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Courses - Fall 2024
HNUH
University Honors
Open Seats as of
07/19/2024 at 10:30 PM
HNUH100
Credits: 1
Grad Meth: Reg
First-semester orientation and exploration seminar required of all UH students.
Restricted to first-semester UH students.
HNUH218C
Globalizing the American Revolution
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HIST223.
Credit only granted for: HNUH218C or HIST223.
How is the American Revolution a creation story in the making of our multi-cultural and interconnected modern world? Consider the Declaration of Independence. When first published on July 5, 1776, it was printed by an immigrant Irishman on Dutch paper that had been brought over from England. This was the first such declaration of independence ever issued, but its ideas and forms traveled far and wide. More than 100 other declarations of independence have been issued since then. The people that declaration mobilized are similarly diverse: the American Revolution is as much the story of Creek farmers, Spanish soldiers, French slaves, Canadian fugitives, Indian tea-growers, and African statesmen as it is of the Minutemen and Sons of Liberty. In this globe-trotting class, students will be positioned to debate how the familiar story of the American Revolution changes when we place it in transnational context.
HNUH218C is the required Big Question course in the Butterfly Effects thematic cluster. Butterfly Effects courses will be offered through Spring 2026.
HNUH218R
Stealing from the Poor, Giving to the Rich: The Political Economy of Global Capitalism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS
Street names and museum exhibits are being renamed in Europe to erase the ghosts of their colonial history. Yet, this speaks of the colonial "era" as the past, when in fact it is very much our present. The economic principle driving colonialism--capitalism--encouraged an insatiable appetite for territorial acquisition, human bondage, and destruction that stole wealth, life, and joy from racialized "others" to fuel European development. We maintain and further these thefts, oppressions, and exploitations through our purchasing habits and justify them through cultural ideas and ignorance. What would it mean to undo these oppressions? What must we understand to begin this process? This course surveys colonial capitalism and its legacies in Sub-Saharan Africa, the Americas, Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa to explore how history informs the present robbing of the Global South for the Global North's development, as well as pathways towards resistance and reconciliation.
HNUH218R is part of the Butterfly Effects thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH218C to complete the cluster. Butterfly Effects courses will be offered through Spring 2026.
HNUH228C
The Fiction of Fact: Science as Storytelling
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
What is a fact? Science is often viewed as an unbiased, fact-based, analytical discipline. However, throughout history, science has sometimes been the most potent weapon for creating and supporting political fictions and social hierarchies. Not unlike the discipline of the humanities, the sciences practice interpretation: scientists observe behaviors, of subject or objects, and necessarily provide an interpretation of the data. But it is the recourse to the "real" that has made science so powerful in underwriting cultural constructs. Whether we observe how science is manipulated in the public sphere, or how it is practiced for good or ill, it has been used to naturalize hierarchies of race, class or gender. Through a range of materials--fiction, film, visual arts, scientific articles, public humanities and political theses - this course will explore one of the most potent cases of this phenomenon of "scientific" storytelling: the case of race.
HNUH228C is the required Big Question course in the Science & Fiction thematic cluster. Science & Fiction courses will be offered through Spring 2026.
HNUH228O
Liquid Crystals: the Secret of Life
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
From Superman's Kryptonite to the Star Trek crew spending a lifetime traversing the universe, evidence of space travel has occupied science fiction for ages. Now, we are in a new era: real life is catching up with fiction. Nations have sent extended missions to the Moon and Mars, and recently the OSIRIS-Rex brought rocks and dust from the asteroid 101955 Bennu down to Earth. To understand how real life can catch up with fiction (or cannot), we look at liquid crystals, the substances that are the secret of life itself. Liquid crystals are all around and in us. They are the material used in the displays that surround us - telephones, t.v.s, and computers - and the molecules that make life possible. In short, they are essential to us and to everything else that lives. Through a study of liquid crystals and their phases, students will learn the tools to address such pressing concerns as why extremes of temperature and pressure affect life the way they do, and what we can do about it.
HNUH228O is part of the Science & Fiction thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH228C to complete the cluster. Science & Fiction courses will be offered through Spring 2026.
HNUH228R
The Picture of Health and Illness: Modern Medicine in Illustration
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
From prehistoric carvings, through King Tut's burial mask and Michelangelo's David, to the Lincoln Memorial and Body Worlds, images have long been used to communicate what people can and should be. After the "Scientific Revolution" in Europe, when identity was increasingly tied to biology, medical illustrations communicated theories of the ideal body and how it should, and should not, look. Doctors working in the midst of scientific revolution unequivocally tied health to race, gender, and sexuality by enlisting engravers, photographers, and printers to depict the healthy body as a European man and all others as weak, flawed, or ill. This course takes up questions about science, illustration, and identity. Can science tell us who we really are? Do pictures reveal the truth about our bodies? In this class, students will develop their own theory of how science continues to shape who we think we can be and how we might resist those limitations.
HNUH228R is part of the Science & Fiction thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH228C to complete the cluster. Science & Fiction courses will be offered through Spring 2026.
HNUH229T
Climate in Crisis: Socio-Environmental Sustainability
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS
What does it mean to achieve sustainability and how does use of a socio-environmental lens help move the world in that direction? In this, the theory component of the Climate in Crisis track, students will develop an understanding of socio-environmental systems, what they have in common with other complex adaptive systems and the approaches used to study them. With a focus on why a socio-environmental systems approach can help illuminate the environmental, socio-cultural, economic, and intersectional dimensions of sustainability, we will explore what different disciplines bring to this complex topic and use qualitative and quantitative approaches to grapple with problems of sustainability. How do we work with stakeholders to identify the vulnerable, the equitable paths forward, and the trade-offs? Who are the winners and losers of policy decisions? In HNUH229P, students will complement the work of this course with hands-on engagement at the level of Federal policy and legislation.
HNUH238C
Surveillant Society, Surveillant Selves
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Do the social and individual benefits of surveillance outweigh its risks? Surveillance is a ubiquitous practice in contemporary society. Governments surveil populations; corporations surveil customers and users; and individuals surveil themselves and others. From red light cameras and doorbell security cameras to geo-tracking apps and smart appliances, surveillant practices shape 21st-century lifestyles. Many take these practices for granted as acceptable trade-offs for individual and collective benefits. Others sound the alarm on the dangers of being tracked and monitored, with concerns over individual liberty, social inequalities, and more. In this course we will debate how surveillance shapes social practices and selves. Students will draw their own conclusions about the role of surveillance in society, and what, if anything, should be done to change it.
HNUH238C is the required Big Question course in the Surveillance thematic cluster. Surveillance courses will be offered through Spring 2026.
HNUH238R
Invasive: Feminist Perspectives on Power, Politics, and Ecosurveillance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
Invasive species play a key role in 60% of plant and animal extinctions, constituting a serious threat to global biodiversity and costing over $423 billion annually. But what is at stake in the impulse to frame a species as "invasive"? What modes of watching, tracking, and surveilling emerge in the context of invasive species management? What are the material and ethical implications of these practices? As the cost of invasive species management has quadrupled every decade since 1970 and is likely to continue to increase, what alternatives exist? Reading through the lens of feminist science studies, this course asks what species movement might teach us about the possibilities and challenges of multispecies environmental ethics. Students will examine theoretical, historical, cultural, and practice-based accounts to better understand how our collective and individual actions continue to unevenly shape the biodiversity of our changing planet.
HNUH238R is part of the Surveillance thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH238C to complete the cluster. Surveillance courses will be offered through Spring 2026.
HNUH239T
Geopolitics of Finance: Innovation & Cross-Cultural Globalization
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Introduces students to the creative possibilities of the global economy: cross-cultural innovation, collaborative design-driven solutions, and enduring innovation with global purchase. Covers innovations in global business that are transforming the future through an embrace of diverse cultural perspectives. Working with interactive idealized design, out-of-the-box-thinking, and strategic exploration tools, students will explore and experience relevant design to new and cross-cultural value creation. Through rapid prototyping, immersive reflections, and innovative design activities, students will experience how to translate insight into action, and action into tangible results. The evolutionary application of frameworks in this course culminates in a capstone project. This course is self-contained but paired with HNUH239P in the Geopolitics of Finance track, which explores how globalization has brought about fundamental changes to our daily lives by making the world more interdependent.
HNUH248C
The Societal Impact of Artificial Intelligence
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
How will AI change society? AI is changing not only business, but the nature of society itself. This course investigates the nature of those changes and forecasts their future development. With a focus on the implications to business, including the nature of human jobs as AI does an increasing amount of work, students will debate the implications of AI through a variety of lenses. From definitions of consciousness and the potential for robots to claim rights to the gender implications of AI, we will explore its philosophical and political implications. As AI is also capital, we will interrogate what the advance of AI means to capitalists and for labor. Finally, we will enter the debate around whether AI will require more than machine learning to approximate general intelligence and whether it can truly be creative. Through the exploration of the unprecedented pitfalls and opportunities that AI represents, students will learn how best to cope with a world that is dependent on AI.
HNUH248C is the required Big Question course in the Artificial? Intelligence? thematic cluster. Artificial? Intelligence? Courses will be offered through Spring 2026.
HNUH248O
We the Artificial People: How AI has Reshaped Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
Artificial intelligence (AI) has had profound impacts on the modern political landscape, in the US and abroad. From political campaigns powered by AI-driven audience microtargeting to AI-powered bots that influence public discourse to animosity incentivized by algorithmic content curation, AI has changed how politicians engage with the public, revealed new societal vulnerabilities, and exacerbated longstanding social ills. At the same time, these technologies empower new voices and engagement in political processes. This course encourages the critical evaluation of how AI has impacted political behavior and opened new threats like foreign electoral inference, disinformation, and manipulation through deep-fakes and generative language models. Through an exploration of key dimensions and challenges around the use of AI in political processes and methods to cope with these challenges, students will debate AI governance and frameworks for ethical, fair, transparent, and accountable AI.
HNUH248O is part of the Artificial? Intelligence? thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH248C to complete the cluster. Artificial? Intelligence? Courses will be offered through Spring 2026.
HNUH248Q
Frankenscience: An Exploration of "Natural" and "Artificial" In Society and Science Fiction
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
What is "natural" and what is "artificial"? While this distinction might seem obvious at first, modern biology has blurred it in surprising ways. Genetic engineering, vaccination, immunotherapies, bionics, and cybernetics all combine natural and artificial components to bring new dimensions to the way we think about human health. At the same time, humans have grappled with fears and innovation through speculative fiction far longer than these ideas have had practical applications. Landmark stories of artificial life include beings in Greek mythology (Talos), Jewish lore (golem), Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, and more to the present day. Approaching the interface between biological and artificial materials from both perspectives, this course will present history's cutting-edge developments in biomedical research and explore the boundaries of the natural and artificial in science fiction, allowing students to develop tools for grappling with AI and other "Frankenscience."
HNUH248Q is part of the Artificial? Intelligence? thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH248C to complete the cluster. Artificial? Intelligence? Courses will be offered through Spring 2026.
HNUH248R
Artificial Intelligence: Critical Examinations through Science Fiction and Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
AI permeates our world, but science fiction (SF) told stories about it centuries before AI became a reality in the 1950s, shaping our understanding and expectations through words and images. In this course, students will trace AI's evolution through SF to critically examine how key SF works have shaped how we think about AI and intelligence. Through an exploration of existing AI, like autonomous weapon systems, generative AI, and AI assistants, as well as a visit to UMD's AI department, students will learn to be critical viewers, readers, and developers as they grapple with AI's moral and social implications. Using the context of SF and technological developments, we will explore what the creation, existence, and evolution of fictional and real AI means for technology and humanity.
HNUH248R is part of the Artificial? Intelligence? thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH248C to complete the cluster. Artificial? Intelligence? Courses will be offered through Spring 2026.
HNUH249P
National Security: US Foreign Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
Credit only granted for: HNUH249P or HONR269T.
Formerly: HONR269T.
Following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the U.S. launched a major effort to dismantle the Taliban and create a sustainable democracy in Afghanistan. In 2021, the Taliban took control of the country. Was the U.S. effort doomed to fail? To answer this question, UH students will partner with peers at the American University of Afghanistan through a virtual global classroom to examine the lessons learned from the U.S. and international presence in Afghanistan over the past 20 years. Through reading assignments and virtual meetings with former senior U.S. and Afghan officials, students will examine the reasons behind the downfall of the country and analyze whether the outcome could have been changed. Students are not expected to have any prior knowledge about the conflict in Afghanistan. This course is self-contained but paired with HNUH249T in the National Security track, which explores debates around efforts to protect the nation from terrorism while preserving our values.
HNUH249T
National Security: Domestic Dilemmas
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
Credit only granted for: HNUH249T or HONR278D.
Formerly: HONR278D.
The police detain a man thought to be plotting a terrorist attack the next day in a U.S. city that would kill or injure thousands. They want to subject him to "enhanced interrogation," which some consider to be torture. Should the police be permitted to use enhanced interrogation techniques? Who decides? This course will ask key questions raised during the efforts of our national security apparatus to protect the nation. Given the tension between the powers of the government to protect citizens, and the necessary limits on that power, what are the fundamental principles that should govern our efforts to protect the nation while preserving our values? Students will try their hand at finding the delicate balance of these principles in difficult national security dilemmas. This course is self-contained but paired with HNUH249P in the National Security track, which explores post-9/11 policy decisions around the U.S. effort to create a sustainable democracy in Afghanistan.
HNUH258B
The Ecology of Childhood Poverty
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
How does poverty shape the relationship between humans and their environment? It may seem obvious that being poor in childhood has enduring effects on development. What is less obvious is how experiencing poverty in childhood shapes relationships between children and their surroundings, including family interactions, peer relationships, adult dynamics, and the health of the community. Less clear still is the extent to which positive interactions with caretakers and social supports can protect children from potential harm as they grow up. This course focuses on the complexity of poverty as a social force and community concern. Students will investigate the nature of poverty through an interdisciplinary lens that includes social theory, developmental psychology, and empirical studies. After analyzing various approaches to the study of child poverty, students will be in a position to use research on parenting and poverty to evaluate public policy and social programs in their own backyard.
HNUH258B is the required I-Series course in the Metamorphosis thematic cluster. Metamorphosis courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH258U
The Basis of Behavior: Evolution and the Origin of Actions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSNS
Why do some monkeys spend time grooming each other in large groups, while others lose their minds with rage if another monkey comes too close? Complex organisms exhibit behaviors that both fascinate and confound, and the way an animal behaves dictates how it interacts with its environment, with profound consequences. Individual behaviors can have dramatic effects on individual fitness, an individual's groupmates, and even the evolution of species. This leads to a fundamental question in behavioral evolution: why do animals do the things they do? The answer lies in the interaction between individual experiences and eons of natural selection. In this seminar, students investigate what organisms were, what they have become, and why. With a focus on the transitions in behavior that caused single cells to evolve over time into complex societies, students will apply evolutionary principles to individual development and explore how and why individuals choose certain behaviors over others.
HNUH258U is part of the Metamorphosis thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH258B to complete the cluster. Metamorphosis courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH259P
Drawn to D.C.: Mapping the City
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must have matriculated in University Honors starting in Fall 2020 or later.
Spaces, materials, objects, structures--the building-blocks of cities--index the values of the societies that produce them. By their very nature cities are memory devices. Yet, in an increasingly transient and virtual world, with access to a seemingly infinite amount of memory, what is the status of the spaces we inhabit? This course will explore the relationship among memory, the body and the built environment. Beginning with the role cities play in our individual lives and the construction of personal memories, we will take account of what we forget by remembering and what experiences are missing. Through lectures, seminars and discussions, students will produce short experimental books and pamphlets remapping Washington D.C. and the many invisible - personal - cities it contains. No previous art or design experience required. This course is self-contained but paired with HNUH259T in the Drawn to D.C. track, which explores the created spaces we inhabit, and how they inhabit us.
HUNH259P pairs with HUNH259P to complete the Drawn to D.C. Theory/Practice track. This pair of courses can be taken in any order. This track will be offered at least through the 2024-25 academic year.
HNUH268B
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
What traction does the past have in society today? This course explores globally how the past gains traction in society today and becomes remade in the present. That inquiry will be guided by the idea of heritage, as it mobilizes the past within a broad spectrum of social, political, economic, and environmental issues. We will examine western relationships to the past as intimately tied to property and the drive to plunder, collect, and catalogue. Increasingly, conceptions of heritage include landscapes, as well as intangibles such as music, dance, and folklore. This broad definition honors the diversity of present-day relations to the past, even as it strains heritage management models that are organized around definitions and regulations, and bear the weight of historical injustice. Close examination of heritage at work within global crisis and struggle prompts questions on who owns the past, and who owns up to it. What do we owe the past, and will we be good ancestors to the future?
HNUH268B is the required I-Series course in the Heritage thematic cluster. Heritage courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH268I
Origin Stories: Case Studies in American Identity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
E Pluribus Unum, the motto on U.S. currency, is one way to describe how America sees itself as a nation. Yet, the United States has always been a country of disparate, converging cultural identities brought together through circumstance and movement such as colonization, immigration, and the transatlantic slave trade. Despite unifying notions such as the melting-pot metaphor and the Pledge of Allegiance, the American experience is one that features racial and ethnic tensions, varying in intensity depending on the geopolitical context of the moment. If we say we are American, where does that shared heritage align with individual identity and where does it diverge? With theories and tools drawn from Cultural Studies, Sociolinguistics, and Microhistory, this course will explore the construction of racial and ethnic differences to understand the dynamic nature of our heritage(s) and how it shapes our identities.
HNUH268W
Where the Waters Blend: Contemporary Indigenous Perspectives on History, Traditions, and Modern Issues
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC
In this unique cultural and personal learning experience, students will explore the history, traditions, and contemporary issues faced by Maryland's Indigenous people. The experiential work of the course asks students to consider how the past matters, particularly when it is embodied in the land they live on, and their present obligations to it. On-campus and place-based learning, focused on the precolonial and colonial histories of Maryland's Indigenous people, and their contemporary issues create opportunities for students to reflect upon and interrogate their understanding of Maryland's past, present, and future. Students will emerge from this course with a greater understanding of the Maryland's Indigenous people and an increased capacity to challenge colonial and postcolonial paradigms that marginalize the Indigenous people in our region, nation, and across the globe.
HNUH268W is part of the Heritage thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH268B to complete the cluster. Heritage courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH269P
Building Community: How to Make Friends
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: HNUH248U or HNUH269P.
Formerly: HNUH248U.
In 2017, U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy deemed loneliness an "epidemic." While the rise of social media is meant to foster connection, over 23% of adults report being lonely and social networks have been shrinking for decades. Despite increasing rates of loneliness, it is still possible to overcome these trends and find connection. We tend to assume that we should know how to connect with others intuitively, but, as rising rates of loneliness indicate, this is not the case: connection is something we must learn and practice. In this applied course, students will learn the science of connection and engage in practical activities designed to help them make and keep friends. They will leave the course better able to foster meaningful connections. This course is self-contained but paired with HNUH269T in the Building Community track, where you will learn the social value of showing up, for the world and for yourself.
HNUH278B
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
How do ordinary citizens power democracy? At the age of 18, every American citizen is endowed with the right to vote, but what if democracy demands more than voting? With democratic processes seemingly in peril all around us, what can and should ordinary citizens do to safeguard democracy? Looking beyond the basic right to vote, this class will instead explore the complex ecosystem of citizenship practices necessary for collective self-governance. Turning to both philosophy and history, the course material addresses the power and peril of such civic habits as mutual aid, economic participation, tolerance, attention, organizing, protest, and more. We consider what resources these habits require, what virtues they inspire, and what happens when they conflict with each other. Students in this course will acquire the tools to develop and act on their own answer to the pressing question of what it will take to save democracy.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH278B is the required I-Series course in the Civil Bonds thematic cluster. Civil Bonds courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH278I
Bonded: Loneliness, Health, and Quality of Life
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
Society has become more and more disconnected, with 61% of American reporting being lonely. The U.S. Surgeon General's Advisory on the Healing Effects of Social Connection and Community reports that "The mortality impact of being socially disconnected is similar to that caused by smoking up to 15 cigarettes a day, and even greater than that associated with obesity and physical inactivity." Disconnection is devastating for health and for society. Particularly in a democracy predicated on the health of civic life, which requires interpersonal and community relationships, where does this predicament leave us as a society? This course illuminates the potential root causes of disconnection: early familial relationships, attachment styles, and broader technological trends. Students will leave the course with a toolkit of evidence-based strategies they can use - and share - to help heal these divides and repair our core social connections.
HNUH278V
Climate Change, Infectious Disease, and Civil Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
Viruses that are lethal to human life have been on earth for centuries. Why are they surging now? And how can we respond to the recent breakneck spread of Coronavirus? This class begins its journey with Homo sapiens, our ancestor that dispersed out of Africa and carried infectious diseases across the planet. Human expansion into new ecosystems also provided opportunities for us to acquire new pathogens. While all of human history is marked by diseases caused by human migration, the Industrial Revolution greatly accelerated human mobility while planting the seeds of the human impact on climate change. Today, the increasingly rapid movement of people and goods, combined with a warming planet and the large-scale disruption of major ecosystems has witnessed an unprecedented spread of infectious diseases. Students will explore how these trends impact our lives and collectively challenge themselves to do what must be done to save our planet and ourselves.
HNUH278V is part of the Civil Bonds thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH278B to complete the cluster. Civil Bonds courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH288B
Race, Reproduction and Rights
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Can humanity thrive without ensuring reproductive freedom? The 2022 US Supreme Court decision that the right to an abortion is unconstitutional has generated impassioned debate about women's rights and access to reproductive health care in the US and globally. This debate opens space to think beyond "pro-choice or pro-life" polarization and create conditions that promote equity, respect for rights, and a healthy society. These conditions would need to address injustices such as the racism, gender inequalities, marginalization, and colonization that produce disparities in reproductive health care and jeopardize the well-being of individuals, families, communities, and countries. Who controls the bodies of marginalized women and men? What is the meaning of reproductive rights for people who have little power? This course challenges students to bring together multiple disciplines, become critical data consumers, and develop innovative ways to use this knowledge to influence policy.
HNUH288B is the required I-Series course in the Health Matters thematic cluster. Health Matters courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH288U
The Body Knows: Creating Healthy Intimacy on College Campuses
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
How do we figure out what we physically desire? How do we know where our boundaries are and how do we communicate that to others? What would it look like to create a campus community where young people are confident about their sexuality and their ability to communicate the nuances of their needs to potential partners? This course is designed as a creative workshop to help students put their own embodied knowledge in conversation with theories and practices of healthy intimacy. Core texts explore the history of sexual violence as a tool of colonization, the relationship between feminism and sex-positivity in popular culture, and the consent theories that have become central to college campus responses to sexual violence. With the help of performance-based techniques, students will have the opportunity to research issues specific to UMD, design curricula for their peers, and advocate for an end to sexual violence on campus.
HNUH288U is part of the Health Matters thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH288B to complete the cluster. Health Matters courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH288W
Over My Dead Body: Law and the Ethics of Healthcare
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
In real time during the pandemic, we had a front-row seat to how much global healthcare can be a function not of the law but of human action. From how to prioritize populations for vaccines to individual decisions about masks, we were plunged into an almost daily discussion of the values and moral principles that guide nations and people in making choices about healthcare. This class invites students to explore their sense of right and wrong in the public healthcare debate. We will look at traditional issues such as legal paternalism, informed consent, and governmental distrust. And we will take up pressing current issues like abortion's impact on identity/privacy, disparities in marginalized communities, and biometric technologies. Students will acquire the tools to think critically think about these important issues of fairness and what our current practices reveal about society's values.
HNUH300
Vantage Point Seminar
Credits: 2
Grad Meth: Reg
Goal-setting and project-design seminar required of all UH students and taken in the second semester of the sophomore year or the first semester of the junior year.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

Vantage Point is for UH students in their 4th or 5th semester who have already completed or are completing their second cluster or track for the UH Citation.
HNUH318T
(Perm Req)
Political Engagement and Advocacy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Federal Fellows Program; and permission of instructor.
Cross-listed with: FGSM310.
Credit only granted for: HNUH318T or FGSM310.
An examination of questions and issues in the practice of political engagement and advocacy. Guest lecturers drawn from political, civic engagement, and advocacy arenas will visit class and participate in discussions.
HNUH319T
(Perm Req)
Civic Leadership and Human Services
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Maryland Fellows Program; and Permission of Department.
Cross-listed with: FGSM315.
An examination of important issues, methodologies and tools of civic leadership in relation to human services, especially at the state and local level.
HNUH328T
(Perm Req)
Public Health Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Federal Fellows Program; and permission of instructor.
Cross-listed with: FGSM320.
Credit only granted for: UNIV348P, HNUH328T or FGSM320.
Formerly: UNIV348P.
An exploration of the major questions and issues facing the U.S. health care system as well as the formulation and implementation of health policy.
HNUH338T
(Perm Req)
Homeland and National Security Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Federal Fellows Program; and permission of instructor.
Cross-listed with: FGSM330.
Credit only granted for: UNIV348T, HNUH338T or FGSM330.
Formerly: UNIV348T.
An examination of the concept of U.S. homeland and national security, threats, and major vulnerabilities in the context of recent history.
HNUH348T
(Perm Req)
Energy and Environmental Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Federal Fellows Program; and permission of instructor.
Cross-listed with: FGSM340.
Credit only granted for: UNIV348E, HNUH348T or FGSM340.
Formerly: UNIV348E.
An examination of issues of energy and environmental sustainability through an investigation of policy-making in energy, climate change, and sustainable development.
HNUH358T
(Perm Req)
Critical Regions and International Relations
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Global Fellows Program; and permission of instructor.
Cross-listed with: FGSM350.
Credit only granted for: HNUH358T or FGSM350.
An examination of international relations and foreign policy challenges in critical regions.
HNUH359T
U.S. Intelligence and Policymaking
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Global Fellows Program; and Permission of Department.
Cross-listed with: FGSM355.
Examines the role of intelligence in supporting U.S. security strategy and policy. Students will learn how the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) is structured and organized, and will explore how intelligence is deployed to support the warfighter, diplomats, and senior-level decisionmakers. The course emphasizes the development of critical thinking and analytic skills, as well as professional writing and oral presentation abilities that are necessary for successful work in national security organizations. The course will feature guest lecturers from real-world practitioners to supplement course readings.
HNUH368T
(Perm Req)
U.S. Diplomacy and Policymaking
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Global Fellows Program; and permission of instructor.
Cross-listed with: FGSM360.
Credit only granted for: HNIUH368T or FGSM360.
An examination of questions and issues in the practice of contemporary diplomacy and policy-making. Guest lecturers drawn from Washington policy-making and foreign service communities will visit class and participate in discussion.
HNUH369T
Economic Diplomacy: Challenges and Opportunities
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Global Fellows Program; AND Permission of Department.
Cross-listed with: FGSM365.
Credit only granted for: FGSM365 or HNUH369T.
An examination of political, social, and environmental aspects of the global economy in the context of power competition and technological change.
HNUH378T
(Perm Req)
Science Diplomacy: Foreign Policy & Science, Technology, and Innovation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Global Fellows Program; and permission of instructor.
Cross-listed with: FGSM370.
Credit only granted for: UNIV389F, HNUH378T or FGSM370.
Formerly: UNIV389F.
An exploration of the critical roles scientific knowledge and technological innovation play in the formation and implementation of foreign policy issues, including energy and climate change, public health, space and innovation, and economic development.
HNUH379T
(Perm Req)
Strategic Thinking, AI, and Innovation Power
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
Restriction: Must be in the UMD Fellows Program; and Permission of Department.
Cross-listed with: FGSM375.
This course will prepare students for careers in technology innovation in three segments. First, students will ground themselves in the basics of strategic theory and how to make a strategy at any level of analysis. Second, from a practitioner's perspective, students will explore the U.S. innovation ecosystem in the context of world affairs across industry, academia, government, and venture. By doing so they can also examine potential career paths in building technology power to improve international security. Third, students will gain practical experience from studying cases in innovation power and build their own tech strategy as a capstone experience. Through all three phases of the class, artificial intelligence will be used as the base case and the most important general purpose technology of our day thus gaining an appreciation for AI itself on one hand, and how it is but one example of how technology can impact the destiny of nations on the other.
HNUH398P
(Perm Req)
Federal and Global Experiential Learning
Credits: 3 - 9
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Permission of instructor. Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs.
Cross-listed with: FGSM398.
Credit only granted for: FGSM398 or HNUH398P.
This is the experiential course component of the Federal Fellows Program and Global Fellows Program.
HNUH398T
(Perm Req)
Global Health Challenges and Water Security
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Global Fellows Program; and permission of instructor.
Cross-listed with: FGSM390.
Credit only granted for: HNUH398T, HONR378M, or FGSM390.
An examination of questions and issues of global health and water security. Expert practitioners will also visit class and participate in discussions.