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Courses - Summer 2024
SOCY
Sociology Department Site
Open Seats as of
06/15/2024 at 09:30 AM
SOCY100
Introduction to Sociology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Introduces fundamental concepts and theories of sociology. Guided by C. Wright Mills' "sociological imagination," the course promotes critical thinking; challenges conventional assumptions about culture politics, history, and psychology; and equips students with theoretical approaches and research methods to analyze various sociological topics, including family, work, education, religion, social movements, and issues related to class, gender, race, and ethnic inequalities.
SOCY201
Introductory Statistics for Sociology
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: FSAR
Prerequisite: SOCY100; and (MATH107 or MATH111).
Restriction: Must not have completed STAT400, BMGT231, or ENEE324.
Students will explore descriptive and inferential statistics. You will hone your quantitative analytical skills to construct impactful bivariate tables, craft frequency distributions, and decipher measures of central tendency and dispersion. Additionally, you will master the techniques of hypothesis testing, chi-square, ANOVA, and ordinary least squares regression, equipping you to seamlessly translate data into meaningful research insights.
SOCY203
Sociological Theory
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: SOCY100.
Examines major trends in the history and development of sociological thought, including theories of inequality, the self, institutions, and more. With each theorist students will learn what sociologists assume and focus on when studying societies.
SOCY230
Sociological Social Psychology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Why do people do that? Sitting at the nexus of sociology and psychology, this course surveys the various ways in which sociologists have answered this question. We investigate individuals-for example, how they develop and understand themselves in relation to others, how they choose to present themselves to the world, and how they form thoughts and opinions. And we study larger units of analyses, from small groups to the broader society. Topics covered include socialization, identity formation, social influence, group processes, how social processes shape individual behavior, and how human behavior shapes society.
SOCY325
The Sociology of Gender
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: 3 credits in SOCY courses.
Cross-listed with: WGSS325.
Credit only granted for: SOCY325, WMST325 or WGSS325.
Formerly: WMST325.
Institutional bases of gender roles and gender inequality, cultural perspectives on gender, gender socialization, feminism, and gender-role change. Emphasis on contemporary American society.
SOCY386
(Perm Req)
Experiential Learning
Credits: 3 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
Restriction: Permission of BSOS-Sociology department; and junior standing or higher.
Contact department for information to register for this course.
SOCY399
(Perm Req)
Independent Study in Sociology
Credits: 1 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Contact department for information to register for this course.
SOCY432
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: 6 credits in SOCY courses; or permission of BSOS-Sociology department.
This course broadens students' understanding of social movements in the United States. Many topics are discussed, including the emergence of social movements, why people join social movements, collective identity, gender, culture, emotions, tactics, repression, and the decline of social movements. Various movements are reviewed, including the civil rights movement, the Chicano movement, the women's movement, the LGBTQ movement, the white power movement, the American Indian movement, and the animal rights movement.
SOCY450
Investigating Women's Empowerment in Low and Middle Income Countries
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: SOCY201 and SOCY202; or permission of BSOS-Sociology department.
Students in this course will learn how the study of women's empowerment in low and middle income countries (LMICs) has developed, its current state of measurement, and new avenues to pursue in the future. Examining the extensive research on gender-based inequalities in educational attainment, employment rates, and health status, students will investigate how power imbalances across individuals, households, and institutional factors result in persistent inequality. Bringing an intersectional perspective to the forefront of the course, we will study how to design effective intervention policies that seek to improve the daily lives of women, girls and their families.
SOCY498B
Selected Topics in Sociology; Sociology of Climate Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Climate change is one of the most urgent and consequential issues of the twenty-first century and understanding the social dimensions of climate change is an inherently sociological concern. In this course we will look at: 1) the social causes of climate change and how social structure informs human relationships with the environment, 2) the social impacts of climate change and how inequality and power intersect with ecological risks, and 3) how societies are responding or not responding to climate change.
SOCY498I
Selected Topics in Sociology; Qualitative Content Analysis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
SOCY498V
Selected Topics in Sociology; Sociology of Sport and Film
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
SOCY670
Applied Research Methods and Technological Training Approaches
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs: Public Safety Leadership and Administration (MPS); Leadership in Diverse Organizations certificate; Criminology and Criminal Justice (Master's); Criminology and Criminal Justice (Doctoral); Sociology (Master's); Sociology (Doctoral); or permission from BSOS-Sociology department.
Introduces students to the purpose, methodology, analysis, and ethics of social science research, especially in the areas of criminal justice and law enforcement. Students will engage in the research process from developing a research question, designing, and conducting a thorough research study, and collecting data for analysis and findings. Both qualitative and quantitative research models will be shared to facilitate students' learning around methodological inquiry and interpretation, including survey design, literature reviews, and report writing. Additionally, students will be exposed to contemporary models impacting law enforcement and public officials, such as algorithmic bias, facial recognition, and individual and community surveillance. At the end of the course, students will be expected to complete a research paper after submission of a research proposal to complete course requirements.
SOCY699
Special Social Problems
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
Contact department for information to register for this course.
SOCY758
Advanced Special Topics in Sex Roles
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud, S-F
SOCY799
Master's Thesis Research
Credits: 1 - 6
Grad Meth: S-F
Contact department for information to register for this course.
SOCY898
Pre-Candidacy Research
Credits: 1 - 8
Grad Meth: Reg
Contact department for information to register for this course.
SOCY899
Doctoral Dissertation Research
Credits: 1 - 8
Grad Meth: S-F
Contact department for information to register for this course.