Courses - Summer 2024
AASP
African American Studies Department Site
Open Seats as of
06/15/2024 at 08:30 AM
AASP100
Introduction to African American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Significant aspects of the history of African Americans with particular emphasis on the evolution and development of black communities from slavery to the present. Interdisciplinary introduction to social, political, legal and economic roots of contemporary problems faced by blacks in the United States with applications to the lives of other racial and ethnic minorities in the Americas and in other societies.
AASP101
Public Policy and the Black Community
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Formerly: AASP300.
The impact of public policies on the black community and the role of the policy process in affecting the social, economic and political well-being of minorities. Particular attention given to the post-1960 to present era.
AASP187
The New Jim Crow: African-Americans, Mass Incarceration and the Prison Industrial Complex
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Recommended: AASP100.
Students will examine the birth of the racial caste system following the abolition of slavery, the parallels between the racial hierarchy of the Jim Crow system and contemporary mass incarceration, and the rise of the prison industrial complex as a multi-billon business which thrives on the oppression of low-income populations and poor communities of color.
AASP211
Get Out: The Sunken Place of Race Relations in the Post-Racial Era
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: AASP298G or AASP211.
Formerly: AASP298G.
Prevailing thought suggests that we live in an era that is post-racial, particularly after the election of Barack Obama. Media often serves to drive our assessment of where our nation stands on issues like race, gender and sexuality. This course uses the film Get Out to delve into the production, evolution and significance of race in present day America. The course will engage multiple forms of media to investigate life in "Post-Racial" America, including but not limited to the role of stereotypes, interracial relationships, police-community relations, etc.
AASP230
Social (In)Justice and African-American Health and Well-Being
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
African Americans suffer worse outcomes than non-Hispanic whites on nearly every health measure and outcomes that link to overall well-being like depressive symptoms or homicides. Health disparities are experienced by other underrepresented minority groups, but because of the unique historic and current experiences of African Americans, the determinants and solutions to African American health disparities are unique. The premise of this course is that African American health disparities are due to social injustices perpetuated on the institutional level that have permeated the lived experiences of African Americans leading to racial disparities in health and well-being. As such, the solutions on the both policy, and community, level must have a social justice approach.
AASP298E
Special Topics in African American Studies; Reproductive Justice: An Introduction
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
AASP479A
Special Research in African-American Studies; Advanced Field Research in African American Politics
Credits: 1 - 9
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
This course is designed to guide students through the process of conducting advanced research on political and societal phenomena that impact the Black community. Students will receive hands-on experience conducting field experiments, deploying in-person and virtual surveys, conducting interviews and focus groups, and analyzing data.
AASP498E
Special Topics in Black Culture; A Critical Understanding of Hip Hop Culture and its Impact on Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
A critical exploration of Hip Hop and how it transcends race, socioeconomic background, culture, and gender.
AASP498I
Special Topics in Black Culture; Women and the Civil Rights Movement
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Also offered as HIST360 and WGSS498M. Credit granted for AASP498I, HIST360, or WGSS498M.
AASP498R
Special Topics in Black Culture; Race and Sports
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
This course delves into the multifaceted relationship between race, sport, and gender, exploring the historical and contemporary dynamics of race and sport. Students will examine how race and gender intersect with sport, challenging social norms and shaping political movements. Through the lens of critical race theory, we will analyze the role of athletes in addressing issues such as race, oppression, advocating for social justice, and politics. Topics include social justice movements in sports, the historical impact of race on sports, the impact of Name, Image & Likeness on Black student-athletes, and real-life stories of collegiate and professional athletes, illustrating the cultural agency of Black athletes amidst ongoing racial oppression in sports. The course integrates Critical Race Theory and Critical Sports Studies to deepen understanding of race, gender, sports, and social activism.
AASP498Z
Special Topics in Black Culture; Black Women in Popular Culture: From the Blues to Beyonce
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Black women are often hidden figures in American culture. However, from rap and pop music to films and novels, Black womens creative contributions to popular culture has been immense. To understand Black women's cultural contributions is to understand American history because Black women's history is American history. This course uses films such as Lemonade and Eves Bayou, and music by Billie Holiday and Sexyy Redd to explore how Black women have created their own identities and cultural forms while also reshaping the landscape of American popular culture. This class will discuss Black Identity, Black love, Black intergenerational trauma and healing, cultural appropriation, feminism, the Black family, respectability politics, colorism, as well as race and social media discourse.