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Courses - Spring 2020
AASP
African American Studies Department Site
AASP200
African Civilization
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
A survey of African civilizations from 4500 B.C. to present. Analysis of traditional social systems. Discussion of the impact of European colonization on these civilizations. Analysis of the influence of traditional African social systems on modern African institutions as well as discussion of contemporary processes of Africanization.
AASP298L
African-American Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: ENGL234.
Credit only granted for: ENGL234 or AASP298L.
An exploration of the stories black authors tell about themselves, their communities, and the nation as informed by time and place, gender, sexuality, and class. African American perspective themes such as art, childhood, sexuality, marriage, alienation and mortality, as well as representations of slavery, Reconstruction, racial violence and the Nadir, legalized racism and segregation, black patriotism and black ex-patriots, the optimism of integration, and the prospects of a post-racial America.
Cross-listed with ENGL234. Credit granted for AASP298L or ENGL234.
AAST
Asian American Studies Department Site
AAST233
Introduction to Asian American Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with ENGL233.
Credit only granted for: ENGL233 or AAST233.
A survey of Asian American literature with an emphasis on recurrent themes and historical context.
AMST
American Studies Department Site
AMST101
Introduction American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: AMST101 or AMST201.
Formerly: AMST201.
Introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of American Studies by examining concepts such as culture, identity, cultural practices, and globalization, as well as theories underlying these concepts. Engages key themes, especially constructions of difference and identity, cultures of everyday life, and America and the world.
AMST203
Popular Culture in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
An introduction to American popular culture, its historical development, and its role as a reflection of and influence on our culture and society.
AMST205
Material Aspects of American Life
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Historical survey of American material culture. Ways of describing and interpreting accumulated material evidence (e.g., buildings, town plans) introduced by stressing relationship between artifact and culture.
AMST289A
Shifting Sands: Constructing Cultural Mainstreams and Margins in the U.S.
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
AMST418K
Film and American Landscape
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
ARCH
Architecture Department Site
ARCH170
Design Thinking and Architecture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Examines conceptual, perceptual, behavioral, and technical aspects of the built environment, and methods of analysis, problem-solving, and design implementation.
ARCH225
History of World Architecture I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Pre-1500 World Architecture survey course - History of Architecture structured to develop critical thinking and visually literacy with regard to the worldwide legacy of design thinking and cultural production through architecture
ARHU
Arts and Humanities Department Site
ARHU275
Writing to be Seen: Scriptwriting for Theatre, Film, and Television
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Cross-listed with: ENGL275.
Credit only granted for: ENGL275 or ARHU275.
Introduction to the theory and practice of scriptwriting with an opportunity to read, view, evaluate, write, and revise texts meant to be performed. Students will practice writing for the stage, film, and television and also examine selected scripts, performances, and film and television clips as models for their own creative work. Students will complete frequent writing exercises, participate in workshops, and learn to apply scholarship to the analysis and critique of scripts.
ARHU319C
(Perm Req)
Writers' House Second Year Colloquium: Form and Theory of Creative Writing; Spoken Word
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
For further details, please contact Johnna Schmidt jmschmid@umd.edu.
ARTH
Art History & Archaeology Department Site
ARTH200
Art and Society in Ancient and Medieval Europe and the Mediterranean
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Examines the material culture and visual expressions of Mediterranean and European societies from early times until ca. 1300 CE, emphasizing the political, social, and religious context of the works studied, the relationships of the works to the societies that created them, and the interrelationship of these societies.
ARTH201
Art and Society in the West from the Renaissance to the Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Examines representative European and American works of art from the later Middle Ages to the present, highlighting the dynamic exchange between artistic and cultural traditions both within periods and across time.
ARTH255
Art and Society in the Modern American World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Explores the origins and evolution of art in the modern American world, from the late colonial era to the present, comparing major artistic movements and their historical contexts. Considers the diversity of art across Latin America and the United States, and the ways in which artworks mediate social, ethnic, political, and national identities.
ARTT
Art Studio Department Site
ARTT150
Introduction to Art Theory
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Fundamental concepts of global, philosophic, and critical art theory examined through various historic and contemporary texts, and the analysis of works of art.
CHIN
Chinese Department Site
CHIN315
Modern Chinese Literature in Translation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Major works of fiction and drama from 1920 to the present read in the context of social and literary change. Emphasis on western and traditional Chinese influences on the writers and their works. No knowledge of Chinese required.
CLAS
Classics Department Site
CLAS170
Greek and Roman Mythology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with RELS170.
Credit only granted for: CLAS170 or RELS170.
Additional information: This course cannot be taken for language credit.
An introduction to the mythology of ancient Greece and Rome. This course is particularly recommended for students planning to major in foreign languages, English, history, the fine arts, or journalism. Taught in English.
CLAS289A
CLAS470
Approaches to Greek Mythology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Prerequisite: CLAS170; or permission of ARHU-Classics department.
Ancient and modern approaches to understanding Greek myth as expression of human experience, including interpretations drawn from psychology, anthropology, and comparative mythology.
CMLT
Comparative Literature Department Site
CMLT235
Black Diaspora Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Examination of key works by writers of the African Diaspora. Relationship among black people across multiple geographic spaces; Africa, the Caribbean, the United States, Europe, Latin America, and Asia. Specific historical, cultural, and literary contexts; themes such as gender, sexuality, migration, slavery, freedom, and equality. Readings may include literary texts (fiction, poetry, drama), music and film. All readings in English, but drawn from multiple languages of the black diaspora, including English, Spanish, French and Portuguese.
CMLT242
Introduction to Jewish Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: JWST272, ISRL249G.
Credit only granted for: JWST272, CMLT242, or ISRL249G.
A survey of Jewish literature and introduction to methods of reading literature in general and Jewish literature in particular. Concern with what makes a literary corpus Jewish and other issues of canonicity. All texts in English translation.
Cross-listed with JWST272 and ISRL249G. Credit only granted for JWST272, ISRL249G, or CMLT242.
CMLT270
Global Literature and Social Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Comparative study of literature through selected literary works from several non-Western cultures, viewed cross-culturally in light of particular social, political, and economic perspectives.
CMLT275
World Literature by Women
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with WMST275.
Credit only granted for: CMLT275 or WMST275.
Comparative study of selected works by women writers of several countries, exploring points of intersection and divergence in women's literary representations.
CMLT280
Film Art in a Global Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Comparative study of a variety of film traditions from around the world, including cinema from Hollywood, Europe, Asia and developing countries, with a stress on different cultural contexts for film-making and viewing.
Cross-listed with FILM298D. Credit only granted for: CMLT280 or FILM298D.
COMM
Communication Department Site
COMM324
Communication and Gender
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
The creation of images of male and female, and masculine and feminine, through communication, the differences in male and female communication behaviors and styles, and the implications of those images and styles for male-female transactions.
EDSP
Education, Special Department Site
EDSP416
Reading and Writing Instruction in Special Education I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Must be in Special Education program.
Jointly offered with EDSP616.
Credit only granted for: EDSP416 or EDSP616.
Assessment and instruction of reading and writing skills for students in special education.
ENEE
Electrical & Computer Engineering Department Site
ENEE200
Technology and Consequences: Engineering, Ethics, and Humanity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
What makes a technology socially responsible? At UMD, the Fearless Ideas campaign asks us to aim our enthusiasm for technology at big real problems. At the same time, we are coming to appreciate the increasingly complex nature of technological systems as they become integrated into all forms of infrastructure, we realize they may be unpredictable, interdependent on social and biological systems, and have unintended consequences. In this midst of this complexity, people make decisions with far reaching impacts. How then do we follow our passion for technology and innovation but also stay skeptical in a way that allows us to consider the potential and shortcomings of technology? Designed for both engineering and non-engineering students wishing to explore and assess the impact of engineering technology on society and the role of society in generating that technology.
ENGL
English Department Site
ENGL125
Why Poetry Matters
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENGL125 or ENGL289P.
Formerly: ENGL289P.
Introduction to the formal fundamentals of poetry and exploration of the role poetry plays in how we think about the human condition; what constitutes knowledge and wisdom, interior subjectivity and communal identity; and how this knowledge is to be used in confronting new challenges and the perennial questions: how to live with oneself, and as oneself; in time, and with others; here, where we reside; and elsewhere, where we imagine ourselves going.
ENGL142
Literary Maryland
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENGL142 or ENGL289M.
Formerly: ENGL289M.
What does the literature of Maryland teach us about our state's past, present, and future? "Literary Maryland" explores this question by taking students on a tour of our state's prose, poetry, and drama from colonization to the present. In addition to reading fascinating writing and visiting interesting places, you'll learn how the Chesapeake was formed; why nobody sings the entire national anthem; and what led Baltimore to name its football team after a poem written by a Virginian.
ENGL146
Seeing the Present: Graphic Storytelling in the Age of Social Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
We increasingly live in a world dominated by digital images: graphic narratives, data visualizations, tweets, GIFs, and computer animation. Students will learn how to critically analyze this digital visual rhetoric and how to become a skilled user of visual discourse. By examining a range of science fiction, graphic novels, photography, and films, we will develop a critical vocabulary for understanding the possibilities and perils of our digital image culture. We will apply this vocabulary to analyzing visual representations of contemporary political questions including: climate change, criminal justice, bio-technological transformations of the human, and the incorporation of algorithm-based platforms into everyday life.
ENGL152
What is Justice?: Literature and the Invention of Ethical Imagination
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Exploration of literature's unique ability to animate human passions underlying ethical dilemmas. How literary texts shape understanding of justice; how plays, novels, and films define, critique, challenge, and even alter society's comprehension of equity and inequity, crime and punishment, pardon and torture, and ideas about civil liberties and human rights. Attention to how writers have described just and unjust within their historical moment; crucial role of imagination in formation of ethical citizens across time.
ENGL202
Inventing Western Literature: Renaissance to Modern
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Wide range of texts from the Renaissance to the 21st century. Themes and literary techniques in the evolution of Western literature. Print publication, industrialization, questioning of religious, political, intellectual, and cultural authority.
ENGL211
English Literature: Beginnings to 1800
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Surveys medieval and early modern literary works written in England. Readings may include Beowulf, Chaucer, Spenser, Mary Wroth, Milton; eighteenth-century satire, drama, novels.
ENGL212
English Literature: 1800 to the Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Surveys the major literary movements of the period, from Romantic to Victorian to Modern. Such authors as Wordsworth, Keats, Bronte, Tennyson, Browning, Yeats, Joyce, Woolf.
ENGL222
American Literature: 1865 to Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Surveys American writing from the Civil War through the Cold War. Authors such as Clemens, Frost, Hurston, Bellow.
ENGL233
Introduction to Asian American Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with AAST233.
Credit only granted for: ENGL233 or AAST233.
A survey of Asian American literatures with an emphasis on recurrent themes and historical context.
ENGL234
African-American Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AASP298L.
Credit only granted for: ENGL234 or AASP298L.
An exploration of the stories black authors tell about themselves, their communities, and the nation as informed by time and place, gender, sexuality, and class. African American perspective themes such as art, childhood, sexuality, marriage, alienation and mortality, as well as representations of slavery, Reconstruction, racial violence and the Nadir, legalized racism and segregation, black patriotism and black ex-patriots, the optimism of integration, and the prospects of a post-racial America.
Cross-listed with AASP298L. Credit granted for AASP298L or ENGL234.
ENGL235
U.S. Latinx Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AMST298Q.
Credit only granted for: ENGL235 or AMST298Q.
Examines the poetry, prose, and theater of Latinx communities in the United States from their origins in the Spanish colonization of North America to their ongoing development in the 21st century. Considers how authors use literary form to gain insight into human experience, including mortality, religious belief, gender and sexuality, war and peace, family, language use, scientific inquiry, cultural tradition, ecology, and labor. Also studies how Latinx literary traditions have shaped and been shaped by broader currents in American literature, as well as what connections exist between Latinx literature and social and artistic developments in other parts of the world, particularly Latin America and the Caribbean. Authors may include Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, Eulalia Perez, Juan Nepomuceno Seguin, Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Jose Marti, Arthur A. Schomburg, Jesus Colon, Julia de Burgos, Cesar Chavez, Ariel Dorfman, Gloria Anzaldua, Junot Diaz, and Cristina Garcia.
Cross-listed with AMST298Q. Credit granted for ENGL235 or AMST298Q.
ENGL241
What the Novel Does
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
An exploration of what the novel does that cannot be done by film, by television, by cell-phone screens, by any stream of images, or by textual excerpts pulled up for a quick read. The different ways of the novel, with particular focus on the process of thinking and the developed consciousness. The novel as a machine to think with and an irreplaceable model of complex human thought. Study of how thought is presented in radically different ways in novels that cross lines of class, gender, chronology, and nationality.
ENGL243
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
An exploration of arguably the most complex, profound, and ubiquitous expression of human experience. Study through close reading of significant forms and conventions of Western poetic tradition. Poetry's roots in oral and folk traditions and connections to popular song forms.
ENGL245
Film Form and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with FILM245.
Credit only granted for: ENGL245 or FILM245.
Introduction to film as art form and how films create meaning. Basic film terminology; fundamental principles of film form, film narrative, and film history. Examination of film technique and style over past one hundred years. Social and economic functions of film within broader institutional, economic, and cultural contexts.
Restriction: Must not have completed ENGL245 or FILM245. Also offered as: ENGL245. Credit only granted for: CMLT214, CMLT245 or FILM 245. Formerly: CMLT214."
ENGL246
Introduction to the Short Story
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
A survey of the genre, with a focus on significant elements, such as plot, character, description, style, and theme. Readings will be drawn from a range of cultures and communities.
ENGL250
Reading Women Writing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with WMST255.
Credit only granted for: ENGL250 or WMST255.
Explores literary and cultural expressions by women and their receptions within a range of historical periods and genres. Topics such as what does a woman need in order to write, what role does gender play in the production, consumption, and interpretation of texts, and to what extent do women comprise a distinct literary subculture. Interpretation of texts will be guided by feminist and gender theory, ways of reading that have emerged as important to literary studies over the last four decades.
ENGL255
Literature of Science and Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Examines science and technology through the lens of British and American literature, primarily between 1800 and the present. Readings from early natural and experimental philosophers of the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment. How literary works represent the ethics of science and technology; beneficial developments of science, and also heavy toll of industrialization. Writers studied may include Francis Bacon, Mary Shelley, Charles Darwin, H.G. Wells, Albert Einstein, Aldous Huxley, Richard Feynman, Philip K. Dick, Octavia Butler, Michael Frayn, and Tom Stoppard.
ENGL256
Fantasy Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
How fantasy employs alternate forms of representation, such as the fantastical, estranging, or impossible, which other genres would not allow. Through novels, short stories, graphic novels, and film, traces fantasy's roots in mythology and folklore, then explores how modern texts build upon or challenge these origins. Examination of literary strategies texts use to represent the world through speculative modes. How to distinguish fantasy from, and relate it to, other genres such as science fiction, horror, fairly tales, and magical realism. Fantasy's investment in world-building, history, tradition, and categories of identity such as race, class, and gender. How fantasy, as a genre, form, and world-view, is well-suited to our contemporary reality.
ENGL262
Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: JWST262, HEBR298B.
Credit only granted for: JWST262, HEBR293B, or ENGL262.
Origins of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament), with attention to literary formations, archaeology, and social-political settings. Explorations of major questions, including who wrote the Bible, and when; relationships of the biblical tradition to the mythology and religious structures of ancient Israel's near eastern neighbors; and dynamics of politics, religious leadership, and law.
ENGL265
LGBTQ+ Literatures and Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have completed LGBT265.
Cross-listed with LGBT265 .
Credit only granted for: ENGL265 or LGBT265.
A study of literary and cultural expressions of queer and trans identities, positionalities, and analytics through an exploration of literature, art, and media. We will examine historical and political power relations by considering the intersections of sexuality and gender with race, class, nation, and disability. Topics include the social construction and regulation of sexuality and gender, performance and performativity, intersectionality, and the relationship between aesthetic forms and queer/ trans subjectivity. Our interpretations will be informed by queer and trans theories.
ENGL275
Scriptwriting for Theater, Film, and Television
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Cross-listed with: ARHU275.
Credit only granted for: ENGL275 or ARHU275.
Introduction to the theory and practice of scriptwriting with an opportunity to read, view, evaluate, write, and revise texts meant to be performed. Students will practice writing for the stage, film, and television and also examine selected scripts, performances, and film and television clips as models for their own creative work. Students will complete frequent writing exercises, participate in workshops, and learn to apply scholarship to the analysis and critique of scripts.
ENGL280
The English Language
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Introduction to the structure of English and its historical development, with a focus on techniques of linguistic analysis. Major topics include the sound systems of English and its patterns of word formation and sentence structure, and the ways these have changed over time and vary around the world.
ENGL290
Introduction to Digital Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Introductory course in digital studies. Surveys contemporary humanities work in digital technologies, including the web and social media and their historical antecedents. Explores design and making as analytical tools alongside reading and writing. Situates digital media within power and politics and develops critical awareness of how media shape society and ethics. Interdisciplinary approaches to creativity, analysis, and technology. While the course will include hands-on practice, no prior experience of programming, designing, or making required other than a willingness to experiment and play.
ENGL293
Writing in the Wireless World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Recommended: ENGL101.
A hands-on exploration of writing at the intersection of technology and rhetoric. Students will learn to read, analyze, and compose the kinds of multimodal documents--documents combining text, image, and sound--that constitute communication in our digital world.
ENGL294
Persuasion and Cleverness in Social Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Prerequisite: Must have satisfied Fundamental Studies Academic Writing requirement.
Exploration of various persuasive media encountered in daily life through the lens of rhetorical and critical theories. Principles of rhetoric and analysis of how persuasion functions across media. Invention of effective multimedia works appropriate to purpose, audience, and context. Concepts from cultural studies used to develop critical awareness about power and ideology and how they influence the way people produce and understand messages. By integration of technology, rhetoric, and cultural studies, students become more critically-rhetorically informed thinkers, authors, and audiences of arguments and culture in the digital age. Writing intensive course. No prior multimedia experience is expected.
ENGL361
Recovering Oral Histories
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Prerequisite: Students must have completed one course in English, Latin American Studies, or Education.
Service-learning course that gives students an opportunity to develop writing, interviewing, and communication skills as they contribute to the work of a community organization. In the classroom, students will reflect on the process and do background research to understand the particular context of the organization's work. In the field, students will interview (or have informal discussions with) young people helped by the organization in order to construct a narrative about their lives, their perceptions of themselves, and their experiences.
Prerequisite: Must have completed at least one course in English or Latin American Studies. Credit only granted for: ENGL261 or ENGL361. Formerly: ENGL261/ENGL361
ENGL362
Caribbean Literature in English
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: LASC348E.
Credit only granted for: ENGL362 or LASC348E.
Political and literary traditions that intersect in the fiction, poetry, and drama written in English by Caribbean writers, primarily during the 20th century.
Cross-listed with LASC348E. Credit granted for ENGL362 or LASC348E.
FILM
Film Studies Department Site
FILM245
Film Form and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with ENGL245.
Credit only granted for: ENGL245 or FILM245.
Introduction to film as art form and how films create meaning. Basic film terminology; fundamental principles of film form, film narrative, and film history. Examination of film technique and style over past one hundred years. Social and economic functions of film within broader institutional, economic, and cultural contexts.
Restriction: Must not have completed ENGL245 or FILM245. Also offered as: ENGL245. Credit only granted for: CMLT214, CMLT245 or FILM 245. Formely: CMLT214."
FILM332
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with PORT332.
Credit only granted for: PORT332, FILM332, or PORT378.
Formerly: PORT378.
Brazilian films from the late 1950s to the present with a special view to the relationship between cinema, society, historical dates, and social changes in Brazil. Taught in English.
FREN
FREN250
Introduction to Cultural and Textual Analysis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: FREN204; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Restriction: Must not be a native/fluent speaker of French.
Credit only granted for: FREN250 or FREN250H.
Introduction to cultural and textual analysis of selected readings from various genres in French literature. Taught in French.
Cross-listed with FREN250H. Credit granted for FREN250 or FREN250H.
FREN250H
Introduction to Cultural and Textual Analysis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: FREN204; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Restriction: Must not be a native/fluent speaker of French.
Credit only granted for: FREN250 or FREN250H.
Introduction to cultural and textual analysis of selected readings from various genres in French literature. Taught in French.
For general honors students only. Cross-listed with FREN250. Credit granted for FREN250 or FREN250H.
GEMS
Gemstone
GEMS104
Topics in Science, Technology and Society (STS)
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Prerequisite: GEMS100.
Restriction: Must be in the Gemstone program.
An examination of how cultural, economic, political and social forces shape scientific and technological systems and, conversely, how scientific and technological systems have affected the culture, economies, organization and politics of societies. Students in the course will form small teams to carry out semester-long research on socio/technical topics related to the course theme chosen for that specific semester.
Discussions will meet at various times during weeks 1-8 (1/27-3/27) and after team formation (3/28) starting week 9, on Thursdays from 5-6:15pm.
GERM
Germanic Studies Department Site
GERM255
Once Upon a Time: Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
Credit only granted for: GERM255 or GERM289G.
Formerly: GERM289G.
Additional information: Course is taught in English.
A critical examination of how fairy tales and folklore pervade and influence diverse facets of Western culture, ranging from issues of politics and national identity, ethics and morality, violence and fear, education and pedagogy, to gender and sexuality in the establishment and regulation of social norms. Taking the German tales collected by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm as its focal point, the magical and often terrifying world of fairy tales within the German, European, and American cultural traditions from Romanticism to today will be explored.
HDCC
Design Cultures and Creativity
HDCC106
Introduction to Digital and Creativity II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Must be in the Digital Cultures and Creativity Honors College Living/Learning program.
Introduction to the methods and theory of digital cultural production, with emphasis on creative and expressive platforms.
HEBR
HEBR314
Conversation and Composition II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: HEBR313; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
A practical language course recommended for all students continuing with Hebrew. Review of grammar and composition. Selected readings. Oral and written exercises.
HHUM
Honors Humanities Department Site
HHUM106
Honors Humanities: The Humanities in Practice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Recommended: HHUM105.
Restriction: Must be in the Honors Humanities Program.
Additional information: Priority enrollment will be given to students in Honors Humanities.
The application of the disciplines, methods and traditions of the Humanities to contemporary problems and issues such as social injustice, immigration, income inequality, and the role of social media. Students will apply to such issues the tools of the Humanities: research and historical analysis, critical reasoning, communication and persuasion, ethical debate, and imagination. The course will utilize the institutions of Washington, D.C. to explore contemporary problems and will guide students in the creation of their individual proposals for the capstone project that is the culmination of the curriculum in Honors Humanities.
HISP
Historic Preservation
HISP200
The Everyday and the American Environment
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Jointly offered with HISP615.
An introduction to the theories of the everyday within the context of the American built environment. Focuses primarily on the American experience of underrepresented, minority, and/or immigrant communities; both historical and contemporary. Attempts to challenge what is meant by American in describing the American everyday built environment.
HIST
History Department Site
HIST110
The Ancient World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Interpretation of select literature and art of the ancient Mediterranean world with a view to illuminating the antecedents of modern culture; religion and myth in the ancient Near East; Greek philosophical, scientific, and literary invention; and the Roman tradition in politics and administration.
HIST200
Interpreting American History: Beginnings to 1877
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU
Credit only granted for: HIST156 or HIST200.
Formerly: HIST156.
The United States from colonial times to the end of the Civil War. Establishment and development of American institutions.
HIST201
Interpreting American History: From 1865 to the Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: HIST157 or HIST201.
Formerly: HIST157.
The United States from the end of the Civil War to the present. Economic, social, intellectual, and political developments. Rise of industry and emergence of the United States as a world power.
HIST219I
Religions of the Ancient Near East
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: JWST225, RELS219A.
Credit only granted for: JWST225, HIST219I, or RELS219A.
Introduction to ancient Near Eastern religious systems and mythology, from the third millennium BCE through the fourth century BCE. Particular emphasis on Mesopotamia and ancient Israel.
HIST281
Inventing Traditions: The Making of Rabbinic Judaism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
Cross-listed with: JWST230, RELS219C.
Credit only granted for: HIST281 or JWST230.
Introduces the dramatic literary and cultural (as well as political and demographic) innovations that reshaped Judaism in late antiquity. Examines the fundamental works and genres of rabbinic literature and the religious movement that produced them. Special emphasis on the rabbinic uses of "tradition" to enhance authority and legitimacy, and to foster group identity.
Additional Note: For Spring 2020; Cross-listed with JWST230 and RELS219C . Credit only granted for HIST281, JWST230, or RELS219C.
HIST289R
Pocketbook Politics: A History of American Buying and Selling
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Provides a thematic approach to consumerism as it emerged in the United States over the course of three centuries. The history of consumption is a prism through which many aspects of social and political life may be viewed. How does what we wear, what we listen to, or what we eat shape our identities?
This course is designed to provide a thematic approach to consumerism as it emerged in the United States over the course of three centuries. The history of consumption is a prism through which many aspects of social and political life may be viewed. How does what we wear, what we listen to, or what we eat shape our identities?
HIST429X
Special Topics in History; Tradition and Change: Jewish Religion in the Modern World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with JWST347 and RELS419R. Credit granted for JWST347, RELS419R, or HIST429X.

An exploration of the history of the different modern Jewish religious movements that developed in Europe, starting with messianic movements and ending with Reform and Orthodoxy. Emphasis will be placed on the influence of the academic study of Judaism on the development of modern Jewish religious ideologies and practices.
HONR
HONR208L
Honors Seminar; Justice Matters: Law, Literature, and Film
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
HONR208P
Honors Seminar; Tolkien:Mythmaker
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
HONR209W
Honors Seminar; War Stories: Personal Narratives, Fiction, and Film
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
HONR218F
Keeping It Real: Art & the Representation of Reality
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Why bother depicting daily life in art, literature, film, or television? At first glance, nothing could be more boring: ordinary reality surrounds us, so why make it an object of art? Yet for the last several centuries, everyone from the Grand Masters of high art to radically colloquial poets, reality TV producers, and Instagram aficionados have attempted to capture what it feels like to inhabit reality in the modern age. In this class, we will ask questions like: is it possible to document reality, and where does reality meet perception? What counts as ordinary? And what forms of experience are deemed "authentically" real? We will analyze both classical literary realism and a wide variety of subsequent movements--Naturalism, Modernism, magical realism, "hysterical realism," and peripheral realisms--that inherited, rejected, or adapted its assumptions and conventions. We will read two long novels alongside many works of short fiction, poetry, and criticism. In addition, we will explore the surprising tenacity of the realist mode in more recent popular genres like cinematic neorealism, documentaries, sitcoms, reality television, and contemporary visual culture and social media.
HONR218I
It Happened To Me - Truth, Lies, & Discovery in Memoir
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
How good is your memory? Remembering is a tricky process that can change based on how long ago an event happened and our relationship to it. From recalling an early personal memory to participating in cultural memories, our memories can even disagree with other people's. Do you trust the memory of someone who was there when it happened, or a historian who pieces together facts from multiple accounts and objects years later? In this course you will be challenged to explore stories in which memories disagree, traumatic childhoods are forgotten, generational memories morph over time, and memories can be false or created.
HONR218N
Suffering and Its Resistance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
When Freddie Gray was killed in 2015, citizens of Baltimore took to the streets. News agencies from all over the world covered the protests as people demanded justice. Five years later, corruption and violence remain a problem, while the city's murder rate has climbed to one of the highest per capita in the U.S. What did the calls for justice accomplish? What good is protesting? And how do we respond to suffering amidst historical causes, intergenerational resonances, and uneven distribution? By investigating these questions, this course seeks to understand the relationships between power and injustice and to find the connections among resistance, empathy, and hope.
HONR218O
Wild and Wasted: Nature in Film and TV
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
The gaze of the camera lens is one of the most powerful and ubiquitous ways that we experience nature. It is a medium filled with potential for insight, empathy, and conservation; it is also fraught with misrepresentation and exploitation. For the first half of class, we will examine and critique nature in film and TV through three genres: Wildlife and Slow Film, Documentary, and Big Hollywood. Through these units we will gather a sense of how media both supports and masks ecological realities, how indigenous others are represented by colonizing explorers, how nature is depicted variously as resource, wilderness, and acculturated playground, and the differences in focus and effect between niche-market and popular films. The second half of class will be the filmmaking portion. In groups of 4-5, students will collaborate to produce a short film, either narrative or documentary, that may have a thematic focus such as food, habitat, transportation, or waste. Groups will draft and revise a short screenplay, and set up the locations, interviews, and any other simple elements of production they might need. Each group will then produce and finish a short film of ~5 minutes in length and present it to the class. Exceptional work may merit additional support to enter the film into festivals.
HONR218P
Honors Seminar; Immigration: Personal Stories and Policy Changes
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
HONR218T
Honors Seminar; Political Theater: On Stage and in Washington
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
Students must contribute $20.00 toward theater ticket purchases.
HONR229R
Honors Seminar; Short Texts, Great Ideas: The Essay Form
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
HONR229W
Honors Seminar; Revenge of the Funny Women
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
HONR239C
Honors Seminar: The Creative Process in Dance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
HONR239Z
Honors Seminar; Applying Reason to Passion: The Philosophy of Sex
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
HONR248J
Honors Seminar; A Most Human Nation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Students who have taken HHUM205 should contact the instructor for permission.
HONR248V
Music and Poetry: Sound and Sense
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
How is the physical experience of existence expressed in works of art? This course will explore the shared aspects of music and poetry that relate to the nature of human cognition and the philosophy of embodiment, which proposes that metaphor is one of the primary ways we "translate" bodily knowledge into thought to create abstract concepts (ex.: "negotiation is a tool"). A fundamental technical vocabulary for the discussion of form in music and poetry will be developed and used in considering the various metaphors under discussion (movement, time, space, texture). In addition to direct experience with metaphor in musical works and poetry, translation as a process will also be considered as a metaphor for the ways that music and poetry relate to one another in light of the role embodiment plays in language, music and poetry.
HONR258B
"Watch Out! Calm Down." The Goals of Risk Communication
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
You're working at the FDA, and you receive a preliminary report stating that Mad Cow Disease may have compromised a major beef distributor's supply. More tests need to be run to be sure, and the full report will take about two weeks. Do you wait for the full report, not wanting to start a panic? Or do you warn the public, even though the scare might not pan out? If you do warn the public, how do you communicate the findings of the report? People's lives and millions of dollars are on the line: what do you do? The right messages to the right people at the right time can save lives, and risk communication helps us think about how to convey sensitive messages about crucial issues from public health, to technological accident, to natural disaster. We will cover current thinking about the nature of risk, risk perceptions, theoretical perspectives on risk communication, and appliation of these theories to risk events in its real-life context. For example, we will examine such questions as: "Why do people continue to smoke despite knowing the health risks with the habit?," "Why people choose not to leave a high-risk environment, e.g., voluntary evacuation areas prepare for possibility of Hurricane Dorian?," "What are the most effective things the government/local leaders can do to get them out of harm's way?," and "How can we communicate controversial science effectively?"
HONR258D
Stage, Screen, Life: a Cultural History of Drag
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
What does "drag" conjure in your imagination? What about "cross-dressing," "dandyism," "transvestism," "glamor drag," "drag king," "drag queen," "boy actress," "transsexual," "FTM," MTF," "genderqueer, and "gender dysphoria?" Do you know someone who fits one or more of these categories? Do you picture certain celebrities? Have you been to a drag club (kings or queens) or seen films that depict drag? Have you seen a cross-dressed production of Hamlet or Oedipus? We tend to associate "drag" with gender, sex, and sexual orientation, but have you also considered race, ethnicity, and class as sites of drag performance? If you've seen/read/done/considered any of these, were you shocked and dismayed? Intrigued? What questions arose for you? This class is intended to explore some of them with--and perhaps address some of them for--you.
HONR259J
Dreams and Journey: Literature, Pluralism, and Democracy in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
A society's literature provides a fascinating window into the aspirations and priorities of its people. This course uses works of literature as primary documents to gain insight into major themes, trends, and ideas in American history, with a special focus on the conflicting visions of the "American Dream" and ways in which diverse Americans embarked on journeys in pursuit of that dream. Through a thorough analysis of these books and contextualization of the works within their historical setting, we will assess how contemporary Americans understood and reacted to important historical controversies within a pluralistic democracy, and how key social, cultural, and political issues were interrogated and contested in literature as well as the broader society.
HONR269U
Honors Seminar; Hidden Figures: Race, Science, and Black Narrative
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
ISRL
Israel Studies
ISRL249G
Introduction to Jewish Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: JWST272, CMLT242.
Credit only granted for: JWST272, CMLT242, or ISRL249G.
A survey of Jewish literature and introduction to methods of reading literature in general and Jewish literature in particular. Concern with what makes a literary corpus Jewish and other issues of canonicity. All texts in English translation.
ISRL329K
Jewry of Muscle: Zionism and Jewish Masculinity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: JWST319K.
Credit only granted for: JWST319K or ISRL329K.
Cross-listed with JWST319K. Credit granted for JWST319K or ISRL329K.

Part of the Zionist cultural project involved creating a new Jewish masculinity that would replace the diasporic "sissy Jew" with a strong, healthy new "Jewry of Muscle." Using literary and cinematic sources, we will analyze how these Zionist and Israeli cultural productions served to build (and sometimes undermine) this new model of Jewish masculinity.
ITAL
Italian Department Site
ITAL207
Reading and Writing in Italian
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: ITAL204; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Restriction: Must not be a fluent/native speaker of Italian.
Culture-based, process approach to reading and writing in Italian; selected grammatical topics.
JAPN
Japanese Department Site
JAPN425
The Atomic Bomb in Literature and Memory
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
Credit only granted for: JAPN498A or JAPN425.
Formerly: JAPN498A.
Study of declassified documents and commentary on the United States decision to use the bomb in 1945, the many ways Japanese writers have attempted to express their indescribable experiences in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the shaping of historical narratives and national identities in post-war Japan and the U.S. Taught in English.
JOUR
Journalism Department Site
JOUR289F
Beyond Facebook: How Social Media are Transforming Society, Culture, Business and Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR289F or JOUR282.
Formerly: JOUR289F.
Examining the rise of social media and their impact on culture, business, government, politics, journalism and society, this course provides students with a broad contextual understanding of the multidisciplinary impacts of social media such as Twitter, Facebook and similar Internet-based services.
Examining the rise of social media and their impact on culture, business, government, politics, journalism and society, this course provides students with a broad contextual understanding of the multidisciplinary impacts of social media such as Twitter, Facebook and similar Internet-based services.
JOUR456
Literature in Journalism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Credit only granted for: JOUR456 or JOUR673.
From Truman Capote's In Cold Blood to Mark Bowden's Black Hawk Down, students will examine how literary works can help writers approach a subject in a different way than more traditional forms of journalism, including the advantages and limitations of the style.
JWST
Jewish Studies Department Site
JWST225
Religions of the Ancient Near East
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: HIST219I, RELS219A.
Credit only granted for: JWST225, HIST219I, or RELS219A.
Introduction to ancient Near Eastern religious systems and mythology, from the third millennium BCE through the fourth century BCE. Particular emphasis on Mesopotamia and ancient Israel.
Cross-listed with RELS219A and HIST219I.
JWST230
Inventing Traditions: The Making of Rabbinic Judaism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HIST281, RELS219C.
Credit only granted for: HIST281 or JWST230.
Introduces the dramatic literary and cultural (as well as political and demographic) innovations that reshaped Judaism in late antiquity. Examines the fundamental works and genres of rabbinic literature and the religious movement that produced them. Special emphasis on the rabbinic uses of "tradition" to enhance authority and legitimacy, and to foster group identity.
Additional Note: For Spring 2020; Cross-listed with HIST281 and RELS219C . Credit granted for HIST281, JWST230, or RELS219C.
JWST250
Fundamental Concepts of Judaism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with PHIL234, RELS250.
Credit only granted for: JWST250, PHIL234, or RELS250.
A conceptional introduction to Judaism, analyzing its fundamental concepts from both analytical and historical perspectives. Discussion of "normative" Judaism as well as other conceptions of Judaism. Topics include: God, the Jewish people, authority, ethics, the sacred and the profane, particularism and universalism.
JWST262
Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: ENGL262, HEBR298B.
Credit only granted for: JWST262, HEBR293B, or ENGL262.
Origins of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament), with attention to literary formations, archaeology, and social-political settings. Explorations of major questions, including who wrote the Bible, and when; relationships of the biblical tradition to the mythology and religious structures of ancient Israel's near eastern neighbors; and dynamics of politics, religious leadership, and law.
JWST272
Introduction to Jewish Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: CMLT242, ISRL249G.
Credit only granted for: JWST272, CMLT242, or ISRL249G.
A survey of Jewish literature and introduction to methods of reading literature in general and Jewish literature in particular. Concern with what makes a literary corpus Jewish and other issues of canonicity. All texts in English translation.
Cross-listed with ISRL249G and CMLT242. Credit only granted for CMLT242, ISRL249G, or JWST272.
JWST319K
Jewry of Muscle: Zionism and Jewish Masculinity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: ISRL329K.
Credit only granted for: JWST319K or ISRL329K.
Cross-listed with ISRL329K. Credit granted for JWST319K or ISRL329K.

Part of the Zionist cultural project involved creating a new Jewish masculinity that would replace the diasporic "sissy Jew" with a strong, healthy new "Jewry of Muscle." Using literary and cinematic sources, we will analyze how these Zionist and Israeli cultural productions served to build (and sometimes undermine) this new model of Jewish masculinity.
JWST347
Tradition and Change: Jewish Religion in the Modern World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: HIST429X, RELS419R.
Credit only granted for: JWST347, HIST429X, or RELS419R.
An exploration of the history of the different modern Jewish religious movements that developed in Europe, starting with messianic movements and ending with Reform and Orthodoxy. Emphasis will be placed on the influence of the academic study of Judaism on the development of modern Jewish religious ideologies and practices.
Cross-listed with RELS419R and HIST429X. Credit granted for JWST347, RELS419R, or HIST429X.
JWST452
The Golden Age of Jewish Philosophy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: 3 credits in PHIL courses; or permission of ARHU-Meyerhoff Program & Center for Jewish Studies; or permission of ARHU-Philosophy department.
Cross-listed with PHIL417. Credit only granted for: JWST452 or PHIL417.
Jewish philosophy from Maimonides in the 12th century to the expulsion of the Jews from Spain at the end of the 15th Century. Topics include the limitations of human knowledge, creation of the world, foreknowledge and free will, and the existence of God.
LARC
Landscape Architecture Department Site
LARC160
Introduction to Landscape Architecture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
History, theory, philosophy and current practice of the profession of landscape architecture. Explores the interactive relationship between humans and their environment by examining people's perceptions of and changing attitude towards the landscape, as well as, an examination of how these are related to ecological and cultural influences. Topics include urban, ecological, community and creative design.
LARC263
History of Landscape Architecture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
A survey of landscape architecture history from the ancient Western civilizations to the twentieth century with consideration of parallel developments in the Eastern World, European Africa and the Americas.
LASC
Certificate in Latin American Studies
LASC235
Issues in Latin American Studies II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with SPAN235, PORT235.
Credit only granted for: LASC235, PORT235, or SPAN235.
Major issues shaping Latin American and Caribbean societies including the changing constructions of race, ethnicity, gender and class as well as expressions of popular cultures and revolutionary practices. A continuation of LASC/PORT/SPAN234, but completion of 234 is not a prerequisite. Taught in English.
LASC348E
Caribbean Literature in English
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: ENGL362.
Credit only granted for: ENGL362 or LASC348E.
Political and literary traditions that intersect in the fiction, poetry, and drama written in English by Caribbean writers, primarily during the 20th century.
Cross-listed with ENGL362. Credit granted for ENGL362 or LASC348E.
LGBT
Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Studies
LGBT265
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Literatures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have completed ENGL265.
Cross-listed with ENGL265 .
Credit only granted for: ENGL265 or LGBT265.
Exploration of literary and cultural expressions of sexuality and gender. Study of a range of historical periods and literary genres, such as essay, poetry, novel, drama, film. Topics include sexual norms and dissidence, gender identity and expression, the relationship between aesthetic forms and sexual subjectivity. Interpretation of texts particularly through the lens of queer theory. Examination of how sex and gender intersect with other forms of difference, including race and class.
LING
Linguistics Department Site
LING240
Language and Mind
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Additional information: Required for Linguistics majors and recommended for students in related fields.
The study of language as a cognitive phenomenon. Focus on mastering the concepts and technical skills required for further courses in linguistics. Ways of representing people's knowledge of their native language, ways in which that knowledge is attained naturally by children, and how it is used in speaking and listening. Additional topics may include: animal communication, language and the brain, language and thought.
MUSC
School of Music Department Site
MUSC130
Survey of Music Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Must not be in any of the following programs (Music (Professional Program); Music Education).
A study of the principles upon which music is based, and an introduction to the musical repertory performed in America today.
MUSC130H
Survey of Music Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Must not be in any of the following programs (Music (Professional Program); Music Education).
A study of the principles upon which music is based, and an introduction to the musical repertory performed in America today.
MUSC130S
Survey of Music Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Must not be in any of the following programs (Music (Professional Program); Music Education).
A study of the principles upon which music is based, and an introduction to the musical repertory performed in America today.
MUSC205
History of Popular Music, 1950-Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
A historical survey of rock music (blues, rock, soul, metal, rap, etc.) from circa 1950 to the present, with emphasis on popular music as music and popular music as social history.
MUSC210
The Impact of Music on Life
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: MUET210 or MUSC210.
Formerly: MUET210.
Music as a part of culture. Materials drawn from traditions throughout the globe to illustrate issues of historical and contemporary significance, including the impact of race, class and gender on the study of music.
MUSC215
World Popular Musics and Identity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: MUET200 or MUSC215.
Formerly: MUET200.
Focus on popular musics in different cultures with an emphasis on cross-cultural comparisons and analysis of how musics and identity intersect.
MUSC220
Selected Musical Cultures of the World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: MUET220 or MUSC220.
Formerly: MUET220.
A survey of selected musical cultures of the world, such as India, Japan, China, Indonesia, West Africa, Eastern Europe and the Near East.
Also offered as ANTH298B. For Spring 2020; credit only granted for MUET220, MUSC220, or ANTH298B.
PERS
Persian Department Site
PERS371
Introduction to Persian Literature in Translation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Introduction to classical and modern canons of Persian literature in historical, esthetic, and social context. Taught in English.
PHIL
Philosophy Department Site
PHIL100
Introduction to Philosophy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
An introduction to the literature, problems, and methods of philosophy either through a study of some of the main figures in philosophic thought or through an examination of some of the central and recurring problems of philosophy.
PHIL140
Contemporary Moral Issues
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
The uses of philosophical analysis in thinking clearly about such widely debated moral issues as abortion, euthanasia, homosexuality, pornography, reverse discrimination, the death penalty, business ethics, sexual equality, and economic justice.
PHIL202
Know Thyself: Wisdom Through Cognitive Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PHIL209N or PHIL202.
Formerly: PHIL209N.
How do we improve our decision making? Cognitive science demonstrates that self-knowledge isn't as easy as we think, and that there are numerous biases and fallacies that impact our decision-making in ways that are hard for us to be aware of. In this course you will learn what some of these are and how they have been discovered, and you will explore potential strategies for avoiding these fallacies and for making wiser choices.
PHIL203
The Rights and Wrongs of Killing People
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PHIL209J or PHIL203.
Formerly: PHIL209J.
Virtually everyone thinks it's permissible to kill people only in special circumstances. But why is killing usually wrong? Is it ever acceptable to kill an innocent human being intentionally? This course raises these and related questions and examines cases such as terrorism, suicide, abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, war. Except for a brief discussion of animals, all the controversies considered deal with killing and causing death to human beings.
PHIL220
Bioethics: Regulating Right and Wrong
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Credit only granted for: PHIL209A or PHIL220.
Formerly: PHIL209A.
Bioethicists formulate ethical guidelines. They answer questions such as: When life-saving health resources are scarce, who should get them? Should we increase supply of one such resource, kidneys, by buying them from living "donors"? If drug trials in developing countries benefit patients who consent to participate, are the trials ethical, even if the same research would be forbidden in the US? If a sick person aims to hasten her death, how, if at all, might her doctor permissibly help her? In this course, students construct and defend ethical rules in four domains: research ethics, allocation of scarce resources, markets in organs, and physician-assisted dying.
PHIL220H
Bioethics: Regulating Right and Wrong
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Credit only granted for: PHIL209A or PHIL220.
Formerly: PHIL209A.
Bioethicists formulate ethical guidelines. They answer questions such as: When life-saving health resources are scarce, who should get them? Should we increase supply of one such resource, kidneys, by buying them from living "donors"? If drug trials in developing countries benefit patients who consent to participate, are the trials ethical, even if the same research would be forbidden in the US? If a sick person aims to hasten her death, how, if at all, might her doctor permissibly help her? In this course, students construct and defend ethical rules in four domains: research ethics, allocation of scarce resources, markets in organs, and physician-assisted dying.
Restricted to Honors students.
PHIL234
Fundamental Concepts of Judaism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with JWST250, RELS250.
Credit only granted for: JWST250, PHIL234, or RELS250.
A conceptional introduction to Judaism, analyzing its fundamental concepts from both analytical and historical perspectives. Discussion of "normative" Judaism as well as other conceptions of Judaism. Topics include: God, the Jewish people, authority, ethics, the sacred and the profane, particularism and universalism.
PHIL261
Philosophy of the Environment
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Credit only granted for: HONR218F or PHIL261.
Formerly: HONR218F.
An evaluation of different kinds of arguments for the claim that the natural environment should be preserved. Perspectives cut across the disciplines of philosophy (environmental ethics and philosophies of nature); economics (cost-benefit analysis); and biology (evolution, ecology, environmental studies).
PHIL282
Free Will & Determinism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
A study of the main positions and arguments in the free will debate in contemporary analytic philosophy.
PHIL417
The Golden Age of Jewish Philosophy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: 3 credits in PHIL courses; or permission of ARHU-Meyerhoff Program & Center for Jewish Studies; or permission of ARHU-Philosophy department.
Cross-listed with JWST452. Credit only granted for: JWST452 or PHIL417.
Jewish philosophy from Maimonides in the 12th century to the expulsion of the Jews from Spain at the end of the 15th century. Topics include the limitations of human knowledge, creation of the world, foreknowledge and free will, and the existence of God.
PORT
Portuguese Department Site
PORT332
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with FILM332.
Credit only granted for: PORT332, FILM332, or PORT378.
Formerly: PORT378.
Brazilian films from the late 1950s to the present with a special view to the relationship between cinema, society, historical dates, and social changes in Brazil. Taught in English.
RELS
Religious Studies
RELS170
Greek and Roman Mythology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with CLAS170.
Credit only granted for: CLAS170 or RELS170.
Additional information: This course cannot be taken for language credit.
An introduction to the mythology of ancient Greece and Rome. This course is particularly recommended for students planning to major in foreign languages, English, history, the fine arts, or journalism. Taught in English.
RELS219A
Religions of the Ancient Near East
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: JWST225, HIST219I.
Credit only granted for: JWST225, HIST219I, or RELS219A.
Introduction to ancient Near Eastern religious systems and mythology, from the third millennium BCE through the fourth century BCE. Particular emphasis on Mesopotamia and ancient Israel.
RELS219C
Inventing Traditions: The Making of Rabbinic Judaism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HIST281, JWST230.
Credit only granted for: HIST281 or JWST230.
Introduces the dramatic literary and cultural (as well as political and demographic) innovations that reshaped Judaism in late antiquity. Examines the fundamental works and genres of rabbinic literature and the religious movement that produced them. Special emphasis on the rabbinic uses of "tradition" to enhance authority and legitimacy, and to foster group identity.
Cross-listed with HIST281 and JWST230. Credit granted for HIST281, JWST230, or RELS219C.

Introduces the dramatic literary and cultural (as well as political and demographic) innovations that reshaped Judaism in late antiquity. Examines the fundamental works and genres of rabbinic literature and the religious movement that produced them. Special emphasis on the rabbinic uses of "tradition" to enhance authority and legitimacy, and to foster group identity.
RELS250
Fundamental Concepts of Judaism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with JWST250, PHIL234.
Credit only granted for: JWST250, PHIL234, or RELS250.
A conceptional introduction to Judaism, analyzing its fundamental concepts from both analytical and historical perspectives. Discussion of "normative" Judaism as well as other conceptions of Judaism. Topics include: God, the Jewish people, authority, ethics, the sacred and the profane, particularism and universalism.
RELS289I
What is Religion?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVCC, SCIS
Draws upon examples from a wide variety of religious traditions to explore the question of what religion is and how to best understand it. Engagement with diverse approaches to religion including phenomenology and the study of "the sacred"; sociology and the study of religious communities; and questions of religious experience, ritual, and identity formation.
RELS419R
Advanced Topics in Religious Studies; Tradition and Change:Jewish Religion in the Modern World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with JWST347 and HIST429X. Credit granted for JWST347, RELS419R, or HIST429X.

An exploration of the history of the different modern Jewish religious movements that developed in Europe, starting with messianic movements and ending with Reform and Orthodoxy. Emphasis will be placed on the influence of the academic study of Judaism on the development of modern Jewish religious ideologies and practices.
SLLC
School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures Department Site
SLLC286
Living the Good Life: Chinese Philosophy in the Modern World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Additional information: Taught in English.
Confucius, Mencius, Zhuangzi and other Chinese thinkers who lived more than 2,000 years ago would argue that the contemporary Western emphasis on self-discovery (Find yourself) and self-acceptance has led you astray. See what they have to say and discuss what relevance it has for the modern world as we study how early Chinese thinkers wrestled with questions of existence, morality, and governance. No previous knowledge of Chinese philosophy and history will be assumed and no prerequisites are required. We will discuss ideas that are both historical and relevant to students' lives. What is "the Way"? How do we cultivate spontaneity? Is there a stable self? How can we be more alive? These are questions important for ancient kings but also for UMD students choosing a major, or wondering how ARHU can benefit them.
SLLC299J
Mythology of the Oppressed
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Examination of universality in human myths and what could account for it. Insights from cultural and literary studies, art history, linguistics, cognitive psychology, paleoanthropology, population dynamics and other such disciplines in the humanities and the social sciences are brought to bear on the question. Students will take a hands-on approach to mythologies within their local environment, attempting to place them within the context of other mythologies and what commonalities may reveal abouttheir society and the human mind.
SPAN
Spanish Department Site
SPAN207
Reading and Writing in Spanish
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: Must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in SPAN204; or must have appropriate Foreign Language Placement Test (FLPT) score.
Selected readings with emphasis on reading comprehension and the development of reading strategies. Work in composition writing and a review of selected grammatical topics. Complements material of SPAN204.
SPAN235
Issues in Latin American Studies II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with PORT235, LASC235.
Credit only granted for: LASC235, PORT235, or SPAN235.
Major issues shaping Latin American and Caribbean societies including the changing constructions of race, ethnicity, gender and class as well as expressions of popular cultures and revolutionary practices. A continuation of SPAN/PORT/LASC234, but completion of 234 is not a prerequisite. Taught in English.
SPAN303
Approaches to Cultural Materials in the Hispanic World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: SPAN301.
Recommended: May elect to take SPAN311 and/or SPAN316 in same semester as SPAN303.
Development of proficiency in critical thought through the reading, viewing, and analytical discussion of major genres and styles of cultural materials selected from Spanish-speaking world. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN332
Spanish Culture, Civilization and Literature II: Renaissance and Baroque
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: SPAN303; and (SPAN311 or SPAN316).
An overview of cultural and literary production of Spain from the late 15th through late 17th centuries, exploring the production of literary texts in their socio-historical, political, religious and cultural contexts and development. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN333
Spanish Culture, Civilization and Literature III: Modern Times
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: SPAN303; and (SPAN311 or SPAN316).
An overview of cultural and literary production of Spain from the late 17th century through the present day, exploring the production of literary texts in their socio-historical, political, religious and cultural contexts and development. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN362
Latin American Literatures and Cultures II: From Independence to Nation Formation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Prerequisite: SPAN303; and (SPAN311 or SPAN316).
An overview of cultural and literary production of Latin America from the 18th Century to approximately 1900, exploring the production of literary texts in their socio-historical, political, and cultural contexts and development. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN363
Latin American Literatures and Cultures III: From Modernism to Neo-Liberalism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Prerequisite: SPAN303; and (SPAN311 or SPAN316).
An overview of cultural and literary production of Latin America from the late 19th through the early 21st centuries, exploring the production of literary texts in their socio-historical, political, and cultural contexts and development. Taught in Spanish.
THET
Theatre Department Site
THET110
Introduction to the Theatre
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
In the age of pop music and blockbuster films, of memes and viral videos, we often forget that theatre was one of the original forms of popular entertainment. We will focus on theatre practitioners including actors, directors, designers and backstage personnel to understand how theatre is produced. We will also consider popular entertainment in Europe and America, with a particular focus on musical theatre and Broadway to explore how theatre communicates, resonates, and remains relevant to all audiences.
THET251
Broadway Mashup: Remixing America Through Musical Theater
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Interrogate musical theater's political history, investigating how this uniquely American genre uses narrative, song, and dance to weave critical differences across race, ethnicity, immigration status, religion, gender, sexuality, and ability into our national fabric.