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Courses - Spring 2020
AASP
African American Studies Department Site
AASP100
Introduction to African American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Significant aspects of the history of African Americans with particular emphasis on the evolution and development of black communities from slavery to the present. Interdisciplinary introduction to social, political, legal and economic roots of contemporary problems faced by blacks in the United States with applications to the lives of other racial and ethnic minorities in the Americas and in other societies.
AASP100H
Introduction to African American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Significant aspects of the history of African Americans with particular emphasis on the evolution and development of black communities from slavery to the present. Interdisciplinary introduction to social, political, legal and economic roots of contemporary problems faced by blacks in the United States with applications to the lives of other racial and ethnic minorities in the Americas and in other societies.
Restricted to HONR students only.
AASP101
Public Policy and the Black Community
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Formerly: AASP300.
The impact of public policies on the black community and the role of the policy process in affecting the social, economic and political well-being of minorities. Particular attention given to the post-1960 to present era.
AASP202
Black Culture in the United States
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
The course examines important aspects of African American life and thought which are reflected in African American literature, drama, music and art. Beginning with the cultural heritage of slavery, the course surveys the changing modes of black creative expression from the 19th-century to the present.
AASP202H
Black Culture in the United States
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
The course examines important aspects of African American life and thought which are reflected in African American literature, drama, music and art. Beginning with the cultural heritage of slavery, the course surveys the changing modes of black creative expression from the 19th-century to the present.
AASP211
Get Out: The Sunken Place of Race Relations in the Post-Racial Era
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: AASP298G or AASP211.
Formerly: AASP298G.
Prevailing thought suggests that we live in an era that is post-racial, particularly after the election of Barack Obama. Media often serves to drive our assessment of where our nation stands on issues like race, gender and sexuality. This course uses the film Get Out to delve into the production, evolution and significance of race in present day America. The course will engage multiple forms of media to investigate life in "Post-Racial" America, including but not limited to the role of stereotypes, interracial relationships, police-community relations, etc.
AASP298A
Special Topics in Afro-American Studies: African-American History, 1865 - Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
AASP298B
Constructions of Manhood and Womanhood in the Black Community
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: WMST265.
Investigates the ways that African Americans are represented and constructed in public and private spheres and explores the social constructions and representations of Black manhood and womanhood from various disciplinary perspectives.
AAST
Asian American Studies Department Site
AAST200
Introduction to Asian American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AMST298C.
Credit only granted for: AAST200 or AMST298C.
The aggregate experience of Asian Pacific Americans, from developments in the countries of origin to their contemporary issues. The histories of Asian Pacific American groups as well as culture, politics, the media, and stereotypes, viewed from an interdisciplinary perspective.
AAST201
Asian American History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with HIST221.
Credit only granted for: AAST201 or HIST221.
Introduction to the history of Asian Americans and Asians in the United States and the Americas and to the field of Asian American Studies, from an interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include theories of race and ethnicity; Asian migration and diaspora to the Americas; Asian American work and labor issues; gender, family, and communities; nationalism and nativism, and anti-Asian movements; Asian Americans in World War II, the Cold War, and the issues in the civil rights & post-civil rights era.
AAST443
Asian American Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AMST498J.
Credit only granted for: AAST498T, AAST443, GVPT368C or AMST 498J.
Formerly: AAST498T.
Students will gain a greater understanding of 1)the role of Asian Americans in US politics, 2) the political attitudes and behaviors of Asian Americans and 3)how to conduct research on Asian American politics. Though the class will concentrate on Asian Americans, issues related to Asian American politics will be examined within the larger context of America's multicultural political landscape.
AMST
American Studies Department Site
AMST202
Cultures of Everyday Life in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Examine the structures and patterns of everyday life in the U.S., utilizing methods such as ethnography, oral history, survey research, and textual, visual, and material cultural analysis.
AMST289A
Shifting Sands: Constructing Cultural Mainstreams and Margins in the U.S.
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
AMST298C
Introduction to Asian American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AAST200.
Credit only granted for: AAST200 or AMST298C.
The aggregate experience of Asian Pacific Americans, from developments in the countries of origin to their contemporary issues. The histories of Asian Pacific American groups as well as culture, politics, the media, and stereotypes, viewed from an interdisciplinary perspective.
AMST498J
Asian American Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AAST443.
Credit only granted for: AAST498T, AAST443, GVPT368C or AMST 498J.
Formerly: AAST498T.
Students will gain a greater understanding of 1)the role of Asian Americans in US politics, 2) the political attitudes and behaviors of Asian Americans and 3)how to conduct research on Asian American politics. Though the class will concentrate on Asian Americans, issues related to Asian American politics will be examined within the larger context of America's multicultural political landscape.
ANTH
Anthropology Department Site
ANTH240
Introduction to Archaeology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Exploration of the variety of past human societies and cultures through archaeology, from the emergence of anatomically modern humans to the more recent historical past.
ANTH242
Fire, Farming and Climate Change: An Archaeology Take on the History of Human Impacts on our Planet
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
An examination of why climate changes, the methods for recording climate change, and case studies of the varied responses of past human societies to climate change in different geographic regions and time periods with varying socio-political and economic systems.
ANTH260
Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology and Linguistics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Culture and social relationships in a wide variety of settings from small-scale to complex societies. An overview of how anthropology analyzes human behavior. Particular attention to the relationship between language and culture.
ANTH266
Changing Climate, Changing Cultures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Explore past, present, and future interactions between humans and climate. Discussions, methods-oriented activities, and case study analyses provide students a foundation for appreciating the role of anthropology in understanding, responding to, and preparing for climate change.
ANTH267
Organic, Mechanical, Digital
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Beginning in the middle to late 20th century, human organization and experience has increasingly been influenced by digital forms of communication and production. Do these changes make us new types of people and societies? By putting the digital world in the context of the major periods associated with organic and mechanical technology, this course examines who contemporary people are and whether or not they are unique. The answer to this question will focus on how technological changes the individual, social organization and the relationship with the natural world. Sources from historians, anthropologists, sociologists, philosophers, political scientists and ecologists will be used to reconstruct these worlds.
ANTH305
Archaeological Methods and Practice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
Prerequisite: ANTH240, ARTH200, or CLAS180.
Cross-listed with: ARTH305, CLAS305, JWST319Y.
Credit only granted for: ANTH305, ARTH305, CLAS305, or JWST319Y.
A team-taught, interdisciplinary course discussing theories, methods, and ethical issues in the practice of archaeology.
ARCH
Architecture Department Site
ARCH420
History of American Architecture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Prerequisite: ARCH225 and ARCH226; or ARCH425 and ARCH426; or permission of the ARCH-Architecture program.
American architecture from the late 17th to the 21st century.
AREC
Agricultural and Resource Economics Department Site
AREC250
Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Credit only granted for: ECON200, AREC240 or AREC250.
An introduction to economic principles of production, marketing, agricultural prices and incomes, farm labor, credit, agricultural policies, and government programs.
AREC345
Global Poverty and Economic Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
This interdisciplinary course explores social and economic development around the world. Topics include geography, democratization, political instability and conflict, health and education, agricultural development, micro-entrepreneurship, and an introduction to impact evaluation methods used to evaluate the efficacy of public policy aimed at alleviating poverty.
ARTH
Art History & Archaeology Department Site
ARTH305
Archaeological Methods and Practice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
Prerequisite: ANTH240, ARTH200, or CLAS180.
Cross-listed with: ANTH305, CLAS305, JWST319Y.
Credit only granted for: ANTH305, ARTH305, CLAS305, or JWST319Y.
A team-taught, interdisciplinary course discussing theories, methods, and ethical issues in the practice of archaeology.
ARTT
Art Studio Department Site
ARTT260
Dangerous Art: Censorship or Subsidy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Combines a broad historical analysis of the relationship between art and authority with an examination of contemporary culture criticism and art practice. Explores the uses and abuses of art and culture in totalitarianand theocratic states as a prelude to a review of the role of official culture in the United States. Examines art and culture in the public arena and many related areas where the arts and policy interact.
BSGC
Global Communities
BSGC102
(Perm Req)
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Prerequisite: BSGC101.
Restriction: Must be in Global Communities Living-Learning program.
A survey of some of the major global challenges facing society today, such as human trafficking, nuclear security, and global health. We explore contending approaches to resolving problems, culminating in a major group project.
CCJS
Criminology and Criminal Justice Department Site
CCJS100
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Introduction to the administration of criminal justice in a democratic society, with emphasis on the theoretical and historical development of law enforcement. The principles of organization and administration for law enforcement; functions and specific activities; planning and research; public relations; personnel and training; inspection and control; direction; policy formulation.
CCJS105
Introduction to Criminology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Criminal behavior and the methods of its study; causation; typologies of criminal acts and offenders; punishment, correction and incapacitation; prevention of crime.
CCJS225
Responses to Violence
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
Conflict is unfortunately resolved through violence in a number of settings. It ranges from interpersonal to international in its scope. This course investigates the strengths and weakness of a number of resolutions to reducing violence over the course of history using both state centered and informal control.
CCJS325
Slavery in the Twenty First Century: Combating Human Trafficking
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: CCJS325 or CCJS498R.
Formerly: CCJS498R.
The trafficking of human beings in its historical, legal, economic, political and social contexts. Scope of the global problem, different forms of human trafficking, and regional trends and practices. Roles of government, the international community and individual actors. Strategies to combat trafficking.
CLAS
Classics Department Site
CLAS289A
CLAS305
Archaeological Methods and Practice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
Prerequisite: ANTH240, ARTH200, or CLAS180.
Cross-listed with: ANTH305, ARTH305, JWST319Y.
Credit only granted for: ANTH305, ARTH305, CLAS305, or JWST319Y.
A team-taught, interdisciplinary course discussing theories, methods, and ethical issues in the practice of archaeology.
CPSS
College Park Scholars-Science, Technology and Society
CPSS225
College Park Scholars Capstone: Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Prerequisite: CPSS100.
Restriction: Must be in the College Park Scholars Science, Technology & Society (CPSS) program.
Formerly: CPSP227.
Exploration and understanding of ways science and technology shape and are shaped by society.
ECON
Economics Department Site
ECON181
Putting a Price on the Environment: An Economist's Perspective on Sustainability
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
How does society balance the benefits of environmental protection and preservation against the costs? Though some might say that the environment is priceless, economists recognize that every action involves trade-offs. This course investigates sustainability through comparing costs and benefits. From this perspective, other questions arise: How can we design policies that incentivize sustainable choices? Why might usual market functioning fail to achieve sustainability? Do we need to put a price on the environment in order to protect it? How do we measure an economy's "success"? This course explores the answers to these and other related questions from an economist's perspective.
ECON185
Energy: Crisis or Breakthrough?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Will we face an energy crisis in the near future, or will technological breakthroughs solve problems? Will we destroy the environment by careless use of polluting energy, or we will find new and clean sources of energy that resolves the environmental issue once and for all? Will politicians and governments succeed in agreeing on a coherent strategy to deal with global issues related to energy, or do we expect individual countries to move in different directions and exacerbate the problems? Students will explore the demand and supply sides of the energy market and their relationships with government policies and environmental concerns. Students will also analyze empirical evidence to better understand the factors affecting energy production and consumption in the past and possible directions in the future. By examining past situations when technological change mitigated problems in energy markets, we can make informed predictions about what could happen next.
ECON200
Principles of Microeconomics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Prerequisite: MATH107 or MATH110; or must have math eligibility of MATH113 or higher.
Credit only granted for: ECON200, AREC240, or AREC250.
Additional information: It is recommended that students complete ECON200 before taking ECON201.
Introduces economic models used to analyze economic behavior by individuals and firms and consequent market outcomes. Applies conceptual analysis to several policy issues and surveys a variety of specific topics within the broad scope of microeconomics.
ECON201
Principles of Macroeconomics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Prerequisite: MATH107 or MATH110; or must have math eligibility of MATH113 or higher.
Recommended: ECON200.
Credit only granted for: ECON201 or ECON205.
An introduction to how market economies behave at the aggregate level. The determination of national income/output and the problems of unemployment inflation, will be examined, along with monetary and fiscal policy.
EDHD
Education, Human Development Department Site
EDHD201
Learning How to Learn
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
Immerses students in the theoretical and empirical study of learning by engaging them in orchestrated experiences and activities drawn directly from the disciplinary research. Students achieve deep understanding of their own learning, as well as the means of enhancing that learning both in school and out-of-school contexts.
EDHD210
(Perm Req)
Foundations of Early Childhood Education
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
Restriction: Permission of EDUC-Human Development and Quantitative Methodology department.
Students explore historical and current research in early childhood education, primary models of curriculum and pedagogy in the field, and the relationship between critical aspects of young children's development and the creation of inclusive learning opportunities for all children, including children at risk. The concept of developmentally appropriate practice and its application across different developmental levels and early childhood classrooms will be introduced and connected with discussion in EDHD220 and EDSP211. Students examine issues in developing and implementing high quality early childhood education experiences for young children with and without disabilities, including the influence of family, culture, and community, the needs of children at risk (e.g., poverty, immigrant status, English Language Learners), and the role of assessment in early learning.
EDHD221
Aggression and Violence in Everyday Life: Can Violence Be Prevented?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
History of aggression and violence in the world and in the United States. Examines the extent to which various forms are prevalent today and scientifically supported prevention strategies. Methods of studying aggression are reviewed, as are theories and methods of preventing aggression and violence.
EDHD231
Inside 21st Century Creativity: How Creative Ideas, Concepts, and Products are Generated
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Mechanisms of the creative mind. Psychological, social, sociological, developmental, cultural, educational, genetic and neural based roots of creativity.
EDHD320
Human Development Through the Life Span
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Central concepts related to parameters of human development, individual and social, which arise throughout the life span. Continuity and change within the developing individual.
EDHD411
Child Growth and Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Theoretical approaches to and empirical studies of physical, psychological and social development from conception to puberty. Implications for home, school and community.
EDHD412
Infant Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Infant development across domains, including perceptual, motor, cognitive, language, social and emotional functioning from pre-natal through third year of life.
EDHD413
Adolescent Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Adolescent development, including special problems encountered in contemporary culture. Observational component and individual case study.
EDHD460
Educational Psychology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Prerequisite: PSYC100; or permission of EDUC-Human Development and Quantitative Methodology department.
Application of psychology to learning processes and theories. Individual differences, measurement, motivation, emotions, intelligence, attitudes, problem solving, thinking and communicating in educational settings.
EDSP
Education, Special Department Site
EDSP289I
Disability: From Stigma and Sideshow to Mainstream and Main Street
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Disability: From Stigma and Sideshow to Mainstream and Main Street, explores the cultural, historical, educational, and medical roots of difference among human beings and examines the impact of cultural and technological changes on individuals traditionally identified as disabled. The course is designed to develop a broad understanding of the concept of "disability" and the emerging technologies that shape contemporary understanding of this phenomenon and the lives of those considered disabled.
ENSP
Environmental Science and Policy Department Site
ENSP102
Introduction to Environmental Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
Additional information: May be taken before or after ENSP101.
Second of two courses that introduce students to the topics studied and methods employed in environmental science and policy. Emphasis on the process of formulating, implementing, and evaluating policy responses to environmental problems, with particular attention to policy controversies related to scientific uncertainty, risk assessment, the valuation of nature, and distributional equity. May be taken before or after ENSP101.
FMSC
Family Science Department Site
FMSC110
Families and Global Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC
Students will explore, define, and study global health, social determinants of health, health inequalities, gender inequality, family violence, and maternal and child health using a global perspective.
FMSC170
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: FMSC170 or FMSC298F.
Formerly: FMSC298F.
Examination of current trends and controversial issues in family life, including issues of marriage, reproductive technologies, adoption, child custody, remarriage, and marital violence.
FMSC260
Couple Relationships
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Credit only granted for: FMSC260 or FMST260.
Formerly: FMST260.
Couple relationships and their alternatives in contemporary dating, courtship and marriage.
Restricted to majors or non-majors with less than or equal to 60 credits.
FMSC302
(Perm Req)
Research Methods in Family Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP
Prerequisite: Must have completed an introductory statistics course.
Restriction: Must be in a major within SPHL-Family Science department.
Credit only granted for: FMSC302 or FMST302.
Formerly: FMST302.
Introduction to the methods of the social and behavioral sciences employed in family science. The role of theory, the development of hypotheses, measurement, design, and data analysis.
FMSC330
Family Theories and Patterns
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Restriction: Junior standing or higher.
Credit only granted for: FMSC330 or FMST330.
Formerly: FMST330.
Theory and research on the family, including a cross-cultural analysis of family patterns.
FMSC332
Children in Families
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Prerequisite: PSYC100 or FMSC105.
Credit only granted for: FMSC332 or FMST332.
Formerly: FMST332.
A family life education approach to the study of children and families. Emphasis on the interaction of children with parents, siblings, extended kin, and the community.
FMSC381
Poverty, Affluence, and Families
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Prerequisite: SOCY100 or SOCY105.
Restriction: Must be in a major within SPHL-Family Science department.
Credit only granted for: FMSC381 or FMST381.
Formerly: FMST381.
Social, political, cultural and economic factors influencing income and wealth in American families.
FMSC460
Violence in Families
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Prerequisite: SOCY100, SOCY105, or PSYC100.
Credit only granted for: FMSC460 or FMST460.
Formerly: FMST460.
Theories of child, spouse, and elder abuse in the family setting. Emphasis on historical, psychological, sociological and legal trends relating to physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. Introduction to methods for prevention and remediation.
GEMS
Gemstone
GEMS104
Topics in Science, Technology and Society (STS)
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Prerequisite: GEMS100.
Restriction: Must be in the Gemstone program.
An examination of how cultural, economic, political and social forces shape scientific and technological systems and, conversely, how scientific and technological systems have affected the culture, economies, organization and politics of societies. Students in the course will form small teams to carry out semester-long research on socio/technical topics related to the course theme chosen for that specific semester.
Discussions will meet at various times during weeks 1-8 (1/27-3/27) and after team formation (3/28) starting week 9, on Thursdays from 5-6:15pm.
GEOG
Geographical Sciences Department Site
GEOG100
Introduction to Geography
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
An introduction to the broad field of geography as it is applicable to the general education student. The course presents the basic rationale of variations in human occupancy of the earth and stresses geographic concepts relevant to understanding world, regional and local issues.
GEOG202
Introduction to Human Geography
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC
Introduction to what geographers do and how they do it. Systematic study of issues regarding social and cultural systems from a global to a local scale. Looks at the distribution of these variables and answers the question "Why here, and not there"?
GVPT
Government and Politics Department Site
GVPT170
American Government
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
A comprehensive study of national government in the United States.
GVPT200
International Political Relations
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
A study of the major factors underlying international relations, the causes of conflict and cooperation among international actors, the role of international institutions, the interactions of domestic and foreign policies, and major issues in security, economy and the environment.
GVPT203
The Challenge of Authoritarianism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
An introduction to the persistent challenge of authoritarianism. The course explores the nature of authoritarianism and its evolution from ancient through modern times. Students will study how authoritarian regimes vary, why citizens sometimes comply with them, and when and how citizens rebel. The course concludes with a review of contemporary authoritarianism, focusing on its resilience in the Middle East and East Asia and its potential for a resurgence in the US and Europe.
GVPT282
Politics and the Developing World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
A study of the domestic governmental institutions; processes and problems such as conflict and economic development; and the socio-economic environments that are common to developing countries of Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and Latin America.
GVPT289A
Appetite for Change: Politics and the Globalization of Food
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: GVPT206 or GVPT289A.
Formerly: GVPT289A.
An overview of the major forces transforming the food system--political, economic, technological, environmental--and the political debates surrounding them.
An overview of the major forces transforming the food system--political, economic, technological, environmental--and the political debates surrounding them.
HACS
ACES-Cybersecurity
HACS208A
Accounting and Economic Aspects of Cybersecurity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living-Learning Program. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs.
HACS208P
Seminar in Cybersecurity; Beyond Technology, the Policy Implications of Cyberspace
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living-Learning Program. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs.
HESP
Hearing and Speech Sciences Department Site
HESP120
Introduction to Linguistics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP
Additional information: HESP120 is required for HESP majors. HESP majors may not substitute LING200.
An introduction to the scientific study of natural language with focus on the basic concepts of phonology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics, with subsequent attention to the applied aspects of linguistic principles.
HESP214
Should I Buy INTO That? Comparing Media Claims with Scientific Evidence from Brain & Behavior Research
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Millions of dollars are spent each year advertising products that "make you smarter" or "learn a foreign language faster" or "increase your memory", etc. But are these statements true? Can they be backed up? Learn how to critically evaluate media claims of new discoveries in brain and behavior. Read popular-press articles, listen to podcast episodes and review commercial products that claim to be based on science. Then, learn how to find out if the claims are true.
HIST
History Department Site
HIST108A
Freshman/Sophomore Seminar in History; Incarceration Nation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
America leads the world in jailing its own citizens and there are now more than two million Americans behind bars. How did it come to this? This course examines America s long history of incarceration, with a particular focus on the period from the Revolution to the Civil War.
America leads the world in jailing its own citizens and there are now more than two million Americans behind bars. How did it come to this? This course examines America s long history of incarceration, with a particular focus on the period from the Revolution to the Civil War.
HIST108B
Freshman/Sophomore Seminar in History; Gandhi: The Individual in History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
Uses the life and legacy of Mohandas K. Gandhi, in modern India and beyond, as a starting point to explore the relationship between individuals in world history and the social contexts that produced them. Topics include non-violence, diet, sexuality, politics, law, technology, the environment, and representations in film and other media.
Uses the life and legacy of Mohandas K. Gandhi, in modern India and beyond, as a starting point to explore the relationship between individuals in world history and the social contexts that produced them. Topics include non-violence, diet, sexuality, politics, law, technology, the environment, and representations in film and other media.
HIST111
The Medieval World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
The development of Europe in the Middle Ages; the role of religious values in shaping new social, economic, and political institutions; medieval literature, art and architecture.
HIST113
The Making of Modern Europe
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Evolution of modern nation states since late medieval times. Industrial-economic structure and demography. Emergence of modern secular society.
HIST142
Looking at America through a Global Lens
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: HIST289I or HIST142.
Formerly: HIST289I.
Looking at America will focus on a thematic approach to the study of foreign -- negative and positive -- perceptions of America in the 20th century.
HIST200
Interpreting American History: Beginnings to 1877
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU
Credit only granted for: HIST156 or HIST200.
Formerly: HIST156.
The United States from colonial times to the end of the Civil War. Establishment and development of American institutions.
HIST201
Interpreting American History: From 1865 to the Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: HIST157 or HIST201.
Formerly: HIST157.
The United States from the end of the Civil War to the present. Economic, social, intellectual, and political developments. Rise of industry and emergence of the United States as a world power.
HIST211
Love, Labor, and Citizenship: History of American Women Since 1880
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with WMST211.
Credit only granted for: HIST211 or WMST211.
An examination of women's changing roles in working class and middle class families, the effects of industrialization on women's economic activities and status, and women's involvement in political and social struggles including those for women's rights, birth control, and civil rights.
HIST221
Asian American History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with AAST201.
Credit only granted for: AAST201 or HIST221.
Introduction to the history of Asian Americans in the United States and the Americas and to the field of Asian American Studies, from an interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include theories of race and ethnicity; Asian migration and diaspora to the Americas; Asian American work and labor issues; gender, family, and communities; nationalism and nativism, and anti-Asian movements; Asian Americans in World War II, the Cold War, and the issues in the civil rights & post-civil rights era.
HIST222
Immigration and Ethnicity in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: AAST222 or HIST222.
The history of immigration and the development of diverse populations i the United States are examined. Topics include related political controversies, the social experiences of immigrants, ethnicity, generations, migration, inter-group relations, race, and diversity in American culture.
HIST225
Modern Military History, 1815-Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
The military history of Europe through an examination of the economic, financial, strategic, tactical, and technological aspects of the development of military institutions and warfare from the Congress of Vienna in 1815 to the present.
HIST233
Empire! The British Imperial Experience 1558-1997
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: HIST219P or HIST233.
Formerly: HIST219P.
Britain's empire from the mid-sixteenth century to the late twentieth century, focusing on the encounter between Britain and indigenous peoples. Topics include the origins of British imperialism in Ireland and North America, the slave trade, the East India Company and India, women in empire, transportation and the making of Australia, sex in empire, missionaries, racial theories, and decolonization.
HIST235
Divorced, Beheaded, Deposed: England and Britain 1485-1689
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
British history from the War of the Roses to the Hanoverian succession; Yorkist and Tudor society and politics; the Renaissance and Reformation in England, Henry VIII through Elizabeth I; 17th-century crises and revolutions; intellectual and cultural changes; the beginnings of empire; the achievement of political and intellectual order.
HIST237
Russian Civilization
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
An overview of Russian history stressing the main lines of development of the Russian state and the evolution of Russian culture to the present day.
HIST245
Reformers, Radicals, and Revolutionaries: The Middle East in the Twentieth Century
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Credit only granted for: HIST219W or HIST245.
Formerly: HIST219W.
The 20th century was a period of dramatic changes in the Middle East. Within the global context of the two World Wars and the Cold War, countries in the region struggled with the effects of colonialism and painful processes of decolonization. The course offers a thematic-comparative approach to issues such as social and political reform, nationalism, the colonial experience, independence struggles, models of governance, political violence, and Islamism. Course lectures and the analysis and discussion of primary sources will lead students to understand that the peoples of the Middle East found answers to the challenges posed by Western dominance based on their specific historical, cultural and socio-economic circumstances.
For Spring 2020; Cross-listed with ARAB298K and RELS219K. Credit granted for HIST245, ARAB298K, or RELS219K.
HIST251
Latin America Since Independence
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with HIST251.
Credit only granted for: HIST251 or LASC251.
Introductory survey of the history of Latin America from the era of independence (c. 1810-1825) through the early 1980s. Major themes include independence and sovereignty, postcolonialism and neocolonialism, nation- and state-building, liberalism, citizenship, economic development and modernization, social organization and stratification, race and ethnicity, gender relations, identity politics, reform and revolution, authoritarianism and democratization, and inter-American relations.
Cross-listed with LASC251. Credit granted for HIST251 or LASC251.
HIST255
African-American History, 1865 - Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
An introductory course in the African-American experience in the United States from 1865 to the present. Topics include the aftermath of the Civil War on US race relations, the rise of segregation, northern migration, World War I and II, Civil Rights Movements, and the Black Power Movement.
Cross-listed with AASP298A. Credit only granted for HIST255 or AASP298A.
HIST281
Inventing Traditions: The Making of Rabbinic Judaism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
Cross-listed with: JWST230, RELS219C.
Credit only granted for: HIST281 or JWST230.
Introduces the dramatic literary and cultural (as well as political and demographic) innovations that reshaped Judaism in late antiquity. Examines the fundamental works and genres of rabbinic literature and the religious movement that produced them. Special emphasis on the rabbinic uses of "tradition" to enhance authority and legitimacy, and to foster group identity.
Additional Note: For Spring 2020; Cross-listed with JWST230 and RELS219C . Credit only granted for HIST281, JWST230, or RELS219C.
HIST283
History of the Jewish People II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: HIST283, HIST283H, JWST235, or JWST235H.
Political, economic, social, and cultural development within Jewish history from the end of Middle Ages to the present. Special attention to twentieth-century developments including the Nazi holocaust and its aftermath, the Zionist movement and the creation of the State of Israel; rise of the contemporary American Jewish community.
HIST289A
Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Medieval Spain: Tolerance, Oppression, and the Problematic Past
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: RELS289C.
Credit only granted for: HIST289A or RELS289C.
For 800 years, medieval Spain was home to one of the most religiously diverse societies in European history. Despite frequent hostilities, the interactions of Spanish Jews, Christians, and Muslims produced a flowering of science, theology, and literature in an often remarkably tolerant climate. Students will learn how medieval Spanish people themselves experienced interreligious contact and conflict. They will also discover the modern pressures, prejudices, and ideals that have shaped historians interpretations of medieval Spain.
Cross-listed with RELS289C. Credit only granted for HIST289A or RELS289C.

For 800 years, medieval Spain was home to one of the most religiously diverse societies in European history. Despite frequent hostilities, the interactions of Spanish Jews, Christians, and Muslims produced a flowering of science, theology, and literature in an often remarkably tolerant climate. Students will learn how medieval Spanish people themselves experienced interreligious contact and conflict. They will also discover the modern pressures, prejudices, and ideals that have shaped historians interpretations of medieval Spain.
HIST289L
Comparative History of Crime and Punishment
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
This course will explore the transformation of crime and punishment in England, France, and America over five centuries. In doing so, it will focus on the connections between forms of government, cultural norms, and punishment. How do ideas about government and its rightful exercise connect to which actions are deemed crimes, and to how those crimes are punished?
HIST289N
The Politics of Sexuality in America: A Historical Approach
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Why do particular issues about sexuality hold such an important place in American political debates? What animates these controversies and what can a historical perspective on these issues add to our understanding of modern sexual politics? This class explores the historical sexual politics that undergird contemporary debates concerning sexuality in America. It focuses on topics that garner significant public attention - Reproductive rights - LGBTQ rights - Sexting - and explores the histories that undergird Americans disagreements.
Why do particular issues about sexuality hold such an important place in American political debates? What animates these controversies and what can a historical perspective on these issues add to our understanding of modern sexual politics? This class explores the historical sexual politics that undergird contemporary debates concerning sexuality in America. It focuses on topics that garner significant public attention - Reproductive rights - LGBTQ rights - Sexting - and explores the histories that undergird Americans disagreements.
HIST289V
What Does It Mean to be An American?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
This course seeks to understand the on-going crisis over national identity and purpose by examining the many factors that go into the big stew known as America.
This course seeks to understand the on-going crisis over national identity and purpose by examining the many factors that go into the big stew known as America.
HIST289X
History and the Politics of American Memory
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
In this course students will study the relationship between history, memory, politics, and 20th Century American warfare. Examining multiple forms used to convey historical information - includingphotography, film, memorials/museums, monuments, children's literature, memoirs, television and digital sites- students will consider how "collective memory-making" has intersected with the changing and contested histories of 20th century American wars.
HIST329Z
Mizrahi Identity in Israel
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: JWST319D, ISRL329M.
Credit only granted for: JWST319D, HIST329Z, or ISRL329M.
Cross-listed with JWST319D and ISRL329M. Credit granted for JWST319D, ISRL329M, or HIST329Z.

This course brings to light narratives of Mizrahi identity in Israel and explores the trajectory of the Mizrahi struggle for equality through its various milestones: the 1959 Wadi Salib Revolt, the Black Panthers Movement in the 1970s, the emergence of the Israeli Sephardi-Orthodox party Shas, and the new wave of Mizrahi activism in the 21st century.
HIST429X
Special Topics in History; Tradition and Change: Jewish Religion in the Modern World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with JWST347 and RELS419R. Credit granted for JWST347, RELS419R, or HIST429X.

An exploration of the history of the different modern Jewish religious movements that developed in Europe, starting with messianic movements and ending with Reform and Orthodoxy. Emphasis will be placed on the influence of the academic study of Judaism on the development of modern Jewish religious ideologies and practices.
HLTH
HLTH130
Introduction to Public and Community Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
An introduction to the theory and practice of public and community health. The influence of public health professionals on the past, present, and future health status of society through the examination of critical health issues will be described. Programming models, theories and policy development are included.
Attendence is expected on the first day of class.
HLTH230
Introduction to Health Behavior
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Psychological, social psychological, and sociological approaches to the following health areas: development of health attitudes and behavior, patient-provider interaction and the organization of health care.
Restricted to majors or non-majors with less than or equal to 45 credits.

Students entering Fall 2018 or later: Prerequisite does not apply.
HLTH234
Global Health Messages: Understanding Exposure & Impact.
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Using a global perspective, this course teaches students to be critical consumers of current and historical health communication interventions. It also provides students with the skills to develop media interventions that target specific and general populations. Students will discover the array of diverse media messages that influence the health and well-being of individuals and communities.
HLTH264
Tweets & Likes: Digital Health & Social Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Examines the current and potential use of digital health and social media to influence public health. Provides an overview of knowledge, skills and terminology necessary to optimize the effectiveness of these technologies to contribute to the enhancement of individual and community health.
HLTH285
Controlling Stress and Tension
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Health problems related to stress and tension. Analysis of causative psychosocial stressors and intervening physiological mechanisms. Emphasis on prevention and control of stress through techniques such as biofeedback, meditation and neuromuscular relaxation.
HLTH285H
(Perm Req)
Controlling Stress and Tension
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Health problems related to stress and tension. Analysis of causative psychosocial stressors and intervening physiological mechanisms. Emphasis on prevention and control of stress through techniques such as biofeedback, meditation and neuromuscular relaxation.
HONR
HONR218A
'Furies from Hell' to 'Femi-Nazis': A History of Modern Anti-Feminism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Women have faced a deep antipathy at nearly every turn in their struggles for civic and social inclusion. These denials of women's rights often take the form of commentaries--sometimes vicious ones--about women's general natures, bodies, and fitness for public life. Women are consistently tagged with various labels of otherness: opponents of women's rights deem them irrational, unnatural, traitors to society, even sexual deviants. This course will examine the dangers that women allegedly represent to social stability from the Enlightenment to today, as well as how women have fought back to assert their rights and independence.
HONR218E
'Naturally Chic': Fashion, Gender, & Nationalism in French History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC
Allegedly uttered by Louis XIV, the Sun King, this statement exposes the importance of fashion to French history. Indeed from its very beginnings, the fashion industry in France has been synonymous with the international reputation of the entire nation. Similarly, being "chic," or having an innate sense of discernment and style, became synonymous with French femininity. This seminar will explore the interconnectivity of the history of fashion design in France, the requirements it placed on French women, and the international reputations and pressures the fashion industry has shouldered since the French Revolution. We will look at how fashion reflected and created the moods of various historical periods, including the designs of Coco Chanel in the 1920s and Christian Dior in the 1950s, and we will also see how French women's national belonging has been innately tied to their ability to display French fashion.
HONR218F
Keeping It Real: Art & the Representation of Reality
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Why bother depicting daily life in art, literature, film, or television? At first glance, nothing could be more boring: ordinary reality surrounds us, so why make it an object of art? Yet for the last several centuries, everyone from the Grand Masters of high art to radically colloquial poets, reality TV producers, and Instagram aficionados have attempted to capture what it feels like to inhabit reality in the modern age. In this class, we will ask questions like: is it possible to document reality, and where does reality meet perception? What counts as ordinary? And what forms of experience are deemed "authentically" real? We will analyze both classical literary realism and a wide variety of subsequent movements--Naturalism, Modernism, magical realism, "hysterical realism," and peripheral realisms--that inherited, rejected, or adapted its assumptions and conventions. We will read two long novels alongside many works of short fiction, poetry, and criticism. In addition, we will explore the surprising tenacity of the realist mode in more recent popular genres like cinematic neorealism, documentaries, sitcoms, reality television, and contemporary visual culture and social media.
HONR218G
Why and How We Read
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Reading is one of the first things we teach children and is often seen as an essential skill of modern life. Why is that? What happens when we read, and why do we do it? How does reading for pleasure differ from the reading we do in school, online, or on the go? As we will see, debates still rage not just about why we read, but about who reads, and when and where and how they do it. This course explores how people have read historically and across cultures, from ancient scroll interpreters to modern book-nerds. Together, we will analyze specific reading methods that are commonly held to build skills like critical thinking, and we will ask how different disciplines read. We will also investigate why reading has long been understood as a liberating activity that enables its practitioners to flourish and, finally, we will ask whether a world mediated by text presents problems for those who lie outside its scope.
HONR218J
Honors Seminar; Sustainability and Development: From the Individual to the Global
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
HONR218W
HONR219M
Honors Seminar; Why Do We Do What We Do? The Role of Motivation in People's Achievements and Choices
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
HONR219W
Honors Seminar; Africa and the Global Criminal Economy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
HONR229K
Honors Seminar; Achieving Justice and Equality in the 21st Century: Problems, Policies and Practices
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
HONR238R
Honors Seminar: Terrorism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
HONR239A
Honors Seminar; Constructing and De-Constructing the Colonial Chesapeake
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
HONR239J
Honors Seminar; "Enemy of the People": When Journalism Investigates the Powerful
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit will only be granted for HONR239J or JOUR289P.
HONR268L
Honors Seminar: United States Immigration Issues
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
HONR269G
Honors Seminar; Hungry, Hot and Crowded: Global Challenges in the 21st Century
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit granted only for HONR269G or HONR229A.
HONR269T
Honors Seminar: Understanding U.S. Foreign Policy toward Afghanistan
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
HONR278D
Honors Seminar; National Security Dilemmas
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
HONR278G
Honors Seminar; Exploring How Foreign Policy is Developed
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
HONR288A
Honors Seminar; Power, Representation, and Public Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
HONR299G
Revolution, Regret, and Reform: The People and Principles of the American Political Tradition
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
This course explores American political history from Independence through the present day. It interrogates the roots of American political ideas, the dynamics of partisan competition, the interaction of class, ethnicity, race, and politics, the evolution of policy preferences, the growth of the state, and the transformation of grassroots expectations and ambitions, among other important themes. By exploring the writings of major figures as well as the preferences of anonymous voters--and everyone in between, this course will help students identify the overarching themes and the important forgotten moments in our nation's political development. Students will end the semester armed with a mastery of this history, an understanding of the methods of political historians and scholars in related fields, and a contextualization of our contemporary political world.
HONR348M
Advanced Honors Seminar; Stock Market
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
INST
Information Studies
INST154
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Examines Apollo mission, one of the greatest engineering accomplishments of all time, in which Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. Since the mission, people have asked: if we can land on the moon, why can't we eliminate poverty? Why can't we cure cancer? Why can't we prevent global warming? Asks what were the social, political, financial, scientific, engineering, operational, and human aspects of the Apollo program that came together to make the moon landings possible?
INST155
Social Networking
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: INFM289I or INST155.
Formerly: INFM289I.
Introduces methods for analyzing and understanding how people use social media - social networking websites, blogging and microblogging, and other forms of online interaction and content generation - and their societal implications. Introduces students to the science and social science of network analysis. Through real world examples, including analysis of their own social networks, students develop skills for describing and understanding the patterns and usage of services like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and others.
INST201
Introduction to Information Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Credit only granted for: INST201 or INST301.
Formerly: INST301.
Examining the effects of new information technologies on how we conduct business, interact with friends, and go through our daily lives. Understanding how technical and social factors have influenced the evolution of information society. Evaluating the transformative power of information in education, policy, and entertainment, and the dark side of these changes.
ISRL
Israel Studies
ISRL329M
Mizrahi Identity in Israel
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: JWST319D, HIST329Z.
Credit only granted for: JWST319D, HIST329Z, or ISRL329M.
Cross-listed with JWST319D and HIST329Z. Credit granted for JWST319D, ISRL329M, or HIST329Z.

This course brings to light narratives of Mizrahi identity in Israel and explores the trajectory of the Mizrahi struggle for equality through its various milestones: the 1959 Wadi Salib Revolt, the Black Panthers Movement in the 1970s, the emergence of the Israeli Sephardi-Orthodox party Shas, and the new wave of Mizrahi activism in the 21st century.
ISRL343
Global Migration and the Israeli Case Study
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: SOCY398G.
Credit only granted for: ISRL349K, GVPT368G, SOCY398G, SOCY398I, or ISRL343.
Formerly: ISRL349K.
Over 70% of Israel's population is made of first, second or third generation immigrants, who came from over 70 countries, making Israel an ultimate immigrant society. This course will focus on the history of Israel as a case study for the understanding of the historical phenomena of modern immigration.
Cross-listed with SOCY398G.
JOUR
Journalism Department Site
JOUR150
Introduction to Mass Communication
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP
Additional information: Not applicable toward journalism major.
Survey of the functions and effects of the mass media in the United States. A consumer's introduction to newspapers, television, radio, film, sound recording, books, magazines, and new media technology.
JOUR289E
Media Law and Ethics in the Digital Age
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR289E or JOUR281.
Formerly: JOUR289E.
Additional information: This course is intended for non-journalism majors.
Explores the First Amendment, libel, privacy, FOIA and copyright as they have evolved in the digital news age of bloggers, tweeters and citizen journalists. The course will cover fundamental legal and ethical concepts as well as practical application.
This course is intended for non-journalism majors. Explore the First Amendment, libel, privacy, FOIA and copyright as they evolved in the digital news age of bloggers, tweeters, and citizen journalists. This course will cover fundamental legal and ethical concepts as well as practical application.
JOUR289P
Scandal: Exposing Corruption, Justice, and Vice in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR289P, JOUR284 or HONR239J.
Formerly: JOUR289P, HONR239J.
Students will examine the nature and meaning of scandals in society: how they are uncovered and constructed; why some forms of wrongdoing are considered scandalous but not others; how this definition has changed over time; and how scandals resonate in ways that reflect societal norms.
Students will examine the nature and meaning of scandals in society: how they are uncovered and constructed; why some forms of wrongdoing are are considered scandalous but not others; how this definition has changed over time; and how scandals resonate in ways that reflect societal norms.
JWST
Jewish Studies Department Site
JWST230
Inventing Traditions: The Making of Rabbinic Judaism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HIST281, RELS219C.
Credit only granted for: HIST281 or JWST230.
Introduces the dramatic literary and cultural (as well as political and demographic) innovations that reshaped Judaism in late antiquity. Examines the fundamental works and genres of rabbinic literature and the religious movement that produced them. Special emphasis on the rabbinic uses of "tradition" to enhance authority and legitimacy, and to foster group identity.
Additional Note: For Spring 2020; Cross-listed with HIST281 and RELS219C . Credit granted for HIST281, JWST230, or RELS219C.
JWST235
History of the Jewish People II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: HIST283, HIST283H, JWST235, or JWST235H.
Political, economic, social and cultural development within Jewish history from the end of the Middle Ages to the present. Special attention to the twentieth century developments including the Nazi Holocaust and its aftermath, the Zionist movement and the creation of the State of Israel, and the rise of the contemporary American-Jewish community.
JWST319D
Mizrahi Identity in Israel
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: HIST329Z, ISRL329M.
Credit only granted for: JWST319D, HIST329Z, or ISRL329M.
Cross-listed with ISRL329M and HIST329Z. Credit granted for JWST319D, ISRL329M, or HIST329Z.

This course brings to light narratives of Mizrahi identity in Israel and explores the trajectory of the Mizrahi struggle for equality through its various milestones: the 1959 Wadi Salib Revolt, the Black Panthers Movement in the 1970s, the emergence of the Israeli Sephardi-Orthodox party Shas, and the new wave of Mizrahi activism in the 21st century.
JWST347
Tradition and Change: Jewish Religion in the Modern World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: HIST429X, RELS419R.
Credit only granted for: JWST347, HIST429X, or RELS419R.
An exploration of the history of the different modern Jewish religious movements that developed in Europe, starting with messianic movements and ending with Reform and Orthodoxy. Emphasis will be placed on the influence of the academic study of Judaism on the development of modern Jewish religious ideologies and practices.
Cross-listed with RELS419R and HIST429X. Credit granted for JWST347, RELS419R, or HIST429X.
KNES
Kinesiology Department Site
KNES222
Gambling in the New Millennium: Poker, The Preakness, Point-spreads, Powerball and Public Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Recommended: ENGL101 and COMM107.
Is gambling in the public interest? Students will critically examine the various implications of "what it means to gamble" through investigations of various gambling forms, different sectors of the gambling industry and the related economics, along with consumer behavior, sport, public policy and public health in this context.
KNES287
Sport and American Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Sport will be related to such social problems as delinquency, segregation, collective behavior, and leisure; to social processes such as socialization, stratification, mobility, and social control; and to those familiar social institutions the family, the school, the church, the military, the economy, the polity, and the mass media.
Restricted to majors or non-majors with less than or equal to 45 credits.
KNES289R
Hoop Dreams: Black Masculinity and Sport
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
KNES293
History of Sport in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
The growth and development of sport in America. The transformation of sport within the perspective of American history, including class sport, professionalization, amateurism, and international involvement.
Restricted to Majors or non-majors with less than or equal to 45 credits.
KNES350
The Psychology of Sports & Exercise
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
An exploration of personality factors, including but not limited to motivation, aggression and emotion, as they affect sports participation and motor skill performance.
KNES350H
(Perm Req)
The Psychology of Sports & Exercise
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
An exploration of personality factors, including but not limited to motivation, aggression and emotion, as they affect sports participation and motor skill performance.
Prerequisite: permission of department.
LASC
Certificate in Latin American Studies
LASC235
Issues in Latin American Studies II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with SPAN235, PORT235.
Credit only granted for: LASC235, PORT235, or SPAN235.
Major issues shaping Latin American and Caribbean societies including the changing constructions of race, ethnicity, gender and class as well as expressions of popular cultures and revolutionary practices. A continuation of LASC/PORT/SPAN234, but completion of 234 is not a prerequisite. Taught in English.
LASC251
Latin America Since Independence
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with HIST251.
Credit only granted for: HIST251 or LASC251.
Introductory survey of the history of Latin America from the era of independence (c. 1810-1825) through the early 1980s. Major themes include independence and sovereignty, postcolonialism and neocolonialism, nation- and state-building, liberalism, citizenship, economic development and modernization, social organization and stratification, race and ethnicity, gender relations, identity politics, reform and revolution, authoritarianism and democratization, and inter-American relations.
LGBT
Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Studies
LGBT200
Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: LGBT200.
An interdisciplinary study of the historical and social contexts of personal, cultural and political aspects of LGBT life. Sources from a variety of fields, such as anthropology, history, psychology, sociology, and women's studies, focusing on writings by and about LGBT people.
LING
Linguistics Department Site
LING200
Introductory Linguistics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Credit only granted for: HESP120 or LING200.
Additional information: Does not count toward the Linguistics major and does not fulfill prerequisite requirements for all upper-level courses.
An exploration of the nature of human language, designed for non-majors. Introduction to the basic concepts and methodology of modern linguistic analysis (sound systems, word formation, sentence structure). Additional topics may include: semantics, pragmatics, social aspects of language, dialects, language change, acquisition, writing systems, typology, language universals, comparison with other communication systems, etc.
LING262
HERITAGE LANGUAGES AND THEIR SPEAKERS
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Additional information: One class per week will be in-field instruction in collecting data from heritage speakers.
An interdisciplinary examination of the phenomenon of heritage language (a bilingual's home language which is distinct from the dominant language of the wider society). Relationship between linguistic structure, cultural and social aspects of language use, and language change. Interpretations of experimental and theoretical work. Relevance of heritage languages for linguistic theory, language policy, and education.
MLAW
MPower Undergraduate Law Programs
MLAW150
Law in a Just Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must be in the College Park Scholars - Justice and Legal Thought program.
An exploration of the theoretical questions relating to such fundamental questions of jurisprudence as "what is law?" and "how can law be deployed as both an enemy and ally of justice?
PHIL
Philosophy Department Site
PHIL202
Know Thyself: Wisdom Through Cognitive Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PHIL209N or PHIL202.
Formerly: PHIL209N.
How do we improve our decision making? Cognitive science demonstrates that self-knowledge isn't as easy as we think, and that there are numerous biases and fallacies that impact our decision-making in ways that are hard for us to be aware of. In this course you will learn what some of these are and how they have been discovered, and you will explore potential strategies for avoiding these fallacies and for making wiser choices.
PLCY
Public Policy
PLCY100
Foundations of Public Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
A survey course, focusing on public policy institutions and analytical issues as well as on overview of key public policy problems. Students will be introduced to public policy as a discipline, with a brief overview of the actors and institutions involved in the process, and familiarize themselves with the kinds of problems typically requiring public action. The course will examine these problems from a multijurisdictional and multisectoral perspective. Specific policy areas examined include education policy, health policy, economic and budgetary policy, criminal justice policy, environmental policy, and national and homeland security policy. The course should permit students to have broad foundational exposure to the field that will give them a solid base for more advanced courses.
PLCY101
Great Thinkers on Public Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Great ideas in public policy, such as equality, efficiency, sovereignty, liberty, bureaucracy, democracy and security are explored through the lens of great thinkers. An introduction to the intellectual foundations of public policy, from ancient theories on collective public action through the more contemporary development of public policy as a discipline. This may start as early as the ancient Greek philosophers and their views on public action through contemporary classics of public policy. At the conclusion of the course, students will have read classic works in the field and will master the key themes that have dominated the intellectual debates about public policy over its history. Emphasis will be on the interdisciplinary foundations of public policy, through examining core disciplinary contributions from economics, political science, management, philosophy, and other relevant disciplines.
PLCY201
Public Leaders and Active Citizens