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Courses - Fall 2024
AASP
African American Studies Department Site
Open Seats as of
07/19/2024 at 10:30 PM
AASP100
Introduction to African American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Significant aspects of the history of African Americans with particular emphasis on the evolution and development of black communities from slavery to the present. Interdisciplinary introduction to social, political, legal and economic roots of contemporary problems faced by blacks in the United States with applications to the lives of other racial and ethnic minorities in the Americas and in other societies.
AASP100H
Introduction to African American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Significant aspects of the history of African Americans with particular emphasis on the evolution and development of black communities from slavery to the present. Interdisciplinary introduction to social, political, legal and economic roots of contemporary problems faced by blacks in the United States with applications to the lives of other racial and ethnic minorities in the Americas and in other societies.
AASP101
Public Policy and the Black Community
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
Formerly: AASP300.
The impact of public policies on the black community and the role of the policy process in affecting the social, economic and political well-being of minorities. Particular attention given to the post-1960 to present era.
AASP200
African Civilization
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
A survey of African civilizations from 4500 B.C. to present. Analysis of traditional social systems. Discussion of the impact of European colonization on these civilizations. Analysis of the influence of traditional African social systems on modern African institutions as well as discussion of contemporary processes of Africanization.
AASP202
Black Culture in the United States
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
The course examines important aspects of African American life and thought which are reflected in African American literature, drama, music and art. Beginning with the cultural heritage of slavery, the course surveys the changing modes of black creative expression from the 19th-century to the present.
AASP210
Intro to Research Design and Analysis in African American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Introduces students to quantitative and qualitative research methods used in social science with a focus on Black populations and African American Studies Research. Uses practical exercises, such as class surveys and mock focus groups, to examine fundamental concepts of the research process from conceptualization of research questions to interpretation of data and research articles. The course is designed for undergraduate students with little or no background knowledge in social science research methods.
AASP230
Social (In)Justice and African-American Health and Well-Being
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
African Americans suffer worse outcomes than non-Hispanic whites on nearly every health measure and outcomes that link to overall well-being like depressive symptoms or homicides. Health disparities are experienced by other underrepresented minority groups, but because of the unique historic and current experiences of African Americans, the determinants and solutions to African American health disparities are unique. The premise of this course is that African American health disparities are due to social injustices perpetuated on the institutional level that have permeated the lived experiences of African Americans leading to racial disparities in health and well-being. As such, the solutions on the both policy, and community, level must have a social justice approach.
AASP298C
African-American History to 1865
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Cross-listed with: HIST254.
Credit only granted for: HIST254 or AASP298C.
Survey of the principal developments in the history and culture of the peoples of African descent in colonial North America and the United States to 1865. Examines the African past, the Atlantic slave trade, variation in slavery, the growth of free black communities, the transformations of families and cultural forms, and patterns of resistance.
AASP298L
African-American Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: ENGL234.
Credit only granted for: ENGL234 or AASP298L.
An exploration of the stories black authors tell about themselves, their communities, and the nation as informed by time and place, gender, sexuality, and class. African American perspective themes such as art, childhood, sexuality, marriage, alienation and mortality, as well as representations of slavery, Reconstruction, racial violence and the Nadir, legalized racism and segregation, black patriotism and black ex-patriots, the optimism of integration, and the prospects of a post-racial America.
Cross-listed with ENGL234. Credit granted for AASP298L or ENGL234.
AASP301
Applied Policy Analysis and the Black Community
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: AASP101.
Recommended: Completion of one semester of statistics is recommended.
Development and application of the tools needed for examining the effectiveness of alternative policy options confronting minority communities. Review policy research methods used in forming and evaluating policies. Examination of the policy process.
AASP310
African Slave Trade
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: AASP202 or AASP100; or permission of BSOS-African American Studies department.
Formerly: AASP311.
The relationship of the slave trade of Africans to the development of British capitalism and its industrial revolution; and to the economic and social development of the Americas.
AASP340
Black Existentialism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Credit only granted for: AASP340, ENGL368O, PHIL338E, or PHPE308C .
Examines the critical transformation of European existentialist ideas through close readings of black existentialists Aime Cesaire, Frantz Fanon, George Lamming, and Wilson Harris, paired with key essays from Sartre, Camus, and Merleau-Ponty. As well, we will engage black existentialism not just as a series of claims, but also a method, which allows us to read works by African- American writers such as W.E.B. Du Bois, James Baldwin, and Ralph Ellison in an existentialist frame. Lastly, we will consider the matter of how and why existentialism continues to function so centrally in contemporary Africana philosophy.
Cross-listed with ENGL368O, PHIL338E, and PHPE308C. Credit only granted for ENGL368O, AASP340, PHIL338E, or PHPE308C.
AASP361
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Cross-listed with: WGSS360.
Credit only granted for: WGSS360, WMST360 or AASP361.
Formerly: WMST360.
An interdisciplinary analysis of the lives and experiences of women across the Caribbean region, through an examination of their roles in individual, national, social and cultural formations. Special emphasis on contemporary women's issues and organizations.
Additionally for Fall 2024: Cross-listed with WGSS360 and LACS348P. Credit only granted for WGSS360, AASP361, or LACS348P.
AASP386
(Perm Req)
Experiential Learning
Credits: 3 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
Restriction: Permission of BSOS-African American Studies department; and junior standing or higher.
AASP397
(Perm Req)
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Permission of BSOS-African American Studies department.
Directed research in African American Studies resulting in the completion and defense of a senior thesis.
Contact department for information to register for this course.
AASP398B
Selected Topics in the African Diaspora; Black Immigrants: Challenges and Impacts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Cross-listed with IMMR319D. Credit only granted for AASP398B or IMMR319D.

How does immigration affect Black communities in the United States? How are foreign Black affected by living in the United States? Students will learn about: US history of immigration policy; pull and push factors driving Black migration; comparisons in socioeconomic outcomes between foreign and native Blacks; and differences between 1st and 2nd generation Black immigrants.
AASP398J
Selected Topics in the African Diaspora; Black Women in Twentieth Century America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Cross-listed with HIST319X, WGSS379J, and AMST498D. Credit only granted for HIST319X, WGSS379J, AMST498D, or AASP398J.

Traces twentieth-century United States history from the perspective of Black women. We will center their diverse voices and experiences as we explore themes including family, work, activism, and cultural expression.
AASP398K
Selected Topics in the African Diaspora; History of Black Education in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Cross-listed with HIST339K and AMST498F. Credit only granted for HIST339K, AASP398K, or AMST498F.

Explores the development of formal education created by and for African Americans, from the antebellum era through the twenty-first century. Examine the historical roots of recent debates around race, justice, and equity in American schools.
AASP398N
Selected Topics in the African Diaspora; Race, Health and Narrative
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Cross-listed with ENGL368N. Credit only granted with ENGL368N or AASP398N.
AASP398Q
Selected Topics in the African Diaspora; Black Baltimore in the Post Racial U.S: African American Urban Culture in the Age of Obama
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Cross-listed with AMST328M. Credit only granted for AASP398Q or AMST328M.

Using the city of Baltimore as our case study and taking an interdisciplinary approach that draws from the scholarly fields of African American studies, sociology, geography, anthropology, history, and urban planning this course explores how both Blackness and anti-Blackness shape the city, its histories, its racial and cultural geography, its social movements, its political economy, and the competing visions for its future. This is an interactive course that will work to develop students capacity to understand and discuss major and minor moments in the history of Black Baltimore; understand and discuss the relationship between material conditions, racism, and urban policy; develop interdisciplinary frameworks through which to interpret and analyze the contemporary and historical conditions shaping the lived experiences of Black Baltimoreans; and analyze scholarship produced within the African American Studies tradition.
AASP398U
Selected Topics in the African Diaspora; Angela Davis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Cross-listed with AMST328B, ENGL368F, and WGSS379U. Credit only granted for AASP398U, AMST328B, ENGL368F, and WGSS379U.

This course explores the meaning and significance of Angela Davis work for thinking through issues of race, nation, class, gender, carceral culture, and transnational solidarity. Her life and work is set between theorizing histories of race, racism, class, and gender and political organizing and public intellectual work. We will examine all of these aspects by reading her work from its beginning and up through contemporary commentary on incarceration, Palestine, and related issues. The centerpiece of this course will be her study of African-American music in its Black feminist iteration, Blues Legacies and Black Feminism.
AASP399
(Perm Req)
Research in African-American Studies
Credits: 1 - 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
Contact department for information to register for this course.
AASP478E
Humanities Topics in African American Studies; Black Digitalities
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Cross-listed with ENGL438B. Credit only granted for ENGL438B or AASP478E.

In investigating a broad range of materials: essays, literature, film, VR, and video games, this class in digital study and practice explores the long history of Black Atlantic engagement with digital techniques and modalities. Over the course of the semester students will engage a variety of hands on experiences, creating or conceptualizing digital objects as entry points into learning how to read digital experiences from both cultural and computational perspectives. Writing assignments will especially focus on how play and interactivity impact narrative and representation. By combining close reading practice with digital treatments of canonical African American texts, this class will help students historicize important cross-fertilizations between Black expressive traditions and a range of contemporary media.
AASP478G
Humanities Topics in African American Studies; Plants & Diaspora: Black and Indigenous Environmental History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Cross-listed with HIST419O. Credit only granted for HIST419O or AASP478G.

Reading seminar investigating the African Diaspora in the Americas through several plants, such as mangroves, sesame, rice, oil palm, coconut palm, cassava, and peanuts. Students analyze environmental histories of slavery, colonialism, and rebellion and explore how Black and Indigenous experiences shaped landscapes of extraction, freedom, and justice.
AASP479
Special Research in African-American Studies
Credits: 1 - 9
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
AASP479A
Special Research in African-American Studies; Advanced Field Research in African American Politics
Credits: 1 - 9
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
This course is designed to guide students through the process of conducting advanced research on political and societal phenomena that impact the Black community. Students will receive hands-on experience conducting field experiments, deploying in-person and virtual surveys, conducting interviews and focus groups, and analyzing data.
AASP498O
Special Topics in Black Culture; African American and Latino Social, Cultural and Political Relations: 1940 to Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
Cross-listed with USLT498E. Credit granted for AASP498O or USLT498E.

An examination of the social, cultural, and political relationships between African American and Latino/a/x communities. In doing so, we will explore identity conundrums such as what constitutes a Latino/a/x. Who is African American? This nation has rarely seen two groups often lumped together spatially and socially with a rich history of working together towards progress, so divided and contentious. We will also through the analysis of trends look to find points of mutual concern and possible convergence and political coalition. In this course, it will be necessary to examine residential patterns and segregation, as well as learn about Latin American political and racial formation. We also will examine Afro-latinidad, which complicates the sociopolitical landscape and relationship between African American and Latinx communities.
AASP499L
Advanced Topics in Public Policy and the Black Community; Covering Social Justice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Cross-listed with JOUR458J. Credit only granted for: JOUR458J or AASP499L.

The objective of this class is to expose students to the best journalistic practices in covering race and social justice issues. Students will explore how social justice is covered in the media through readings, discussions, guest lectures and research assignments to help students understand the history and background of social justice and how reporters cover these issues. Students will develop critical analytical skills through their research and will write a reported essay about a national or international social justice issue impacting society.
AASP499N
Advanced Topics in Public Policy and the Black Community; News Coverage of Racial Issues
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Junior standing or higher.
AASP499U
Advanced Topics in Public Policy and the Black Community; End Gun Violence: An Analysis of Structural Violence, Interpersonal Violence and Trauma in African-American Communities
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Gun violence is the leading cause of death and disability among African-American children and adult men between the ages of 15-44. Structural violence conceptualizes the ways social structures, institutions and systems are complicit in the harm of specific populations (e.g., shortened life expectancy among African Americans). These harms are often preventable. Structural and interpersonal violence, specifically community firearm violence, impacts the physical, psychological, social and emotional well-being, and quality of life of African-Americans, a demographic disproportionately impacted by the harms caused by structural and interpersonal violence. Using an interdisciplinary, structural justice and anti-racist approach this course examines the intersection of structuralviolence, interpersonal violence and trauma in African-American communities impacted by gun violence.