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Courses - Fall 2021
ANSC
Animal Science
ANSC227
Eating with Eyes Wide Open
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Students will investigate the tension that is created by trade-offs that, knowingly or not, are made by consumers relative to agricultural production methods and dietary choices. Course will inform students about their food supply so they can make informed decisions and practice intentional or informed eating.
AOSC
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science
AOSC123
Causes and Implications of Global Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Cross-listed with GEOL123.
Credit only granted for: AOSC123, GEOG123, GEOL123, or METO123.
Formerly: METO123.
Responsible policy and decision making on issues related to the global environment requires understanding of the basic scientific issues, relationships between the geophysical and biological sciences, the impacts on regional and global endeavors, and the political manner in which humans respond. This course embodies an integrated introduction to the broad scientific and social aspects of the global change problem.
AOSC200
Weather and Climate
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with AOSC201) or DSNS, SCIS
Prerequisite: MATH107, MATH110, or MATH115.
Recommended: Concurrent enrollment in AOSC201.
Formerly: METO200.
Broad survey of the state of knowledge and problems of atmospheric science. Origin and structure of the atmosphere, meteorological observations, weather maps, forecasting, satellites, energetics, wind, general circulation, storms, severe weather, climate change, air pollution.
AOSC200C
Weather and Climate
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with AOSC201) or DSNS, SCIS
Prerequisite: MATH107, MATH110, or MATH115.
Recommended: Concurrent enrollment in AOSC201.
Formerly: METO200.
Broad survey of the state of knowledge and problems of atmospheric science. Origin and structure of the atmosphere, meteorological observations, weather maps, forecasting, satellites, energetics, wind, general circulation, storms, severe weather, climate change, air pollution.
AREC
Agricultural and Resource Economics Department Site
AREC200
The Chesapeake Bay Ecosystem: Intersection of Science, Economics, and Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS or DSSP, SCIS
The Chesapeake Bay is one of the most studied and monitored ecosystems in the world. To develop effective policies to restore this system to a healthier status requires integrating what we know about the biological and physical properties of the system with our understanding of the human dimension. Issues such as achieving nutrient reduction goals, restoring healthy blue crab and oyster fisheries in the bay will be used to demonstrate how economics interacts with science to guide policies that can be effective in achieving Bay restoration goals.
ASTR
Astronomy Department Site
ASTR100
Introduction to Astronomy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Credit only granted for: ASTR100, ASTR101, or ASTR120.
An elementary course in descriptive astronomy, especially appropriate for non-science students. Topics include the Sun, Moon, planets, stars, and nebulae, galaxies, and evolution of the Universe.
ASTR120
Introductory Astrophysics - Solar System
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: Must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in MATH140.
Restriction: Must not have completed ASTR101 or ASTR100.
Credit only granted for: ASTR100, ASTR101, or ASTR120.
For students majoring in astronomy or with a strong interest in science. Topics include development of astronomy, planetary orbits, electromagnetic radiation, telescopes as well as constituents and origin of the solar system (planets, satellites, comets, asteroids, meteoroids, etc.).
ASTR220
Collisions in Space - The Threat of Asteroid Impacts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in Astronomy program.
Additional information: Course is open to Astronomy and Planetary Sciences minors.
Appropriate for non-science majors. Worried? Can't sleep? Collisions in Space will evaluate the threat of asteroid impacts with the Earth using knowledge of asteroid characteristics and orbits. The merits of possible defense plans will be discussed, as well as the budgetary and political concerns associated with implementing any such plan.
ASTR230
The Science and Fiction of Planetary Systems
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Prerequisite: Must have math eligibility of MATH115 or higher; or MATH113.
Have you ever wondered if humans will ever terraform Mars or Europa so we could live there without a spacesuit? Has it ever crossed your mind how lucky you are that you live on a water-rich planet with an oxygen-rich atmosphere? Have you ever suspected novelists and scriptwriters of creating ridiculous planets that violate scientific laws? Does the fate of our planet's thin biosphere keep you up at night? How common is life in the Universe? These are difficult questions, but armed with the right information, you can answer all of them. The Science and Fiction of Planetary Systems will help you develop a deeper understanding of why planets are the way they are. Along the way, you'll see examples of mistakes made in classic science fiction movies, novels and short stories and get the chance to invent your own plausible planets!
ASTR330
Solar System Astronomy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: ASTR100 or ASTR101; and completion of the CORE Distributive Studies requirement in Mathematics and Sciences or the General Education Fundamental Studies requirement in Mathematics. Or permission of CMNS-Astronomy department.
Credit only granted for: ASTR330 or GEOL212.
Designed primarily for non-science majors. The structure of planets and of their atmospheres, the nature of comets, asteroids, and satellites. Comparison of various theories for the origin of the solar system. Emphasis on a description of recent data and interpretation.
ASTR340
Origin of the Universe
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: ASTR100 or ASTR101; and completion of the CORE Distributive Studies requirement in Mathematics and Sciences or General Education Fundamental Studies requirement in Mathematics. Or permission of CMNS-Astronomy department.
Designed primarily for non-science majors. A study of our progression of knowledge about the universe. Topics include: early cosmological models, geocentric vs. heliocentric theory, curvature of space, Hubble's Law, Big Bang Theory, microwave background radiation, evolution of stars and galaxies, dark matter, active galaxies, quasars and the future of the universe.
ASTR380
Life in the Universe - Astrobiology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Designed primarily for non-science majors. Study of the astronomical perspective on the conditions for the origin and existence of life in the universe.
BSCI
Biological Sciences Program Department Site
BSCI126
Pollinators in Crisis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
We will dissect the pollinator crisis, and in the process learn about insects, about the interaction of organisms in complex ecosystems, and about the human-nature interface. Students will work in groups that specialize in an aspect of pollinator biology and their challenges. Instruction will target methods for collecting information, interpretation of scientific information and the professional presentation of findings.
(Sponsoring Dept.: ENTM). Not acceptable for credit for any Biological Sciences major.
BSCI160
Principles of Ecology and Evolution
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with BSCI161) or DSNS
Prerequisite: Must have math eligibility of MATH120 or higher.
Recommended: For Science majors.
Credit only granted for: BSCI106 or BSCI160.
Formerly: BSCI106.
Basic principles of biology with special emphasis on ecological and evolutionary biology.
(Sponsoring Dept.: BSCI).
BSCI170
Principles of Molecular & Cellular Biology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with BSCI171) or DSNS
Prerequisite: Must have math eligibility of MATH120 or higher.
Recommended: For Science majors.
Credit only granted for: BSCI105 or BSCI170.
Formerly: BSCI105.
Basic principles of biology with special emphasis on cellular and molecular biology.
(Sponsoring Dept.: BSCI).
BSST
Terrorism Studies
BSST240
Understanding The Principles and Perils of CBRN Weapons
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with BSST241) or DSNS
Additional information: If taken in the same term as BSST241 these courses will count for General Education Natural Sciences Lab.
Explores the 'dark side' of scientific applications. Students will gain an understanding of CBRN Weapons, through the exploration of the scientific method, and certain fundamental principles of chemistry, biology, and physics. Students will also learn how to test hypotheses, use basic statistics, interpret results, and apply their new knowledge through discussions of practical applications in the domains of public health, emergency management, epidemiology, and threat assessment. Bringing these fields together in one class will allow students to better understand the use of and threat from CBRN weapons in terrorism.
CHEM
Chemistry Department Site
The College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences enforces course prerequisites. Students who do not meet the course prerequisites will be administratively dropped from the course.

Registration in course sections which begin with "SEF*" are restricted to students admitted into the Science in the Evening Program, administer ed through the Office of Extended Studies. For complete information, visit: OES website, email:oes@umd.edu, or call 301-405-7762.

CHEM131
Chemistry I - Fundamentals of General Chemistry
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with CHEM132) or DSNS
Prerequisite: Must have math eligibility of MATH120 or higher.
Corequisite: CHEM132.
Recommended: For Science majors.
Credit only granted for: CHEM103, CHEM131, CHEM135, CHEM153 or CHEM146.
Formerly: CHEM103.
An overview of the Periodic Table, inorganic substances, ionic and covalent bonding, bulk properties of materials, chemical equilibrium, and quantitative chemistry. CHEM131 is the first course in a four-semester sequence for students majoring in the sciences, other than Chemistry and Biochemistry majors.
Students without the math pre-requisite will be administratively dropped.
CHEM131S
Chemistry I - Fundamentals of General Chemistry
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with CHEM132) or DSNS
Prerequisite: Must have math eligibility of MATH120 or higher.
Corequisite: CHEM132.
Recommended: For Science majors.
Credit only granted for: CHEM103, CHEM131, CHEM135, CHEM153 or CHEM146.
Formerly: CHEM103.
An overview of the Periodic Table, inorganic substances, ionic and covalent bonding, bulk properties of materials, chemical equilibrium, and quantitative chemistry. CHEM131 is the first course in a four-semester sequence for students majoring in the sciences, other than Chemistry and Biochemistry majors.
Restricted to College Park Scholars - Life Sciences. Students without the math pre-requisite will be administratively dropped.
ENMA
Engineering, Materials Department Site
ENMA150
Materials of Civilization
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
The discovery of new materials has shaped history and built civilizations. The utilization, properties and production techniques of materials from the Bronze Age up through modern times and into the future will be traced. These materials are explained by considering their atomic structure, the binding forces between atoms and their arrangement, and how controlling the structure controls the materials properties.
ENSP
Environmental Science and Policy Department Site
ENSP101
Introduction to Environmental Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS
One of two required courses that introduce students to the topics studied and methods employed in environmental science and policy. Emphasis on scientific ways of knowing; the systems, cycles, flows, and interfaces that characterize the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere; the analysis of human impacts on these systems; and the nature of scientific uncertainty and methods of quantifying environmental processes.
ENST
Environmental Science and Technology Department Site
ENST233
Introduction to Environmental Health
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Examines how humans are affected by the quality of our air, water, soil and food supply as well as how human activities alter these survival necessities. Students will learn how the evolution and prosperity of human populations have resulted in degradation of our environment and the impact of environmental degradation on the health of people. The implications of individual and collective choices for sustainable food production, population management, and resource utilization will be explored.
GEOG
Geographical Sciences Department Site
GEOG140
Natural Disasters: Earthquakes, Floods, and Fires
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Catastrophic Environmental Events (CCE) that are becoming more common in this time of global environmental change and it is essential that today's students be equipped with the knowledge and skills to be leaders as we, as a society, understand the upheaval that these CCEs are causing. Students will examine how CEEs shape human society and ecosystem from the interdisciplinary perspective afforded by the field of Geography. Students will use the latest geographic science concepts and techniques in exploring these events. Using satellite imagery they will gain a multi-scale perspective of the ecological and societal aspects of the events.
GEOG170
Mapping our Digital World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Introduction to technical methods used in gathering, analyzing, and mapping geospatial information for applications such as urban mobility, environmental monitoring, situational awareness, and disaster management. Topics include Geographic Information Systems (GIS), cartography, map projections, satellite and airborne remote sensing, the global positioning system (GPS), and introductory statistics and probability. The course is a gateway to more advanced technical classes in geospatial science.
GEOL
Geology Department Site
GEOL100
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with GEOL110) or DSNS
Credit only granted for: GEOL100 or GEOL120.
Additional information: CORE Distributive Studies Physical Science Laboratory Course only when taken concurrently with GEOL 110.
A general survey of the rocks and minerals composing the earth, its surface features and the agents that form them, and the dynamic forces of plate tectonics.
GEOL104
Dinosaurs: A Natural History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Dinosaurs, their evolution, and our understanding of their fossil record. Students will examine the geologic record and the tools used by paleontologists to determine: geologic ages and ancient environments; evolutionary history and extinctions; dinosaurian biology and behavior; and their survival as birds. Mechanisms of global change ranging from plate tectonics to asteroid impact will be discussed.
GEOL120
Environmental Geology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with GEOL110) or DSNS
Credit only granted for: GEOL100 or GEOL120.
A review of geologic factors underlying many environmental problems and the interactions between population and physical environment: geologic hazards, land-use planning, conservation, mineral resources, waste disposal, land reclamation, and the geologic aspects of health and disease. The course is aimed at lower division students in education and liberal arts, and should be useful to any student concerned with geologic perspectives of environmental problems.
GEOL123
Causes and Consequences of Global Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Cross-listed with AOSC123.
Credit only granted for: AOSC123, GEOG123, GEOL123, or METO123.
Study of the major components of Earth's climate system and climate change history. Discussion of 21st century climate change prediction, mitigation and adaptation efforts.
GEOL124
Evolution of Life and Environment on Planet Earth
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
An exploration of how life has shaped Earth's physical environments, both in the contemporary Earth and over the long course of Earth history. Topics range from evidence for the origin and diversification of life and its impact on Earth environments to the mind-set and methods of the scientists who interpret it, and what those methods tell us about future interactions between life and the environment, both on Earth and in the Solar System.
Restricted to students in Carillon Communities.
GEOL200
Earth's Fury: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Tsunami
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunami frequently remind us of the dangers associated with living on a constantly changing planet. How do people prepare for these rare but dramatic events? Student will study the science behind earthquakes and volcanoes, how it guides monitoring, forecasting, prevention, and response, and the cultural and ethical aspects of these events.
GEOL212
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Credit only granted for: ASTR330 or GEOL212.
An examination of the geologic and geochemical processes at work in the solar system from the perspectives supplied by space age exploration of the planets and other solar system bodies.
HNUH
University Honors
HNUH218Y
The Science, Economics, and Governance of Climate Change: The Need For An Energy Revolution
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS
Hardly a day goes by without some news worthy item being reported on Earth's changing climate. Often the stories are contradictory, tainted by parochialism and extremism, not only by the conservative and liberal media, but also by the camps of so-called believers and deniers. This seminar will begin with a review of the history of how decisions regarding human interactions with the environment have either doomed past societies to failure, or enabled long-term, sustainable success. Next we'll examine the science that underlies global warming, in a manner accessible to non-scientists, as well as the potential consequences of a rapidly changing climate. We will then discuss the economics of large-scale provision of energy by renewable resources, which will be needed to avert climate catastrophe. During the final few weeks of this seminar, students will break into three groups, representing various parts of the world, and negotiate an international plan to transition the world energy supply to renewable resources that emit little or no greenhouse gases.
Restricted to UH students who matriculated in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the Revolution thematic cluster and must be paired with HNUH218A to complete the cluster. Please be aware that HNUH218A will only be offered in Fall 2021 and Winter Term (asynchronous, online) January 2022. If you have not yet taken HNUH218A, you should either register for both this course and HNUH218A together in Fall 2021, or plan to take HNUH218A in the winter term.
HONR
HONR268N
Honors Seminar; Cracking the Secrets of the Universe Using Computers: Re-discovering the Higgs and Searching for Invisible Matter
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
KNES
Kinesiology Department Site
KNES226
The Cybernetic Human
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: KNES289W OR KNES226.
Formerly: KNES289W.
Can the profound and rapid technological advances experienced in the 21st century change what it means to be human or the nature of humanity? Emergent technologies, new materials, increased computer power, engineering innovations, and groundbreaking work in the sciences of cognition and action provide myriad opportunities for repairing and enhancing the human body and brain. Examines the ethical, social, and technological implications of an increasing synergism of technology and the body in sports and the arts, at work or home, rehabilitating the body and the brain, and society at large.
KNES260
Science of Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSNS
Course details (1) the public health importance of and the processes underlying cardiovascular disease, (2) the risk factors for cardiovascular disease and the methods whereby they were identified, and (3) the principles of the scientific evidence supporting the use of physical activity to prevent cardiovascular disease.
NEUR
Neuroscience
NEUR200
Introduction to Neuroscience
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in BSCI170 and BSCI171.
Cross-listed with: PSYC202.
Credit only granted for: PSYC309U, NEUR200, PSYC202 or PSYC301.
Formerly: PSYC309U.
In an evolutionary sense, the job of the nervous system is to produce, control, and coordinate behaviors that help an animal survive and reproduce. Neuroscience is the study of how the nervous system does that. Provides a broad introduction to neuroscience, always keeping the behavioral consequences in view.
NFSC
Nutrition and Food Science Department Site
The following courses may involve the use of animals. Students who are concerned about the use of animals in teaching have the responsibility to contact the instructor, prior to course enrollment, to determine whether animals are to be used in the course, whether class exercises involving animals are optional or required and what alternatives, if any, are available.
NFSC100
Elements of Nutrition
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Fundamentals of human nutrition. Nutrient requirements related to changing individual and family needs.
NFSC100H
Elements of Nutrition
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Fundamentals of human nutrition. Nutrient requirements related to changing individual and family needs.
For general honors students only.
NFSC112
Food: Science and Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Introduction to the realm of food science, food technology and food processing. An overview of the largest industry in the U.S. with emphasis on the science of food and the technology of food preservation from harvest through processing and packaging to distribution and consumer utilization.
PHYS
Physics Department Site
PHYS161
General Physics: Mechanics and Particle Dynamics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: Must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in MATH141.
Credit only granted for: PHYS141, PHYS161, or PHYS171.
First semester of a three-semester calculus-based general physics course. Laws of motion, force, and energy; principles of mechanics, collisions, linear momentum, rotation, and gravitation.
Physics clinic, PHY 1214, MTWHF 11, 2. If purchasing used books additional software may be required.
PHYS171
Introductory Physics: Mechanics and Relativity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: (MATH140; and a high school physics course); or permission of CMNS-Physics department. And must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in MATH141.
Credit only granted for: PHYS141, PHYS161, or PHYS171.
First semester of a three semester sequence for physics majors and those desiring a rigorous preparation in the physical sciences: kinematics, Newton's laws, energy and work, linear and angular momenta, temperature and pressure, ideal gas law, and special relativity.
In person lecture meetings will occur every other week. Students who can only enroll if the course is fully online will be accommodated, and should contact the instructor.

Jointly offered with PHYS171H.
PHYS171H
(Perm Req)
Introductory Physics: Mechanics and Relativity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: (MATH140; and a high school physics course); or permission of CMNS-Physics department. And must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in MATH141.
Credit only granted for: PHYS141, PHYS161, or PHYS171.
First semester of a three semester sequence for physics majors and those desiring a rigorous preparation in the physical sciences: kinematics, Newton's laws, energy and work, linear and angular momenta, temperature and pressure, ideal gas law, and special relativity.
In person lecture meetings will occur every other week. Students who can only enroll if the course is fully online will be accommodated, and should contact the instructor.

Jointly offered with PHYS171.
PHYS199M
The Manhattan Project
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSNS, SCIS
Additional information: This course has no prerequisites. However, the course will use mathematics extensively at the level up to and including standard high school algebra II. Students will need to be comfortable applying mathematics at this level.
Introduction to some critical ideas of nuclear physics and a review of some key historical developments starting at the end of the 19th century. Chronological development of nuclear physics from the discovery of radioactivity by Becquerel in 1896 through to the discovery of fission in Germany in 1938 followed by an examination of the programs to develop nuclear weapons in the United States, Britain and Germany. Extensive study of political, ethical, scientific, military, social, and economic issues surrounding the Manhattan Project.
PLSC
Plant Sciences
PLSC112
Introductory Crop Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with PLSC113) or DSNS
Credit only granted for: PLSC101 or PLSC112 and PLSC113.
Formerly: PLSC101.
Major crop plants including: anatomy, physiology, morphology, history, use, adaptation, culture, improvement and economic importance.
PLSC115
How Safe is Your Salad? The Microbiological Safety of Fresh produce
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Recommended: PLSC110 and PLSC111; or (PLSC112 and PLSC113); or BSCI105; or (BSCI170 and BSCI171).
As food is produced in larger quantities and made to travel longer distances, keeping our food safe in this day and age is an ever growing challenge. This course will focus on the question of what it takes to grow and maintain safe fruits and vegetables, as food travels along the path from the farm to your fork. Food safety of fresh produce will be discussed from the public health, agricultural, economical and policy perspectives.
PLSC125
Feeding Ten Billion by 2050: Food Security and Crop Protection
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
A big question concerning global food security is "how can we feed 10 billion people in 2050?" This course will stimulate creative thinking about possible solutions particularly from the crop production perspective. The instructors will introduce the concept of food security and different dimensions of this complex issue, identify major constraints to food security, and discuss scientific approaches that may be used to meet the grand challenge. Emphasis will be placed on topical and controversial issues such as the impact of climate change, biofuel production and GM crops on food security, and novel strategies that can improve food security.
PLSC203
Plants, Genes and Biotechnology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: BSCI103 or BSCI105; or (BSCI170 and BSCI171).
An overview of the history, genetics, and reproductive mechanisms for agronomic and horticultural plants that examines mechanisms of genetic improvement ranging from traditional plant breeding to tissue culture and genetic engineering. Social and political issues such as germplasm preservation and international intellectual property rights will also be discussed.
PSYC
Psychology Department Site
The following courses may involve the use of animals. Students who are concerned about the use of animals in teaching have the responsibility to contact the instructor, prior to course enrollment, to determine whether animals are to be used in the course, whether class exercises involving animals are optional or required and what alternatives, if any, are available.
The Department of Psychology enforces course prerequisites. Students who do not meet the course prerequisites will be administratively dropped from the course.
PSYC100
Introduction to Psychology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSNS
A basic introductory course intended to bring the student into contact with the major problems confronting psychology and the more important attempts at their solution.
Discussion sections do not meet until after first lecture. Research requirement: may involve participation in research.
PSYC202
Introduction to Neuroscience
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in BSCI170 and BSCI171.
Cross-listed with: NEUR200.
Credit only granted for: PSYC309U, NEUR200, PSYC202 or PSYC301.
Formerly: PSYC309U.
In an evolutionary sense, the job of the nervous system is to produce, control, and coordinate behaviors that help an animal survive and reproduce. Neuroscience is the study of how the nervous system does that. Provides a broad introduction to neuroscience, always keeping the behavioral consequences in view.
PSYC304
Biological Psychology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: PSYC100, BSCI170 and BSCI171; or equivalent.
Credit only granted for: PSYC301 or PSYC304.
Formerly: PSYC301.
Biological Psychology is the study of the physiological basis of behavior. In this course, we will first cover the basic principles of brain organization and neural transmission. We will then introduce traditional and modern research techniques in the field of behavioral neuroscience. The last portion of the course focuses on specific topics including psychopharmacology, learning and memory, emotion, stress, drug of abuse, neurological disorders (e.g., Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease) and schizophrenia.
Restricted to PSYC majors.
SPHL
Public Health Department Site
SPHL291
Does Science Support Nontraditional Healing Practices?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Recommended: Successful completion of English composition course.
Does yoga improve the health of wounded warriors and/or breast cancer survivors? Can mindfulness enhance your business success and family relationships, or is it social media hype? Do you know what reflexology is, and does it help reduce your personal stress level? Increasing numbers of people are using nutritional supplements, meditation, yoga and other forms of exercise, acupuncture and experiences in nature to reduce stress levels and improve overall health and well-being. In the media, scientists to celebrities have alternately endorsed or rejected claims about how these and other nontraditional health practices benefit health and well-being. Students will sample some of these nontraditional health practices and explore whether these practices can enhance their own well-being. General scientific methods for health research will be introduced and students will use this knowledge to evaluate the existing scientific research on these practices. Students will also evaluate whether popular and media translation of scientific research on these practices is fact-based.