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Courses - Spring 2022
AASP
African American Studies Department Site
AASP298L
African-American Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL, D
Cross-listed with: ENGL234.
Credit only granted for: ENGL234 or AASP298L.
An exploration of the stories black authors tell about themselves, their communities, and the nation as informed by time and place, gender, sexuality, and class. African American perspective themes such as art, childhood, sexuality, marriage, alienation and mortality, as well as representations of slavery, Reconstruction, racial violence and the Nadir, legalized racism and segregation, black patriotism and black ex-patriots, the optimism of integration, and the prospects of a post-racial America.
Cross-listed with ENGL234. Credit granted for AASP298L or ENGL234.
AAST
Asian American Studies Department Site
AAST233
Introduction to Asian American Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL, D
Cross-listed with ENGL233.
Credit only granted for: ENGL233 or AAST233.
A survey of Asian American literature with an emphasis on recurrent themes and historical context.
CLAS
Classics Department Site
CLAS170
Greek and Roman Mythology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL
Cross-listed with RELS170.
Credit only granted for: CLAS170 or RELS170.
Additional information: This course cannot be taken for language credit.
An introduction to the mythology of ancient Greece and Rome. This course is particularly recommended for students planning to major in foreign languages, English, history, the fine arts, or journalism. Taught in English.
CMLT
Comparative Literature Department Site
CMLT235
Black Diaspora Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL, D
Examination of key works by writers of the African Diaspora. Relationship among black people across multiple geographic spaces; Africa, the Caribbean, the United States, Europe, Latin America, and Asia. Specific historical, cultural, and literary contexts; themes such as gender, sexuality, migration, slavery, freedom, and equality. Readings may include literary texts (fiction, poetry, drama), music and film. All readings in English, but drawn from multiple languages of the black diaspora, including English, Spanish, French and Portuguese.
CMLT270
Global Literature and Social Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL, D
Comparative study of literature through selected literary works from several non-Western cultures, viewed cross-culturally in light of particular social, political, and economic perspectives.
CMLT275
World Literature by Women
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL, D
Cross-listed with: WGSS275.
Credit only granted for: WMST275, CMLT275 or WGSS275.
Formerly: WMST275.
Comparative study of selected works by women writers of several countries, exploring points of intersection and divergence in women's literary representations.
CMLT277
Literatures of the Americas
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL, D
Comparative study of several North, South, and Central American cultures with a focus on the specificities, similarities, and divergences of their literary and cultural texts.
ENGL
English Department Site
ENGL202
Inventing Western Literature: Renaissance to Modern
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL
Wide range of texts from the Renaissance to the 21st century. Themes and literary techniques in the evolution of Western literature. Print publication, industrialization, questioning of religious, political, intellectual, and cultural authority.
ENGL211
English Literature: Beginnings to 1800
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL
Surveys medieval and early modern literary works written in England. Readings may include Beowulf, Chaucer, Spenser, Mary Wroth, Milton; eighteenth-century satire, drama, novels.
ENGL212
English Literature: 1800 to the Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL
Surveys the major literary movements of the period, from Romantic to Victorian to Modern. Such authors as Wordsworth, Keats, Bronte, Tennyson, Browning, Yeats, Joyce, Woolf.
ENGL222
American Literature: 1865 to Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL
Surveys American writing from the Civil War through the Cold War. Authors such as Clemens, Frost, Hurston, Bellow.
ENGL233
Introduction to Asian American Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL, D
Cross-listed with AAST233.
Credit only granted for: ENGL233 or AAST233.
A survey of Asian American literatures with an emphasis on recurrent themes and historical context.
ENGL234
African-American Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL, D
Cross-listed with: AASP298L.
Credit only granted for: ENGL234 or AASP298L.
An exploration of the stories black authors tell about themselves, their communities, and the nation as informed by time and place, gender, sexuality, and class. African American perspective themes such as art, childhood, sexuality, marriage, alienation and mortality, as well as representations of slavery, Reconstruction, racial violence and the Nadir, legalized racism and segregation, black patriotism and black ex-patriots, the optimism of integration, and the prospects of a post-racial America.
Cross-listed with AASP298L. Credit granted for AASP298L or ENGL234.
ENGL235
U.S. Latinx Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
CORE: HL, D
Cross-listed with: AMST298Q.
Credit only granted for: ENGL235 or AMST298Q.
Examines the poetry, prose, and theater of Latinx communities in the United States from their origins in the Spanish colonization of North America to their ongoing development in the 21st century. Considers how authors use literary form to gain insight into human experience, including mortality, religious belief, gender and sexuality, war and peace, family, language use, scientific inquiry, cultural tradition, ecology, and labor. Also studies how Latinx literary traditions have shaped and been shaped by broader currents in American literature, as well as what connections exist between Latinx literature and social and artistic developments in other parts of the world, particularly Latin America and the Caribbean. Authors may include Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, Eulalia Perez, Juan Nepomuceno Seguin, Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Jose Marti, Arthur A. Schomburg, Jesus Colon, Julia de Burgos, Cesar Chavez, Ariel Dorfman, Gloria Anzaldua, Junot Diaz, and Cristina Garcia.
Cross-listed with AMST298Q. Credit granted for ENGL235 or AMST298Q.
ENGL241
What the Novel Does
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL
An exploration of what the novel does that cannot be done by film, by television, by cell-phone screens, by any stream of images, or by textual excerpts pulled up for a quick read. The different ways of the novel, with particular focus on the process of thinking and the developed consciousness. The novel as a machine to think with and an irreplaceable model of complex human thought. Study of how thought is presented in radically different ways in novels that cross lines of class, gender, chronology, and nationality.
ENGL243
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL
An exploration of arguably the most complex, profound, and ubiquitous expression of human experience. Study through close reading of significant forms and conventions of Western poetic tradition. Poetry's roots in oral and folk traditions and connections to popular song forms.
ENGL246
Introduction to the Short Story
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL
A survey of the genre, with a focus on significant elements, such as plot, character, description, style, and theme. Readings will be drawn from a range of cultures and communities.
ENGL250
Reading Women Writing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL, D
Cross-listed with: WGSS255.
Credit only granted for: ENGL250, WMST255 or WGSS255.
Formerly: WMST255.
Explores literary and cultural expressions by women and their receptions within a range of historical periods and genres. Topics such as what does a woman need in order to write, what role does gender play in the production, consumption, and interpretation of texts, and to what extent do women comprise a distinct literary subculture. Interpretation of texts will be guided by feminist and gender theory, ways of reading that have emerged as important to literary studies over the last four decades.
ENGL255
Literature of Science and Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL
Examines science and technology through the lens of British and American literature, primarily between 1800 and the present. Readings from early natural and experimental philosophers of the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment. How literary works represent the ethics of science and technology; beneficial developments of science, and also heavy toll of industrialization. Writers studied may include Francis Bacon, Mary Shelley, Charles Darwin, H.G. Wells, Albert Einstein, Aldous Huxley, Richard Feynman, Philip K. Dick, Octavia Butler, Michael Frayn, and Tom Stoppard.
ENGL265
LGBTQ+ Literatures and Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL, D
Restriction: Must not have completed LGBT265.
Cross-listed with: LGBT265.
Credit only granted for: ENGL265 or LGBT265.
A study of literary and cultural expressions of queer and trans identities, positionalities, and analytics through an exploration of literature, art, and media. We will examine historical and political power relations by considering the intersections of sexuality and gender with race, class, nation, and disability. Topics include the social construction and regulation of sexuality and gender, performance and performativity, intersectionality, and the relationship between aesthetic forms and queer/ trans subjectivity. Our interpretations will be informed by queer and trans theories.
FREN
FREN242
Francophone Writers of Africa and the African Diaspora
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL, D
An analysis of the works and ideas of 20th and 21st century Francophone writers (Africa, the Caribbeans, France). Taught in English.
FREN250
Introduction to Cultural and Textual Analysis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL
Prerequisite: FREN204; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Restriction: Must not be a native/fluent speaker of French.
Credit only granted for: FREN250 or FREN250H.
Introduction to cultural and textual analysis of selected readings from various genres in French literature. Taught in French.
Cross-listed with FREN250H. Credit granted for FREN250 or FREN250H.
FREN250H
Introduction to Cultural and Textual Analysis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL
Prerequisite: FREN204; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Restriction: Must not be a native/fluent speaker of French.
Credit only granted for: FREN250 or FREN250H.
Introduction to cultural and textual analysis of selected readings from various genres in French literature. Taught in French.
For general honors students only. Cross-listed with FREN250. Credit granted for FREN250 or FREN250H.
LGBT
Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Studies
LGBT265
LGBTQ+ Literatures and Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL, D
Restriction: Must not have completed LGBT265.
Cross-listed with: ENGL265.
Credit only granted for: ENGL265 or LGBT265.
A study of literary and cultural expressions of queer and trans identities, positionalities, and analytics through an exploration of literature, art, and media. We will examine historical and political power relations by considering the intersections of sexuality and gender with race, class, nation, and disability. Topics include the social construction and regulation of sexuality and gender, performance and performativity, intersectionality, and the relationship between aesthetic forms and queer/ trans subjectivity. Our interpretations will be informed by queer and trans theories.
RELS
Religious Studies
RELS170
Greek and Roman Mythology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL
Cross-listed with CLAS170.
Credit only granted for: CLAS170 or RELS170.
Additional information: This course cannot be taken for language credit.
An introduction to the mythology of ancient Greece and Rome. This course is particularly recommended for students planning to major in foreign languages, English, history, the fine arts, or journalism. Taught in English.