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Courses - Fall 2021
AASP
African American Studies Department Site
AASP100
Introduction to African American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Significant aspects of the history of African Americans with particular emphasis on the evolution and development of black communities from slavery to the present. Interdisciplinary introduction to social, political, legal and economic roots of contemporary problems faced by blacks in the United States with applications to the lives of other racial and ethnic minorities in the Americas and in other societies.
AASP100H
Introduction to African American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Significant aspects of the history of African Americans with particular emphasis on the evolution and development of black communities from slavery to the present. Interdisciplinary introduction to social, political, legal and economic roots of contemporary problems faced by blacks in the United States with applications to the lives of other racial and ethnic minorities in the Americas and in other societies.
AASP101
Public Policy and the Black Community
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
Formerly: AASP300.
The impact of public policies on the black community and the role of the policy process in affecting the social, economic and political well-being of minorities. Particular attention given to the post-1960 to present era.
AASP202
Black Culture in the United States
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
The course examines important aspects of African American life and thought which are reflected in African American literature, drama, music and art. Beginning with the cultural heritage of slavery, the course surveys the changing modes of black creative expression from the 19th-century to the present.
AASP202H
Black Culture in the United States
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
The course examines important aspects of African American life and thought which are reflected in African American literature, drama, music and art. Beginning with the cultural heritage of slavery, the course surveys the changing modes of black creative expression from the 19th-century to the present.
AAST
Asian American Studies Department Site
AAST200
Introduction to Asian American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AMST298C.
Credit only granted for: AAST200 or AMST298C.
The aggregate experience of Asian Pacific Americans, from developments in the countries of origin to their contemporary issues. The histories of Asian Pacific American groups as well as culture, politics, the media, and stereotypes, viewed from an interdisciplinary perspective.
AAST201
Asian American History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with HIST221.
Credit only granted for: AAST201 or HIST221.
Introduction to the history of Asian Americans and Asians in the United States and the Americas and to the field of Asian American Studies, from an interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include theories of race and ethnicity; Asian migration and diaspora to the Americas; Asian American work and labor issues; gender, family, and communities; nationalism and nativism, and anti-Asian movements; Asian Americans in World War II, the Cold War, and the issues in the civil rights & post-civil rights era.
AAST222
Immigration and Ethnicity in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: AAST222 or HIST222.
The history of immigration and the development of diverse populations in the United States are examined. Topics include related political controversies, the social experiences of immigrants, ethnicity, generations, migration, inter-group relations, race and diversity in American culture.
AAST310
Introduction to Comparative Ethnic and Racial Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AMST310.
Credit only granted for: AMST310, AAST398F, AAST310, or AMST328L.
Formerly: AMST328L and AAST398F.
Introduces students to the study of race and ethnicity in the United States. The class is organized according to the following five units: (1) Introduction; (2) Key concepts; (3) Mechanisms of racial formation; (4) Prevailing myths about race; and (5) Contemporary issues related to race and ethnicity. Through readings, film clips, and presentations, we will explore how the concept of race has developed and endured over time and become familiar with key concepts, such as "race" and "intersectionality". We will attempt to better understand how race is associated with other forms of difference, such as class, gender and ethnicity. We will identify and confront the prevailing myths about race and ethnicity in the United States. Finally, we examine the ways in which contemporary issues reveal the dynamics of race and ethnicity.
AAST363
Filipino American History and Biography
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AMST323.
Credit only granted for: AAST363, AMST323, AAST398D, or AMST328J.
Formerly: AAST398D.
Focus is placed on Filipino American experiences with an emphasis on identity, community building and organizing to influence public policy We will cover pertinent events from the US and Philippine history in order to understand the impact of colonialism, migration, immigration and assimilation on Filipino Americans.
AAST443
Asian American Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AMST498J.
Credit only granted for: AAST498T, AAST443, GVPT368C or AMST 498J.
Formerly: AAST498T.
Students will gain a greater understanding of 1)the role of Asian Americans in US politics, 2) the political attitudes and behaviors of Asian Americans and 3)how to conduct research on Asian American politics. Though the class will concentrate on Asian Americans, issues related to Asian American politics will be examined within the larger context of America's multicultural political landscape.
AGST
Agricultural Science and Technology
AGST130
Did Yeast Create Civilization?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Recommended: CHEM103, CHEM131, CHEM135, or CHEM146.
Cross-listed with: PLSC130.
Credit only granted for: AGST130 or PLSC130.
Fermented foods have played a major role in the transition from nomadic to settled agrarian societies, the establishment of social and religious customs, the expansion of empires, and modern economies. To what extent are our past and current attitudes towards fermented foods rooted in historical and cultural imprints? Explore the central role of fermentation in human history and culture, the basic microbiological processes underlying fermentation processes, and the processes used to produce and distribute fermented foods. Find out how the fruits, grains, and dairy products used to produce fermented foods are grown and selected. Students will learn about the development and modern use of fermented dairy products, pickles, bread, tea, chocolate, wine, beer, distilled liquors, and pharmaceutical/manufactured products.
There will be 5 required live synchronous meetings via Zoom througout the semester. Please see instructor for details.

There will be a required live/synchronous meeting on the first week of classes via Zoom on Monday, 8/30/2021 at 5pm. If there is a time change to the meeting time, this will be communicated via ELMS.
AMST
American Studies Department Site
AMST202
Cultures of Everyday Life in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Examine the structures and patterns of everyday life in the U.S., utilizing methods such as ethnography, oral history, survey research, and textual, visual, and material cultural analysis.
AMST298C
Introduction to Asian American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AAST200.
Credit only granted for: AAST200 or AMST298C.
The aggregate experience of Asian Pacific Americans, from developments in the countries of origin to their contemporary issues. The histories of Asian Pacific American groups as well as culture, politics, the media, and stereotypes, viewed from an interdisciplinary perspective.
AMST310
Introduction to Comparative Ethnic and Racial Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AAST310.
Credit only granted for: AMST310, AAST398F, AAST310, or AMST328L.
Formerly: AMST328L and AAST398F.
Introduces students to the study of race and ethnicity in the United States. The class is organized according to the following five units: (1) Introduction; (2) Key concepts; (3) Mechanisms of racial formation; (4) Prevailing myths about race; and (5) Contemporary issues related to race and ethnicity. Through readings, film clips, and presentations, we will explore how the concept of race has developed and endured over time and become familiar with key concepts, such as "race" and "intersectionality". We will attempt to better understand how race is associated with other forms of difference, such as class, gender and ethnicity. We will identify and confront the prevailing myths about race and ethnicity in the United States. Finally, we examine the ways in which contemporary issues reveal the dynamics of race and ethnicity.
AMST498J
Asian American Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AAST443.
Credit only granted for: AAST498T, AAST443, GVPT368C or AMST 498J.
Formerly: AAST498T.
Students will gain a greater understanding of 1)the role of Asian Americans in US politics, 2) the political attitudes and behaviors of Asian Americans and 3)how to conduct research on Asian American politics. Though the class will concentrate on Asian Americans, issues related to Asian American politics will be examined within the larger context of America's multicultural political landscape.
ANTH
Anthropology Department Site
ANTH210
Introduction to Medical Anthropology and Global Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
An introduction to the central concepts in medical anthropology and the anthropology of global health. This course is a survey of anthropological notions of health, disease, and the body in cross-cultural and global contexts, including classic and contemporary texts. It will provide an examination of systems of knowledge and practice with regard to illness, healing, and global health inequities.
ANTH240
Introduction to Archaeology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Exploration of the variety of past human societies and cultures through archaeology, from the emergence of anatomically modern humans to the more recent historical past.
ANTH263
Sexuality and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: ANTH298K or ANTH263.
Formerly: ANTH298K.
An overview of sexuality from an anthropological perspective, looking at aspects of sexuality within our own culture and in cultures around the world. Course topics include the biology and culture of sex, gender, physical attraction, sexual orientation, marriage and mating taboos, fertility control, sexually transmitted diseases, and commercial aspects of sex.
ANTH264
Immigration Policy, Immigrant Lives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: IMMR219C.
Credit only granted for: ANTH264 or IMMR219C.
An examination of the phenomenon of international migration, or immigration. Students develop awareness of how immigration has been framed in the general public and examined by social science disciplines, most prominently anthropology. Examination of case studies of different immigrant groups in distinct geographic contexts will illuminate the varied incorporation experiences of immigrants into U.S. society.
Cross-listed with IMMR219C. Credit granted for ANTH264 or IMMR219C.
ANTH265
Anthropology of Global Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
An overview of the growing field of global health including health care systems, medical practices, ideas about illness in cross-cultural contexts, issues of health development, global health inequity, and human rights issues. The course will focus on the history of global health, the critique of major international health agencies and their development paradigms, and the political economy of social inequalities and health.
ANTH266
Changing Climate, Changing Cultures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Explore past, present, and future interactions between humans and climate. Discussions, methods-oriented activities, and case study analyses provide students a foundation for appreciating the role of anthropology in understanding, responding to, and preparing for climate change.
ANTH305
Archaeological Methods and Practice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS
Prerequisite: ANTH240, ARTH200, or CLAS180.
Cross-listed with: ARTH305, CLAS305, JWST319Y.
Credit only granted for: ANTH305, ARTH305, CLAS305, or JWST319Y.
A team-taught, interdisciplinary course discussing theories, methods, and ethical issues in the practice of archaeology.
ANTH323
Plagues, Pathogens and Public Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ANTH429A or ANTH323.
Formerly: ANTH429A.
The impact of diseases on populations from prehistoric times through the present will be examined, along with public perceptions of disease, scientific breakthroughs on treatment and prevention, and the ways that politics and public health policies can enhance or impede the advancement of disease treatment. The natural history of disease, population structure, and immunity will be discussed. The class will address emerging and re-emerging diseases and the ways that first responders, researchers, and policy makers may affect the outcome of an outbreak.
AREC
Agricultural and Resource Economics Department Site
AREC250
Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Credit only granted for: ECON200, AREC240 or AREC250.
An introduction to economic principles of production, marketing, agricultural prices and incomes, farm labor, credit, agricultural policies, and government programs.
AREC260
The Science of Gender in Economics and Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Recommended: Completion of introductory statistics recommended but not required.
Describes the process by which various scientific disciplines, including anthropology, evolutionary biology, psychology and economics do research on the topic of gender. We will examine the current state of the literature on the reason why different sexes exist and how sex translates into gender across different societies today. With a better understand of the source of gender, we will examine how researchers are learning about the reasons behind the highly divergent economic outcomes for men and women today. The class will discuss these issues in the context of the labor market in developed countries like the US (why are there fewer women in high paying STEM jobs?, for example) and in the context of a wide variety of markets in developing countries (what role do women play in agriculture, health and politics?, for example). A particular focus of the class will be on techniques for learning more about the underlying reasons for these differences, how they can be overcome and whether women play a special role in improving economic outcomes in the poorest parts of the world.
ARTH
Art History & Archaeology Department Site
ARTH305
Archaeological Methods and Practice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS
Prerequisite: ANTH240, ARTH200, or CLAS180.
Cross-listed with: ANTH305, CLAS305, JWST319Y.
Credit only granted for: ANTH305, ARTH305, CLAS305, or JWST319Y.
A team-taught, interdisciplinary course discussing theories, methods, and ethical issues in the practice of archaeology.
BSGC
Global Communities
BSGC101
(Perm Req)
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must be in Global Communities Living-Learning program.
An interdisciplinary exploration of the historical evolution and contemporary significance of growing interconnectedness in the world. We debate different perspectives on globalization and its impact on social, political, economic and cultural issues.
BSOS
Behavioral and Social Sciences
BSOS201
Ensuring your Financial Future Through Stock Investing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: BSOS289I or BSOS201.
Formerly: BSOS289I.
Additional information: No prior knowledge of the stock market or investing is expected or required.
Introduces students to investing and trading, with special emphasis on the field of technical analysis. Planning for one's financial future is a critical skill for all students. Students will learn how to evaluate companies using the investors.com website and the TC2000 stock charting program. Students will develop an idea of the risks and benefits of investing, establishing a savings strategy, opening an IRA, and strategically planning for future financial security. In addition to readings, lectures, and online videos, students will participate in virtual stock market trading exercises and manage a virtual account.
BSST
Terrorism Studies
BSST334
States of Emergency
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Students will explore the manner in which crises unfold from the perspective of a variety of emergency response disciplines, including: emergency management, law enforcement, intelligence analysis, cyber analysis, risk communication, health and human services, and emergency psychiatry/psychology. Students will participate in a semester-long simulation of an unfolding terrorist attack.
CCJS
Criminology and Criminal Justice Department Site
CCJS100
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Introduction to the administration of criminal justice in a democratic society, with emphasis on the theoretical and historical development of law enforcement. The principles of organization and administration for law enforcement; functions and specific activities; planning and research; public relations; personnel and training; inspection and control; direction; policy formulation.
CCJS105
Introduction to Criminology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Criminal behavior and the methods of its study; causation; typologies of criminal acts and offenders; punishment, correction and incapacitation; prevention of crime.
CCJS225
Responses to Violence
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
Conflict is unfortunately resolved through violence in a number of settings. It ranges from interpersonal to international in its scope. This course investigates the strengths and weakness of a number of resolutions to reducing violence over the course of history using both state centered and informal control.
CCJS325
Slavery in the Twenty First Century: Combating Human Trafficking
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: CCJS325 or CCJS498R.
Formerly: CCJS498R.
The trafficking of human beings in its historical, legal, economic, political and social contexts. Scope of the global problem, different forms of human trafficking, and regional trends and practices. Roles of government, the international community and individual actors. Strategies to combat trafficking.
CHSE
Counseling, Higher Education, and Special Education
CHSE205
Disability: From Stigma and Sideshow to Mainstream and Main Street
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: EDSP289I or CHSE205.
Formerly: EDSP289I.
Explores the cultural, historical, educational, and medical roots of difference among human beings and examines the impact of cultural and technological changes on individuals traditionally identified as disabled. The course is designed to develop a broad understanding of the concept of "disability" and the emerging technologies that shape contemporary understanding of this phenomenon and the lives of those considered disabled.
CLAS
Classics Department Site
CLAS180
Discovering the World of Ancient Greece
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU
An exploration of the cultural traits and developments of ancient Greek civilization and its forerunners, from the Bronze Age Mycenaeans and Minoans, through the rise of the classical Greek city-states, to the expansion of Greek cultural influence in the wake of the conquests of Alexander the Great. Drawing upon the evidence of the archaeological remains as well as ancient historical and literary documents, students gain a basic familiarity with the principal monuments and artifacts of classical Greek civilization, the various institutions and values that characterized the Greeks, and the significant historical events that transformed the culture over the course of antiquity.
CLAS305
Archaeological Methods and Practice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS
Prerequisite: ANTH240, ARTH200, or CLAS180.
Cross-listed with: ANTH305, ARTH305, JWST319Y.
Credit only granted for: ANTH305, ARTH305, CLAS305, or JWST319Y.
A team-taught, interdisciplinary course discussing theories, methods, and ethical issues in the practice of archaeology.
CLAS312
The Modernity of Athenian Democracy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU
Examines the question of how Ancient Greek thought can be a tool for facing the challenges of the modern world. Topics such as political participation and engagement in politics, lawfulness and justice, freedom and autonomy, democracy and civic responsibility are found at the core of Ancient Greek thought. In addition to these topics, the course explores, through the teachings of ancient Greek philosophers, historians, and poets, the questions of virtue and happiness at a personal level and the pursuit of happiness at the societal level. Love and friendship are necessary virtues to shape a harmonious and prosperous polis. By studying selected excerpts from the primary sources of Ancient Greek literature in translation, the course defines the core values of democratic society from the viewpoint of the Greeks.
CLAS331
Roman Religion: From Jupiter to Jesus
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU
Formerly: CLAS309J.
Survey of the major institutions of Roman state and private religion and of the diverse religions, including Judaism and Christianity, practiced in the Roman empire.
CPMS
College Park Scholars-Media, Self and Society
CPMS225
Analyzing Media Practice through Theory
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Prerequisite: CPMS100.
Restriction: Must be in the Scholars Media, Self & Society Program.
Formerly: CPSP222.
Media analysis investigating patterns of ownership, the working of media organizations, patterns of coverage and the nature of audiences.
CPSS
College Park Scholars-Science, Technology and Society
CPSS225
College Park Scholars Capstone: Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Prerequisite: CPSS100.
Restriction: Must be in the College Park Scholars Science, Technology & Society (CPSS) program.
Formerly: CPSP227.
Exploration and understanding of ways science and technology shape and are shaped by society.
ECON
Economics Department Site
ECON111
Thinking Like an Economist
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Sophomore standing or lower; or permission of BSOS-Economics department.
An introduction to the modes of thought of economics. Use of simple standard tools of economics to analyze important problems that arise frequently in public policy, the news media, and in daily life. An emphasis on how economists predict what choices societies make and how economists analyze whether those are good choices. Practical application of a variety of economic tools leading to a focus on the essential unity underlying these analytical tools, viewing economics as a discipline that applies a core methodology in different ways in different situations.
ECON175
Inequality: Determinants and Policy Remedies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
History shows that the gap between the rich and the poor has varied over time within and between countries, most recently seeming to increase within many countries while somewhat decreasing between countries. This course challenges students to investigate why people make different amounts of money, why income inequality has changed dramatically in recent years, what public policy tools exist to counter inequality increases, and what different institutional arrangements different countries use to lower inequality. This course will introduce students to theoretical tools used by economists to understand the sources of inequality and will also examine various empirical measures of inequality.
ECON181
Putting a Price on the Environment: An Economist's Perspective on Sustainability
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
How does society balance the benefits of environmental protection and preservation against the costs? Though some might say that the environment is priceless, economists recognize that every action involves trade-offs. This course investigates sustainability through comparing costs and benefits. From this perspective, other questions arise: How can we design policies that incentivize sustainable choices? Why might usual market functioning fail to achieve sustainability? Do we need to put a price on the environment in order to protect it? How do we measure an economy's "success"? This course explores the answers to these and other related questions from an economist's perspective.
ECON200
Principles of Microeconomics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Prerequisite: MATH107 or MATH110; or must have math eligibility of MATH113 or higher.
Credit only granted for: ECON200, AREC240, or AREC250.
Additional information: It is recommended that students complete ECON200 before taking ECON201.
Introduces economic models used to analyze economic behavior by individuals and firms and consequent market outcomes. Applies conceptual analysis to several policy issues and surveys a variety of specific topics within the broad scope of microeconomics.
ECON201
Principles of Macroeconomics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Prerequisite: MATH107 or MATH110; or must have math eligibility of MATH113 or higher.
Recommended: ECON200.
Credit only granted for: ECON201 or ECON205.
An introduction to how market economies behave at the aggregate level. The determination of national income/output and the problems of unemployment inflation, will be examined, along with monetary and fiscal policy.
EDCP
Education Counseling and Personnel Services Department Site
EDCP230
The Science and Practice of Happiness and Psychological Well-Being
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP
An introduction to theory and research on positive psychology, subjective well-being, and the psychology of happiness. This will include examination of hedonic and eudaimonic models of well-being and sociocultural understandings of happiness, together with how it relates to health, relationships, money, religion, work, and social media. Students will also explore common misconceptions and myths about happiness and well-being and will engage in a variety of activities designed to deepen their understanding of happiness in their own lives and broader societal trends related to well-being.
EDHD
Education, Human Development Department Site
EDHD201
Learning How to Learn
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS
Immerses students in the theoretical and empirical study of learning by engaging them in orchestrated experiences and activities drawn directly from the disciplinary research. Students achieve deep understanding of their own learning, as well as the means of enhancing that learning both in school and out-of-school contexts.
EDHD210
(Perm Req)
Foundations of Early Childhood Education
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS
Restriction: Permission of EDUC-Human Development and Quantitative Methodology department.
Students explore historical and current research in early childhood education, primary models of curriculum and pedagogy in the field, and the relationship between critical aspects of young children's development and the creation of inclusive learning opportunities for all children, including children at risk. The concept of developmentally appropriate practice and its application across different developmental levels and early childhood classrooms will be introduced and connected with discussion in EDHD220 and EDSP211. Students examine issues in developing and implementing high quality early childhood education experiences for young children with and without disabilities, including the influence of family, culture, and community, the needs of children at risk (e.g., poverty, immigrant status, English Language Learners), and the role of assessment in early learning.
EDHD230
Human Development and Societal Institutions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Development of the individual in the context of relationships with the formal and informal institutions of society. An examination of various aspects of development from the broad perspective of the social sciences.
EDHD310
Your Brain on Education: The Neuroscience of Learning and Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Prerequisite: PSYC100.
Investigation linking research in the brain science of learning and development, including the neural basis of academic skills, to achievement, disability, and broader applications to classroom learning. This course will focus on areas of education including language (spoken and written), conceptual change, numerical/quantitative processing, and social cognition as well as burgeoning areas of neuroscientific research in general cognitive processes such as attention, memory, and executive processing. These topics will be discussed with respect to typical and atypical development with some focus on developmental disabilities including autism, specific language impairment, reading and math impairment, and attention deficit disorders among others. This course will focus on both the theoretical perspectives and pragmatic issues of how evidence regarding brain development can or may be translated into useful or misleading information for educators, professionals, and parents/guardians of our children.
EDHD320
Human Development Through the Life Span
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Central concepts related to parameters of human development, individual and social, which arise throughout the life span. Continuity and change within the developing individual.
EDHD411
Child Growth and Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Theoretical approaches to and empirical studies of physical, psychological and social development from conception to puberty. Implications for home, school and community.
EDHD412
Infant Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Infant development across domains, including perceptual, motor, cognitive, language, social and emotional functioning from pre-natal through third year of life.
EDHD413
Adolescent Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS
Adolescent development, including special problems encountered in contemporary culture. Observational component and individual case study.
EDHD460
Educational Psychology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Prerequisite: PSYC100; or permission of EDUC-Human Development and Quantitative Methodology department.
Application of psychology to learning processes and theories. Individual differences, measurement, motivation, emotions, intelligence, attitudes, problem solving, thinking and communicating in educational settings.
ENCE
Engineering, Civil Department Site
ENCE204
How Do Cities Work
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Can we improve the way cities work? Are we equitably sharing the benefits and the burdens of living in a city? This course examines how cities work, and importantly, whether they work the same for everyone living in the city. We will explore the ways in which we provide city services and who is included or excluded from these services. We will examine how the city infrastructure serves a neighborhood's residents, with an eye toward how community forms. We will use first person accounts from policymakers, advocates, and community members to learn about the planning process for services and the tensions that can exist around access to healthcare, food and affordable housing. Each week we will study a new facet of the city, drawing on the writings of experts and your own journey through the city to better understand its infrastructure, asking how does it work, how does it connect to other infrastructure and whom does it primarily serve?
Restricted to students in Carillon Communities.
FMSC
Family Science Department Site
FMSC110
Families and Global Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC
Students will explore, define, and study global health, social determinants of health, health inequalities, gender inequality, family violence, and maternal and child health using a global perspective.
FMSC110S
Families and Global Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC
Students will explore, define, and study global health, social determinants of health, health inequalities, gender inequality, family violence, and maternal and child health using a global perspective.
FMSC170
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: FMSC170 or FMSC298F.
Formerly: FMSC298F.
Examination of current trends and controversial issues in family life, including issues of marriage, reproductive technologies, adoption, child custody, remarriage, and marital violence.
FMSC190
Man Up! Where Are The Fathers?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
An examination of changing fatherhood roles, health, and inequality in diverse families. Focus will be on masculinities and disparities among men by race and class; provider role expectations; and trauma and violence faced by men in contemporary society.
FMSC260
Couple Relationships
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Credit only granted for: FMSC260 or FMST260.
Formerly: FMST260.
Couple relationships and their alternatives in contemporary dating, courtship and marriage.
Restricted to Majors or non-majors with less than or equal to 60 credits.
FMSC302
Research Methods in Family Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP
Prerequisite: Must have completed an introductory statistics course.
Restriction: Must be in a major within SPHL-Family Science department.
Credit only granted for: FMSC302 or FMST302.
Formerly: FMST302.
Introduction to the methods of the social and behavioral sciences employed in family science. The role of theory, the development of hypotheses, measurement, design, and data analysis.
FMSC330
Family Theories and Patterns
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Restriction: Junior standing or higher.
Credit only granted for: FMSC330 or FMST330.
Formerly: FMST330.
Theory and research on the family, including a cross-cultural analysis of family patterns.
FMSC332
Children in Families
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Prerequisite: PSYC100 or FMSC105.
Credit only granted for: FMSC332 or FMST332.
Formerly: FMST332.
A family life education approach to the study of children and families. Emphasis on the interaction of children with parents, siblings, extended kin, and the community.
FMSC381
Poverty, Affluence, and Families
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Prerequisite: SOCY100 or SOCY105.
Restriction: Must be in a major within SPHL-Family Science department.
Credit only granted for: FMSC381 or FMST381.
Formerly: FMST381.
Social, political, cultural and economic factors influencing income and wealth in American families.
FMSC460
Violence in Families
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Prerequisite: SOCY100, SOCY105, or PSYC100.
Credit only granted for: FMSC460 or FMST460.
Formerly: FMST460.
Theories of child, spouse, and elder abuse in the family setting. Emphasis on historical, psychological, sociological and legal trends relating to physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. Introduction to methods for prevention and remediation.
GEOG
Geographical Sciences Department Site
GEOG110
The World Today: Global Perspectives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
The most critical issue facing the world today is the sustainability of both human and physical systems in the 21st century. This class uses the context of regions of the world to explore the 21st century issues of climate change, development, politics, economy, and demography. Each region will be used to highlight aspects of sustainability.
GEOG202
Introduction to Human Geography
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC
Introduction to what geographers do and how they do it. Systematic study of issues regarding social and cultural systems from a global to a local scale. Looks at the distribution of these variables and answers the question "Why here, and not there"?
GEOG330
As the World Turns: Society and Sustainability in a Time of Great Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: GEOG330, GEOG360, or GEOG362.
Formerly: GEOG362.
Cultural geography course on society and sustainability. Culture is the basic building block that is key to sustainability of societies. Course will cover sustainability of societies on different scales, examining local, regional, and worldwide issues. Sustainability will be examined as a key element of environmental sustainability. How societies adjust to rapid world change will be examined as a positive and/or negative factor in sustainability.
GVPT
Government and Politics Department Site
GVPT170
American Government
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
A comprehensive study of national government in the United States.
GVPT200
International Political Relations
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
A study of the major factors underlying international relations, the causes of conflict and cooperation among international actors, the role of international institutions, the interactions of domestic and foreign policies, and major issues in security, economy and the environment.
GVPT202
Politics, Constitutional Policy, and the Institution of the U.S. Supreme Court
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
A thorough examination of the U.S. Supreme Court in the American political system. Focusing on the Court as an institution-the set of norms, rules, and policymaking processes that lead to the Supreme Court's decisions-and how justices' decision-making processes critically determine substantive legal policy and the meaning of the U.S. Constitution.
GVPT204
Uncertain Partners: US and China in a Changing World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: GVPT204 or GVPT289J.
Formerly: GVPT289J.
The rapid ascent of the People's Republic of China (PRC) as a major political and economic power has meant that its relationship with the United States has become central in contemporary international politics. To an increasing extent, some of the biggest global challenges--ranging from nuclear proliferation, to climate change, to economic growth--require U.S.-China cooperation if they are to be managed effectively. Yet the U.S.-China relationship is at times turbulent, and its future remains highly uncertain. Will the U.S. and China be able to forge a closer partnership that will enable them to cooperate in dealing with some of the vexing challenges facing the international community? Or are they more likely to drift toward a more adversarial relationship, as China's growing power--and the US reaction--generate a vicious cycle of mutual mistrust? In this class, students will grapple with these questions as they learn about the history of U.S.-China relations, and about many of the current issues facing the relationship.
HACS
ACES-Cybersecurity
HACS208P
Seminar in Cybersecurity; Beyond Technology, the Policy Implications of Cyberspace
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living Learning Program.
HESI
Higher Ed, Student Affairs, and International Ed Policy
HESI202
Race and Diversity in Higher Education
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Will discuss contemporary and controversial issues on race and diversity in higher education. Addresses the question: How should race influence college admissions and campus climate? Will expose students to different viewpoints on the role of race in higher education settings.
HESP
Hearing and Speech Sciences Department Site
HESP120
Introduction to Linguistics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP
Additional information: HESP120 is required for HESP majors. HESP majors may not substitute LING200.
An introduction to the scientific study of natural language with focus on the basic concepts of phonology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics, with subsequent attention to the applied aspects of linguistic principles.
HESP214
The Research Behind Headlines on Words, Thought, and Behavior
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HNUH278A.
Credit only granted for: HNUH278A or HESP214.
How does the human mind use language? Type "Language Science News" into your Google search bar. Among the more than 3 billion hits, headlines like "What is love? It depends what language you speak" and "Science's English dominance hinders diversity" invite you to think about the impact of words on thought and behavior. These are stories about how humans acquire and use language, but they ultimately address big questions about how we experience knowledge itself. In a world of unprecedented access to science journalism, did you ever read a headline about human behavior and wonder: How do we know? This class takes up the elegant ways cognitive scientists design experiments to answer crucial questions about language and thought, brain and behavior, that have no intuitive answers. Students will dive deep into the media coverage of their favorite claims about what we know, debate the psychological science behind these claims, and develop transferable critical-thinking skills in the process.
HIST
History Department Site
HIST106
American Jewish Experience
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with JWST141.
Credit only granted for: HIST106 or JWST141.
History of the Jews in America from colonial times to the present. Emphasis on the waves of migration from Germany and Eastern Europe; the changing nature of the American Jewish community and its participation in American social, economic, and political life.
HIST108C
Martin Luther King Jr.
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
Cross-listed with: AASP298M, AMST189C.
Credit only granted for: HIST108C, AASP298M, or AMST189C.
Examines the life and work of Martin Luther King, Jr. We immediately rethink the image of King who liberals and conservatives construct as a dreamer of better race relations. We engage the complexities of an individual, who articulated a moral compass of the nation, to explore racial justice in post-World War II America. This course gives special attention to King's post-1965 radicalism when he called for a reordering of American society, an end to the war in Vietnam, and supported sanitation workers striking for better wages and working conditions. Topics include King's notion of the "beloved community", the Social Gospel, liberalism, "socially conscious democracy", militancy, the politics of martyrdom, poverty and racial justice, and compensatory treatment. Primary sources form the core of our readings.
HIST111
The Medieval World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
The development of Europe in the Middle Ages; the role of religious values in shaping new social, economic, and political institutions; medieval literature, art and architecture.
HIST123
Sub-Saharan Africa Since 1800
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Overviews early mid-19th-century changes in African societies, European conquest and African resistances in the late 19th-century, colonial states and societies, African nationalisms and decolonization and the independence era. Struggles over social, economic, and political changes are emphasized.
HIST133
God Wills It! The Crusades in Medieval and Modern Perspectives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Cross-listed with: RELS133.
Credit only granted for: HIST133, RELS133 or RELS289D.
Formerly: RELS289D.
An examination of the identities and convictions both of the Western Europeans who participated in the Crusades and of the Easterners (Muslim, Christian, and Jewish) whom they encountered in the Holy Land. Focuses on the era of the first four great Crusades, from about 1095 to 1215. Consideration of the cultural impact of these movements on both Western Europe and the Middle East.
HIST135
Civil Discourse or Urban Riot: Why Cities Don't (Often) Explode
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: JWST289E.
Credit only granted for: HIST135 or JWST289E.
An examination of the mechanisms that promote peaceful co-existence in urban societies and a discussion of how and why city streets sometimes become violent.
Jointly offered with JWST289E. Credit granted for HIST135 or JWST289E.
HIST136
Moneyland: Business in American Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
An exploration of American business culture and institutions from colonial times to the present with emphasis on how inherited and acquired identities (social capital) have shaped Americans' experiences as entrepreneurs, managers, workers, and consumers.
HIST187
God, Land, Power, and the People: Moral Issues in the Jewish Historical Experience
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: JWST187.
Credit only granted for: HIST187 or JWST187.
Examines the complicated relationship between theology, nationalism, sovereignty, and the ethical exercise of social control using case studies drawn from the Jewish historical experience. The universal and age-old issues implicit in the exercise of power have gained special moral force for Jews with the creation of the State of Israel, a Jewish and a democratic state with substantial non-Jewish minorities and hundreds of thousands of non-citizen subjects. Can these be reconciled? Jewish efforts over the ages and in recent times to define justice provide concrete examples through which to examine and discuss crucial abstract principles.
HIST200
Interpreting American History: Beginnings to 1877
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU
Credit only granted for: HIST156 or HIST200.
Formerly: HIST156.
The United States from colonial times to the end of the Civil War. Establishment and development of American institutions.
HIST201
Interpreting American History: From 1865 to the Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: HIST157 or HIST201.
Formerly: HIST157.
The United States from the end of the Civil War to the present. Economic, social, intellectual, and political developments. Rise of industry and emergence of the United States as a world power.
HIST204
Introduction to the History of Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Credit only granted for: HIST174 or HIST204.
Formerly: HIST174.
An exploration of the roots of modern science from the ancient Greeks through the medieval and early modern periods. Focus on the men and women who helped to create the sciences and to change public perceptions of their disciplines.
HIST213
History of Sexuality in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Cross-listed with: WGSS298L.
Credit only granted for: HIST213, WMST298L or WGSS298L.
Explores the social construction of sexualities from the first colonial settlement to the modern era in the United States. Analyzes the implications of these understandings for power relations in U.S history.
HIST221
Asian American History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with AAST201.
Credit only granted for: AAST201 or HIST221.
Introduction to the history of Asian Americans in the United States and the Americas and to the field of Asian American Studies, from an interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include theories of race and ethnicity; Asian migration and diaspora to the Americas; Asian American work and labor issues; gender, family, and communities; nationalism and nativism, and anti-Asian movements; Asian Americans in World War II, the Cold War, and the issues in the civil rights & post-civil rights era.
HIST225
Modern Military History, 1815-Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
The military history of Europe through an examination of the economic, financial, strategic, tactical, and technological aspects of the development of military institutions and warfare from the Congress of Vienna in 1815 to the present.
HIST234
Invaders, Conquerors, Usurpers: A History of Pre-Modern Britain to 1485
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
British history from Roman times to the 15th century. The Anglo-Saxon, Scandinavian, and Norman invasions; the coming of Christianity; Magna Carta, the development of Parliament, legal institutions, and the Common Law; the decline of medieval kingship.
HIST236
From Peacocks to Punks: Modern Britain from 1688 to Today
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
British history from the Glorious Revolution of 1688 to the present. The revolution of 1688; the structure of 18th-century society and politics; economic and social change in the Industrial Revolution; 19th- and 20th-century political and social reform; imperialism; the impact of the First and Second World Wars on British society.
HIST237
Russian Civilization
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
An overview of Russian history stressing the main lines of development of the Russian state and the evolution of Russian culture to the present day.
HIST250
Colonial Latin America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with LASC250.
Credit only granted for: HIST250 or LASC250.
Introductory survey of the history of Latin America from pre-Columbian Indian cultures to the beginning of the wars for independence (ca. 1810), covering cultural, political, social, and economic developments. Major themes include conquest, colonialism, indigenous culture, African slavery, religion, race and ethnicity, and gender ideologies.
HIST266
The United States in World Affairs
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
A study of the United States as an emerging world power and the American response to changing status in world affairs. Emphasis on the relationship between internal and external development of the nation.
HIST289O
Lawlessness: From Pirates to Body-snatchers, Exploring the Legitimacy of Illicit Activity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Explores motives of and responses to the lawless behavior of pirates, body snatchers, bandits, vigilantes, smugglers and others worldwide from the 1500s to today.
HIST376
History of Modern Israel
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Cross-listed with ISRL342.
Credit only granted for: HIST376 or ISRL342.
History of modern Israel since the beginning of the Zionist settlement in 1882. Attention to different interpretations and narratives of Israel's history, including the historical and ideological roots of Zionism, the establishment of the State of Israel, ideological forces, wars, and the triumphs and crises of democracy.
HIST419Q
Before the Holocaust: The Golden Age of Eastern European Jewry
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: JWST370.
Credit only granted for: JWST419E, JWST370, or HIST419Q.
Formerly: JWST419E.
An exploration of the history of the Jews of Eastern Europe from the period of the Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth until the Holocaust. Topics to be covered include religious, political, social, and cultural transformation of Jewish life in Eastern Europe in the context of the general political changes in the area.
Jointly offered with JWST370. Credit granted for HIST419Q or JWST370.

An exploration of the history of the Jews of Eastern Europe from the period of the Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth until the Holocaust. Topics to be covered include religious, political, social, and cultural transformation of Jewish life in Eastern Europe in the context of the general political changes in the area.
HLTH
HLTH230
Introduction to Health Behavior
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Psychological, social psychological, and sociological approaches to the following health areas: development of health attitudes and behavior, patient-provider interaction and the organization of health care.
Restricted to Majors or non-majors with less than or equal to 45 credits.
HLTH234
Global Health Messages: Understanding Exposure & Impact
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in the Community Health program.
Using a global perspective, this course teaches students to be critical consumers of current and historical health communication interventions. It also provides students with the skills to develop media interventions that target specific and general populations. Students will discover the array of diverse media messages that influence the health and well-being of individuals and communities.
HLTH234H
(Perm Req)
Global Health Messages: Understanding Exposure & Impact
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in the Community Health program.
Using a global perspective, this course teaches students to be critical consumers of current and historical health communication interventions. It also provides students with the skills to develop media interventions that target specific and general populations. Students will discover the array of diverse media messages that influence the health and well-being of individuals and communities.
HLTH264
Tweets & Likes: Digital Health & Social Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in the Community Health program.
Examines the current and potential use of digital health and social media to influence public health. Provides an overview of knowledge, skills and terminology necessary to optimize the effectiveness of these technologies to contribute to the enhancement of individual and community health.
Restricted to non-community health majors.
HLTH264H
(Perm Req)
Tweets & Likes: Digital Health & Social Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in the Community Health program.
Examines the current and potential use of digital health and social media to influence public health. Provides an overview of knowledge, skills and terminology necessary to optimize the effectiveness of these technologies to contribute to the enhancement of individual and community health.
HLTH285
Controlling Stress and Tension
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Health problems related to stress and tension. Analysis of causative psychosocial stressors and intervening physiological mechanisms. Emphasis on prevention and control of stress through techniques such as biofeedback, meditation and neuromuscular relaxation.
HLTH285H
(Perm Req)
Controlling Stress and Tension
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Health problems related to stress and tension. Analysis of causative psychosocial stressors and intervening physiological mechanisms. Emphasis on prevention and control of stress through techniques such as biofeedback, meditation and neuromuscular relaxation.
HNUH
University Honors
HNUH218A
Pursuits of Happiness: Ordinary Lives in the American Revolution
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: HNUH218A or HIST137.
Dedicated to telling the stories of ordinary people in the American Revolution, to recovering the voices and experiences of all the founders of this country whose lives and contributions have been obscured by our tendency to worship a dozen or so well-to-do and well-educated men in suits as if they alone conceived and executed the American Revolution and the founding of the United States. So we'll be talking this semester about the marginalized, the downtrodden, the rank and file, the rabble - all the people who never make it onto monuments or money. The point of this is to allow us all to recognize the fundamental fact that fighting a Revolution is a collective act that requires a genuine mass movement. Declaring independence on a piece of parchment on a summer's day in Philadelphia in 1776 doesn't mean anything unless tens of thousands of people are willing to support that cause and fight to make it a reality. To revolt, then, is not an individual act - it's for crowds, for mobs, and for whole communities to do together. Declaring independence is a fundamentally cooperative act.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is the required I-Series class in the Revolution Cluster. HNUH218A will only be offered in Fall 2021 and in Winter Term (asynchronous, online) in January 2022."
HNUH219T
Transform Maryland: Theories and Models of Consulting
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS
Additional information: This course is part of a two-semester Theory & Practice Track seminar.
This consulting practicum theory course is designed to prepare students with the theoretical and practical background they need to engage in the art of consulting to make real change in the world. The broad number of topics covered make this course both challenging and rewarding, with concepts drawn from business, engineering, psychology, sociology, communications, literature, and more. These topics blend multiple academic disciplines into an analytical, systems, and abstract analysis approach to problem solving. Students will develop an understanding of organizations, how groups make decisions, and how one can influence those decisions. This is driven by the development of two parallel analysis techniques: quantitative and qualitative. The quantitative analysis techniques include such areas as systems design, data analysis, and process modeling. These are paired with qualitative techniques, including organizational analysis, decision modeling, and stakeholder analysis. This course is self-contained in that the topics covered are assessed within the course, but it is paired with and designed to be taken prior to Transform Maryland: Theories into Practice (HNUH219P), wherein students undertake a real-world consulting engagement for their client--the University of Maryland--to improve its business processes.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH 219T is the first course in the "Transform Maryland" Theory/Practice track, followed by HNUH 219P.'
HNUH228A
Peace in our time? Conflict and Conflict Resolution in International Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Is the world getting more peaceful? There are currently civil wars raging in much of the world and millions of people have fled these wars as refugees or internally displaced persons. Terrorist attacks kill thousands, and can occur in any corner of the planet. At the same time many actors use strategies such as peacekeeping, mediation, promotion of human rights and post-conflict justice to resolve conflicts and build peace. In this course, we will examine conflict, peace, and conflict resolution in contemporary international politics. We will interrogate concepts such as peace, conflict, and violence, the different forms that these phenomena can take, and how we can measure their occurrence. We will discuss theoretical explanations for why individuals and groups have disputes and why these actors choose to use violence (or not) in these disputes and examine these arguments in specific cases. We will analyze conflict resolution strategies such as mediation, peacekeeping, and human rights promotion both theoretically and empirically. This discussion will allow students to develop an argument for whether the world is getting more peaceful, why it is or is not, and what this could mean about the future of violence and peace.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the 'War & Peace' cluster; War & Peace courses will be offered through Spring 2022.
HNUH228Y
Interrogating Issues of Piracy/Pirates amidst the Shadowy Landscapes of War & Peace
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Who are pirates and what constitutes piracy in a given era? To what extent do changing notions of piracy reflect major societal transformations at the national, regional and global levels, as well as reveal the contested and often overlapping boundaries of war and peace? How can we use pirates/piracy as a "tool" to engender an historical, economic, political, social, and cultural understanding of global forces and change? Do the legends and myths surrounding infamous pirates represent the realities and relationships of early and new forms of piracy? Could piracy be conceived as a form of counterculture? To what extent do piracy, rivalry, state building, war-making, peace-making all belong on the same continuum? This course examines pirates/piracy as an integral part of major global processes. We will investigate when and why piracy emerged and flourished, and how lawbreakers and lawmakers relate to one another on the murky terrains of power, then explore alternative ways to (re)configure who is a pirate and what constitutes piracy, especially within the dynamics of today's neo-liberal globalization.
Restricted to UH students who matriculated in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the 'War & Peace' cluster; War & Peace courses will be offered through Spring 2022.
HNUH238Y
Information Weaponization: Thinking Critically in a Changing World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS
Contemporary challenges--such as climate change, food, energy and water security, and deadly virus transmission--demand that people think critically. These challenges are often complex and interrelated; for example, society's increasing demand for energy contributes to human-induced climate change, which in turn, limits freshwater and food supplies, and which in turn, could contribute to the worldwide spread of disease. While many societal challenges are seriously impacting local, regional and global communities, an increasing availability of information has contributed to what many call a "Post-Truth Era," where emotions and personal beliefs override scientifically valid evidence and explanations. We will consider the institutional use of post-truth a form of information weaponization. This course asks how information weaponization impacts the evaluation of valid lines of evidence and explanations. How do we evaluate and what is needed to improve individuals' evaluations of claims in the post-truth era? Combatting mythological and unproductive thinking in the face of current change requires increased digital literacy. We will learn enhanced reasoning, evaluation skills, and critical thinking.
Restricted to UH students who matriculated in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the 'Deliberation' cluster; Deliberation courses will be offered through Spring 2022.
HNUH248A
Identity, Places, & Spaces
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Students in this interdisciplinary course will explore multi-layered issues related to privilege and oppression through their own life experiences via exposure to theory, research, film, memoirs, and current events. Students will evaluate and critique common assumptions about the meaning and experiences of privilege and oppression using Intersectionality theory as a guiding framework. The human experience related to various social identities (i.e., race, gender and gender identity, sexual orientation, social class, religion, age, and ability) will be addressed.
Restricted to UH students whomatriculated in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the 'Identity & Intersectionality' cluster; Identity & Intersectionality courses will be offered through Spring 2022.
HNUH248Y
How Do You "Man Up?": Men, Masculinity, and Mental Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
In August 2018, the American Psychological Association released guidelines regarding the best practices for researchers and mental health professionals when working with boys and men. Many reacted with the question, "are we treating masculinity as a mental health issue?" This course aims to answer that question by taking a historical perspective on how American society has viewed masculinity from the beginning of psychology as a field of study until present day. An intersectional approach will be taken to better understand how race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, and socioeconomic status impact men and masculinity. We will address the questions: How does one prove their manhood? How much of masculinity is biological versus socialized? What experiences are unique to men? And how do psychologists and mental health professionals understand and address mental health concerns among men?
Restricted to UH students who matriculated in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the 'Identity & Intersectionality' cluster; Identity & Intersectionality courses will be offered through Spring 2022.
HNUH258X
Carnal Knowledge: Health, Data, and Power from Enlightenment to WebMD
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
"Carnal knowledge" may sound provocative but, in a literal sense, it describes information derived from and about the human body. Consider a ship captain observing the tattoos of sailors to understand their origins, a surgeon examining a cadaver for signs of saintliness, or a natural philosopher ingesting an herb to determine its toxicity. These are instances of carnal knowledge. Historically, such intimate acts turned the body into a site of data collection and a powerful source of information. Both by choice and by force, the instrumentalization of the human body was used to solve scientific problems as well as to justify hierarchies of race and sex. Through a deep engagement with this material, students will connect topics such as the transatlantic slave trade to cell lines as they uncover the embodied relationship between information and power that still shapes our world today.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the "Information & Power" thematic cluster. Information & Power courses will be offered through Spring 2023.
HNUH268X
Sex for Sale: Prostitution in Transnational Perspective
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS
Can sex be sold? Is prostitution work or violence, and who gets to decide if it is legal or illegal? The sex industry has provoked considerable debate in academia, policy circles, and aid organizations globally. This interdisciplinary seminar will engage with these debates through an exploration of histories of prostitution across time and space and in a variety of theoretical and material contexts. While our main focus will be on nineteenth- and twentieth-century United States, Europe, and the Middle East, we will also explore cases from South and East Asia and Latin America. We will use this transnational lens to interrogate social and cultural assumptions about bodies, agency, and social institutions. We will also consider a variety of social movements (from anti-prostitution to SlutWalks) and regulatory policies, from criminalization to legalization. Through readings, research, and reflection, this course invites students to move beyond stereotypes and develop their own approach to these body politics.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the "Body Politics" thematic cluster. Body Politics courses will be offered through Spring 2023.
HNUH268Y
The Politics of Disability: Life Narratives & Identity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS
Credit only granted for: HONR218V or HNUH268Y.
Formerly: HONR218V.
The politics of disability are fraught and contentious. This course takes up the experience of disability by asking how and why differently-abled bodies are excluded, marginalized, or threatened. Students will examine these questions through the psychosocial and cultural history of disability, as well as through life narratives and real-world exploration. Beginning with the history of disability, students will gain an understanding of how current disability identity and culture has develop in the US. Students will experience and also produce personal life narratives related to bodily politics and gain insights that help them navigate the politics and participate in the change-making advocacy of disability.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the "Body Politics" thematic cluster. Body Politics courses will be offered through Spring 2023.
HONR
HONR238R
HONR249D
Honors Seminar; How Can We Study Environmental Problems?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS
HONR269T
Honors Seminar: Understanding U.S. Foreign Policy toward Afghanistan
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
This is a Global Classroom course. There will be approximately 3 to 4 classes where this course will meet on a Saturday or Sunday morning for videoconferencing with students in Kabul, Afghanistan instead of meeting at its normal weekly time on Thursday nights (exact dates and times are TBA).
HONR278G
Honors Seminar; Exploring How Foreign Policy Is Developed
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS
IMMR
Immigration Studies
IMMR219C
Immigration Policy, Immigrant Lives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: ANTH264.
Credit only granted for: ANTH264 or IMMR219C.
An examination of the phenomenon of international migration, or immigration. Students develop awareness of how immigration has been framed in the general public and examined by social science disciplines, most prominently anthropology. Examination of case studies of different immigrant groups in distinct geographic contexts will illuminate the varied incorporation experiences of immigrants into U.S. society.
INST
Information Studies
INST154
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Examines Apollo mission, one of the greatest engineering accomplishments of all time, in which Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. Since the mission, people have asked: if we can land on the moon, why can't we eliminate poverty? Why can't we cure cancer? Why can't we prevent global warming? Asks what were the social, political, financial, scientific, engineering, operational, and human aspects of the Apollo program that came together to make the moon landings possible?
INST155
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: INFM289I or INST155.
Formerly: INFM289I.
Introduces methods for analyzing and understanding how people use social media - social networking websites, blogging and microblogging, and other forms of online interaction and content generation - and their societal implications. Introduces students to the science and social science of network analysis. Through real world examples, including analysis of their own social networks, students develop skills for describing and understanding the patterns and usage of services like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and others.
INST201
Introduction to Information Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Credit only granted for: INST201 or INST301.
Formerly: INST301.
Examining the effects of new information technologies on how we conduct business, interact with friends, and go through our daily lives. Understanding how technical and social factors have influenced the evolution of information society. Evaluating the transformative power of information in education, policy, and entertainment, and the dark side of these changes.
INST301
Introduction to Information Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Restriction: Must be in Information Science program; and restricted to students in the Information Science Program on the Universities at Shady Grove campus.
Credit only granted for: INST201 or INST301.
Examining the effects of new information technologies on how we conduct business, interact with friends, and go through our daily lives. Understanding how technical and social factors have influenced the evolution of information society. Evaluating the transformative power of information in education, policy, and entertainment, and the dark side of these changes.
ISRL
Israel Studies
ISRL289I
The Israeli/Palestinian Conflict: Fundamental Questions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
As has become evident this year, the Palestinian-Israeli conflict retains its capacity to mobilize both sides against each other. Why are Palestinian Arabs and Israeli Jews unable to resolve their differences? This course uncovers some of the deeper explanations as to why the conflict persists, even as it changes over the decades.
ISRL342
History of Modern Israel
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Cross-listed with HIST376.
Credit only granted for: HIST376 or ISRL342.
History of modern Israel since the beginning of the Zionist settlement in 1882. Attention to different interpretations and narratives of Israel's history, including the historical and ideological roots of Zionism, the establishment of the State of Israel, ideological forces, wars, and the triumphs and crises of democracy.
ISRL343
Global Migration and the Israeli Case Study
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: SOCY398G.
Credit only granted for: ISRL349K, GVPT368G, SOCY398G, SOCY398I, or ISRL343.
Formerly: ISRL349K.
Over 70% of Israel's population is made of first, second or third generation immigrants, who came from over 70 countries, making Israel an ultimate immigrant society. This course will focus on the history of Israel as a case study for the understanding of the historical phenomena of modern immigration.
JOUR
Journalism Department Site
JOUR150
Introduction to Mass Communication
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP
Additional information: Not applicable toward journalism major.
Survey of the functions and effects of the mass media in the United States. A consumer's introduction to newspapers, television, radio, film, sound recording, books, magazines, and new media technology.
JOUR281
Media Law and Ethics in the Digital Age
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR289E or JOUR281.
Formerly: JOUR289E.
Additional information: This course is intended for non-journalism majors.
Explores the First Amendment, libel, privacy, FOIA and copyright as they have evolved in the digital news age of bloggers, tweeters and citizen journalists. The course will cover fundamental legal and ethical concepts as well as practical application.
JOUR284
Scandal: Exposing Corruption, Justice, and Vice in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR289P, JOUR284 or HONR239J.
Formerly: JOUR289P, HONR239J.
Students will examine the nature and meaning of scandals in society: how they are uncovered and constructed; why some forms of wrongdoing are considered scandalous but not others; how this definition has changed over time; and how scandals resonate in ways that reflect societal norms.
JWST
Jewish Studies Department Site
JWST141
American Jewish Experience
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with HIST106.
Credit only granted for: HIST106 or JWST141.
History of the Jews in America from Colonial times to the present. Emphasis on the waves of migration from Germany and Eastern Europe; the changing nature of the American Jewish community and its participation in American social, economic, and political life.
JWST187
God, Land, Power, and the People: Moral Issues in the Jewish Historical Experience
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HIST187.
Credit only granted for: HIST187 or JWST187.
Examines the complicated relationship between theology, nationalism, sovereignty, and the ethical exercise of social control using case studies drawn from the Jewish historical experience. The universal and age-old issues implicit in the exercise of power have gained special moral force for Jews with the creation of the State of Israel, a Jewish and a democratic state with substantial non-Jewish minorities and hundreds of thousands of non-citizen subjects. Can these be reconciled? Jewish efforts over the ages and in recent times to define justice provide concrete examples through which to examine and discuss crucial abstract principles.
JWST289E
Civil Discourse or Urban Riot: Why Cities Don't (Often) Explode
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HIST135.
Credit only granted for: HIST135 or JWST289E.
An examination of the mechanisms that promote peaceful co-existence in urban societies and a discussion of how and why city streets sometimes become violent.
JWST319Y
Archaeological Methods and Practice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS
Prerequisite: ANTH240, ARTH200, or CLAS180.
Cross-listed with: ANTH305, ARTH305, CLAS305.
Credit only granted for: ANTH305, ARTH305, CLAS305, or JWST319Y.
A team-taught, interdisciplinary course discussing theories, methods, and ethical issues in the practice of archaeology.
JWST370
Before the Holocaust: The Golden Age of Eastern European Jewry
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: HIST419Q.
Credit only granted for: JWST419E, JWST370, or HIST419Q.
Formerly: JWST419E.
An exploration of the history of the Jews of Eastern Europe from the period of the Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth until the Holocaust. Topics to be covered include religious, political, social, and cultural transformation of Jewish life in Eastern Europe in the context of the general political changes in the area.
Jointly offered with HIST419Q. Credit granted for JWST370 or HIST419Q.
KNES
Kinesiology Department Site
KNES225
Hoop Dreams: Black Masculinity and Sport
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: KNES289R OR KNES225.
Formerly: KNES289R.
Has sport disadvantaged African American males? This course critically examines sport as a site where notions of black masculinity are publicly debated, critiqued, challenged, celebrated, and also transformed. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores how sport has been invoked across the political and ideological spectrum to interrogate a number of issues impacting the life chances of young, African Americans males including educational attainment, poverty, social mobility, racism, cultural production, and notions of masculinity.
KNES287
Sport and American Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Recommended: Minimum grade of C- in KNES285.
Sport will be related to such social problems as delinquency, segregation, collective behavior, and leisure; to social processes such as socialization, stratification, mobility, and social control; and to those familiar social institutions the family, the school, the church, the military, the economy, the polity, and the mass media.
Restricted to majors or non-majors with less than or equal to 45 credits.
KNES350
The Psychology of Sports & Exercise
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
An exploration of personality factors, including but not limited to motivation, aggression and emotion, as they affect sports participation and motor skill performance.
Restricted to students with a minimum of 45 credit or greater.
KNES350H
(Perm Req)
The Psychology of Sports & Exercise
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
An exploration of personality factors, including but not limited to motivation, aggression and emotion, as they affect sports participation and motor skill performance.
This section is restricted to students who have been admitted in the Kinesiology Honors program.
LASC
Certificate in Latin American Studies
LASC234
Issues in Latin American Studies I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with SPAN234, PORT234.
Credit only granted for: LASC234, PORT234, or SPAN234.
Interdisciplinary study of major issues in Latin America and the Caribbean, including Latin America's cultural mosaic, migration and urbanization. Democratization and the role of religions. Taught in English.
LASC234H
Issues in Latin American Studies I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with SPAN234, PORT234.
Credit only granted for: LASC234, PORT234, or SPAN234.
Interdisciplinary study of major issues in Latin America and the Caribbean, including Latin America's cultural mosaic, migration and urbanization. Democratization and the role of religions. Taught in English.
LASC250
History of Colonial Latin America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with HIST250.
Credit only granted for: LASC250 or HIST250.
Introductory survey of the history of Latin America from pre-Columbian Indian cultures to the beginning of the wars for independence (ca. 1810), covering cultural, political, social, and economic developments. Major themes include conquest, colonialism, indigenous culture, African slavery, religion, race and ethnicity, and gender ideologies.
LGBT
Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Studies
LGBT200
Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: LGBT200.
An interdisciplinary study of the historical and social contexts of personal, cultural and political aspects of LGBT life. Sources from a variety of fields, such as anthropology, history, psychology, sociology, and women's studies, focusing on writings by and about LGBT people.