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Courses - Fall 2021
AAST
Asian American Studies Department Site
AAST351
Asian Americans and Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Credit only granted for: AAST351, AAST398M or AAST398N.
Formerly: AAST398M, AAST398N.
From yellow peril invaders to model minority allies, Asian Americans have crafted their own dynamic cultural expressions in a number of media from film, television, and music to fashion, sports, and food that reveal and contest the contradictions of the U.S. nation-state. Asian American culture also uniquely sits at the nexus of immigration flows and digital technologies, providing a transnational lens to view the US place in the world. This advanced course, then, will introduce students to the study and practice of Asian American cyktyre as multiple , hybrid, and heterogeneous. It will do so through three sections: section one will introduce students to classical, cultural, and media concepts as well as relevant keywords outlined by Asian American Studies scholars; section two will review the work of Asian American cultural theorists; section three will focus on analyses of particular Asian American cultural productions. In doing so, students will gain an understanding of the shifting and interlocking tensions among the local, the national, and the global that form the cultural geographies of Asian America.
AMST
American Studies Department Site
AMST328X
Perspectives on Identity and Culture; (Dis)ability in American Film
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP, DVUP
AMST450
(Perm Req)
Seminar in American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: AMST201 and AMST340; and 1 course in AMST.
Restriction: Senior standing; and must be in American Studies program.
Developments in theories and methods of American Studies scholarship, with emphasis upon interaction between the humanities and the social sciences in the process of cultural analysis and evaluation.
Developments in theories and methods of American Studies scholarship, with emphasis upon interaction between the humanities and the social sciences in the process of cultural analysis and evaluation.
ANSC
Animal Science
ANSC255
Introduction to Aquaculture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ANSC101 and ANSC103; or must have completed an introductory biology course.
Introduces the art and science of rearing aquatic animals and the essential principles of aquaculture. Students receive hands-on training in the methods required for successful husbandry and management of aquatic animals in their water environment.
Students must pay a $50.00 lab materials fee.
ANSC359
(Perm Req)
Internship Experience in Animal and Avian Sciences
Credits: 3 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ANSC220, ANSC232, ANSC242, ANSC250, ANSC255, ANSC260, or ANSC262. Restriction: Must be in a major within the AGNR-Animal & Avian Sciences department; and permission of instructor.
ANTH
Anthropology Department Site
ANTH221
Introduction to Forensic Sciences
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Credit only granted for: ANTH298A or ANTH221.
Formerly: ANTH298A.
Provides a brief history of forensic sciences, an introduction to some of the techniques used, and a demonstration of some of the applications of forensic sciences. A survey course designed to give the student some exposure to the kinds of scientific knowledge and techniques applied to the medico-legal investigation of death and other crimes.
ANTH447
Material Culture Studies in Archaeology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ANTH240.
Credit only granted for: ANTH447, ANTH448C, ANTH647, or ANTH689C.
Formerly: ANTH448C.
An in-depth introduction to the world of material culture studies with a focus on the methods and theories in historical archaeology. Students will look at archaeological data as historical documents, commodities and as symbols expressing ideas.
ANTH451
Environmental Archaeology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Credit only granted for: ANTH451, ANTH651, ANTH448F, ANTH668F.
Formerly: ANTH448F.
An overview of modern environmental archaeology as a tool for the interdisciplinary investigation of past and present global change and to engage the long term past with current issues of sustainability and rapid environmental change.
ANTH466
Anthropology of Work
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Jointly offered with: ANTH666.
Credit only granted for: ANTH466 or ANTH666.
Examines the concept and meaning of work, the different types of work, and how the development of time discipline became essential for the creation of capitalist labor. Explores the contemporary social justice movement and its impact on gender and racialized inequities. Includes an exploration of deindustrialized regions in the Rust Belt.
ARCH
Architecture Department Site
ARCH171
Design Thinking and Making in Architecture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must be a major in ARCH-Architecture Program; and must be a freshman; or have permission of the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation.
Examines iterative design processes and critical thinking skills through active learning and design thinking methodologies to solve problems and apply design as a lens of inquiry and exploration. Students will understand Design Thinking through interactive and experiential learning.
ARCH270
Design in Practice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Case studies and hands-on design projects ranging in scale from a product to a building to give students insight into the process by which architects work both individually and collaboratively to put disciplinary knowledge and expertise into practice to shape our built environment.

A Fearless Ideas Course from the Academy for Innovation & Entrepreneurship (AIE): http://ter.ps/iamFEARLESS Click here for more information on the Fearless Ideas Courses.
ARCH271
People, Planet, and Profit: Building Sustainable Places
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Cross-listed with RDEV250.
Credit only granted for: ARCH271 or RDEV250.
An introduction to the four disciplines represented in the School: architecture and urban design, community planning, historic preservation, and real estate development, that work to create a more sustainable environment for the future to create a more sustainable environment for the future using our interpretation of the quadruple bottom line: socio-cultural, economic, environmental, and design sustainability. Students will be provided with an understanding of the fundamental scholarship and processes of each of these disciplines and examine the intersections between them. Additionally, they will learn by applying the approaches of the four disciplines through a series of field studies.
ARCH386
(Perm Req)
Experiential Learning
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must have learning proposal approved by faculty sponsor and student's internship sponsor; and sophomore standing or higher; and permission of ARCH-Architecture Program.
Learning experience tied to internship of specified duration with targeted learning outcomes.
AREC
Agricultural and Resource Economics Department Site
AREC200
The Chesapeake Bay Ecosystem: Intersection of Science, Economics, and Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS or DSSP, SCIS
The Chesapeake Bay is one of the most studied and monitored ecosystems in the world. To develop effective policies to restore this system to a healthier status requires integrating what we know about the biological and physical properties of the system with our understanding of the human dimension. Issues such as achieving nutrient reduction goals, restoring healthy blue crab and oyster fisheries in the bay will be used to demonstrate how economics interacts with science to guide policies that can be effective in achieving Bay restoration goals.
AREC306
Farm Management and Sustainable Food Production
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
The organization and operation of farm businesses are explored through principles of management, financial analysis, production economics, marketing, and business planning. These farm management principles are presented in the context of a sustainable food production system.
ARHU
Arts and Humanities Department Site
ARHU158A
Explorations in Arts and Humanities; Fashion and Clothes through the Ages
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restricted to first semester first year students in the College of Arts and Humanities.

What do clothes tell us about individuals through history? This course will explore how sociological, political, economic, artistic, ethnic, geographic, technological and other factors affect costume through the ages, and how, at the same time, fashion and personal adornment emerge not only as practical necessities and/or signs of social rank and inequality, but also as manifestations of human individuality, character, personal taste and as a critically important form of communication which is unique to humans.
ARHU158U
Explorations in Arts and Humanities; How To Fix Classical Music
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restricted to first semester first year students in the College of Arts and Humanities.

A culture centered around playing music by long-dead European men. Elite trappings, sexist power dynamics, and gatekeeping that excludes people of color-- not to mention a concert scene devastated by the coronavirus pandemic. With all these problems, can classical music in the United States be fixed? This course asks students to examine, and attempt to solve, the troubles that have beset classical music today. It will also show why the genre has nevertheless endured: the deep value that musicians continue to find in compositions that are hundreds of years old, and the power that music can still carry in the twenty-first century.
ARHU158V
Explorations in Arts and Humanities; Identity in Graphic Narrative Texts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restricted to first semester first year students in the College of Arts and Humanities.

Art Spiegelman's ground-breaking, Pulitzer Prize-winning Maus ushered in a golden era for graphic novels. This course will examine representations and explorations of identity in graphic narrative texts. Drawing from the fields of literature, philosophy, politics, and gender and sexuality studies, questions we will address include: How do individuals form their identity? Can individuals form an identity free from the influences of family, religion, media, society? How do power structures affect constructions of identity? Also, what are the formal characteristics that make the graphic novel well suited for exploring identity?
ARHU158W
Explorations in Arts and Humanities; Language and Antiracism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restricted to first semester first year students in the College of Arts and Humanities.

This sociolinguistics seminar is addressed to incoming ARHU majors, particularly those seeking a degree that will allow them to teach any language (including both L1 and L2) at any educational level. It is anchored in a critical interdisciplinary approach -- sociolinguistics, applied linguistics, Hispanic applied linguistics, linguistic anthropology, sociology, social psychology, race studies, Latinx studies, language acquisition, education, Hip-Hop studies -- that emphasizes the social, political and ideological dimensions of language. Its objective is to raise linguistic awareness through the implementation of antiracist language teaching methods in the language classroom.
ARHU158Y
Explorations in Arts and Humanities; The Democratic Medium: Printmaking and the Power of the Multiple
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restricted to first semester first year students in the College of Arts and Humanities.

The invention of the metal moveable-type printing press provided for the expansion of literacy and empowered the spread of revolutionary propaganda and eventually brought about democratic changes in many parts of the world. The Democratic Medium: Printmaking and the Power of the Multiple will introduce students to the history of printmaking and its power create change and consider its relationship to the present day and how the invention of the internet created similar ripple effects on increasing change in societies around the world, as seen in the current Black Lives Matter movement. Alongside discussions and lectures, students will gain hands-on experience in the creation of printed materials through the department of Art's printmaking studio.
ARHU158Z
Explorations in Arts and Humanities; Creative Process in Dance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restricted to first semester first year students in the College of Arts and Humanities.

Give yourself permission to dive into the unknown in this movement-based class; to move freely, to think creatively, to search for your own voice, and to work by yourself as well as collaboratively with others. Discover and unleash your deeper self through the invigorating and restorative power of dance. Focusing on modern, contemporary, experimental dance and physical theater; this class asks you to engage with the visual and kinetic nature of the art form, to study different approaches to inspiration, experimentation, movement vocabulary, research, content building, and structure. No prior dance experience required.
ARHU275
Scriptwriting for Theater, Film, and Television
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Cross-listed with: ENGL275.
Credit only granted for: ENGL275 or ARHU275.
Introduction to the theory and practice of scriptwriting with an opportunity to read, view, evaluate, write, and revise texts meant to be performed. Students will practice writing for the stage, film, and television and also examine selected scripts, performances, and film and television clips as models for their own creative work. Students will complete frequent writing exercises, participate in workshops, and learn to apply scholarship to the analysis and critique of scripts.
ARHU319A
(Perm Req)
Writers' House Second Year Colloquium: Form and Theory of Creative Writing; Prose
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
For Writers' House students only. For further details please contact Johnna Schmidt jmschmid@umd.edu. The first class period will be conducted online, at which point the schedule for the rest of the semester will be distributed.
ARHU319B
(Perm Req)
Writers' House Second Year Colloquium: Form and Theory of Creative Writing; Poetry
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
For Writers' House students only. For further details please contact Johnna Schmidt jmschmid@umd.edu.
ARHU340
Financial Entrepreneurship for Arts Leaders
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Cross-listed with: MUSC448E.
Credit only granted for: ARHU340 or MUSC448E.
An introduction to financial entrepreneurship for the arts leader in order to prepare students for diverse and ever-changing careers in the arts and creative fields. Topics explored will include Professional Paperwork (resumes, cover letters, biographies, job searches), Financial Literacy (taxes, budgets, boards, tickets sales, musicians unions), Marketing (website development, social media, press packets, record labels vs. online distribution, headshots, audience development, community engagement, branded content), Communication (public speaking, writing), and Technology (online tools, computer software, peripherals, recording, photography/videography, on campus resources).
ARHU375
(Perm Req)
The TV Writers Room Screenwriting for Television and Video
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ARHU275, ARHU318, or FILM370; and permission of instructor.
Additional information: Priority in enrollment will be given to students participating in the Jimenez-Porter Writers' House and FILM studies programs.
Students engage with the theory and practice of screenwriting for television and video. Students read and watch teleplays designed to teach advantages of the television format. Students apply what they learn to prepare frequent writing exercises, share and provide feedback for peers scripts in a workshop format, and work together as a Writers Room to prepare an original pilot episode.
ARHU386
(Perm Req)
Experiential Learning
Credits: 3 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Permission of ARHU-College of Arts & Humanities.
Restriction: Junior standing or higher.
ARTH
Art History & Archaeology Department Site
ARTH260
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Can art effect social change? How may we use the history of radical and avant-garde art to inform present-day movements and models of artistic and creative activism? This course explores the modern and contemporary history of political art and arts activism on local, national, and global scales.
ARTH260C
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Can art effect social change? How may we use the history of radical and avant-garde art to inform present-day movements and models of artistic and creative activism? This course explores the modern and contemporary history of political art and arts activism on local, national, and global scales.
Restricted to students in Carillon Communities.
ARTH386
Experiential Learning
Credits: 3 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Permission of ARHU-Art History & Archaeology department.
Restriction: Junior standing or higher.
Supervised internship experience in diverse areas of art historical, archaeological, and museological work.
Contact department for information to register for this course.
ARTT
Art Studio Department Site
ARTT100
Two-Dimensional Design Fundamentals
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Principles and elements of two-dimensional design. Introduction to visual communication.
Students must pay a $40.00 laboratory studio fee.
ARTT110
Elements of Drawing I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Fundamental concepts, media, and processes of drawing. Emphasis on observation and representation in combination with individual expression. Subject matter includes still life, human figure, nature, the built environment, and conceptual projects.
Students must pay a $40.00 laboratory studio fee.
ARTT110S
Elements of Drawing I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Fundamental concepts, media, and processes of drawing. Emphasis on observation and representation in combination with individual expression. Subject matter includes still life, human figure, nature, the built environment, and conceptual projects.
Restricted to College Park Scholars - Arts. Students must pay a $40.00 laboratory studio fee.
ASTR
Astronomy Department Site
ASTR310
Observational Astronomy
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ASTR121; and (PHYS171 or PHYS161). Or permission of CMNS-Astronomy department.
Restriction: Must be in Astronomy program.
Introduction to current optical observational techniques, with brief coverage of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray techniques. Statistics, spherical trigonometry time, catalogs, geometrical and physical optics, telescopes, and optical instruments. Effects of the atmosphere. Practical work at the observatory using a CCD camera. Some nighttime observing sessions.
BMGT
Business and Management Department Site
BMGT190H
Introduction to Design and Quality
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must be in the Quest program.
Cross-listed with ENES190.
Credit only granted for: BMGT190 or ENES190.
QUEST students learn and apply design practices to design new products and services. Working in multidisciplinary teams, students use quality and process improvement methods to identify, analyze, and recommend solutions to real-world problems.
Restricted to Quest Program students.

A Fearless Ideas Course from the Academy for Innovation & Entrepreneurship (AIE): Click here for more information on the Fearless Ideas Courses.
BMGT207
Technology, Society and the Future of Humanity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
New emerging and converging technologies (such as blockchain, AI, and synthetic biology) are disrupting business-as-usual in fields as diverse as finance, supply chain, medicine and the creative industries. This course deals with the question of how we should use technology to create ethical economic and social systems that reflect the kind of world we want to exist in 25, 50, 100 years from now. Our ideas of what humanity considers to be a "good life" will influence and govern how disruptive technologies can either contribute to it or lead to a dystrophic future.
BMGT289A
Social Enterprise: Changing the World through Innovation and Transformative Action
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
In this course, students will hear from real-life social entrepreneurs, explore current day social issues of sustainability, climate change, leadership, disruptive innovations, and create or blueprint business plans to generate positive social change. This class will focus on innovative thinking skills, personal narratives, and social interaction strategies and plans.
BMGT289B
How Do Innovators Think?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
In this course, students will learn about: a) the innovation process and the role of the individual in generating innovations and b) the attributes, habits, and skills of individuals who have successfully started innovative new businesses or significantly added value to an existing company.
Credit will be granted for only one of the following: BMGT289B or HONR289P.
BMGT289D
Frauds, Scams, and Thefts: What, How and Why?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
The primary objective of this course is for students to gain a conceptual understanding of how fraud occurs, how it can be prevented, and how fraud can be detected through practical application of skills and tools. This course provides general background relating to fraud (e.g. history, prevalence, psychology), and it delves into the myriad types of fraud, scams and theft. This course also examines the trends in fraud detection and investigation; and introduces and explores with students the constant tension between public order and civil liberties in white collar crime, forensics, and hacking.
BMGT289E
Entrepreneurial Thinking for Non-Business Majors: How Not to Miss Great Opportunities Your Life Throws at You
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
In this course, students learn how to analyze the world around them and then notice and define new trends, emerging problems, impending gaps, and how to turn these into exciting opportunities by providing creative solutions. Students will have a chance to not only sharpen their critical thinking skills, but also learn how to take initiative, develop a working solution, identify and resolve conflicts, and be confident and persistent, yet flexible enough to respond to changes. Student teams identify a compelling problem in present day life and then propose a creative solution taking into account possible difficulties in implementation. In addition, students will also be given problems on a much smaller scale and asked to create and present a workable solution. Students will be exposed to how a visionary's mind works and the creative solution process. In addition, students will also learn how entrepreneurial thinking can improve their day-to-day life.
BMGT289I
Why Good Managers Make Bad Decisions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
This course provides an overview of the concepts, approaches, and vocabulary of evidence-based management (EBM) and provides an understanding of how experts in many disciplines can employ evidenced based decision making. EBM is an emerging movement in business to explicitly use the current best information in management decision making with special emphasis on relevant scientific findings and unbiased organizational facts. The course stresses how individuals practicing EBM learn how to rethink their approaches to data and knowledge in order to make more effective decisions.
Why do smart managers make flawed decisions? Why do managers keep believing they have made the right choice, even with disastrous results staring them in the face? Why Good Managers Make Bad Decisions will address how evidence-based management and other decisionmaking tools can be used to uncover hidden assumptions in the corner offices of great corporations.
BMGT289J
Exploring Leadership: Are Hidden Forces at Work?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Addresses key dimensions of leadership behavior: personal integrity, self-awareness, vision, emotional intelligence, personality, communication, organizational competence, and empowering people and teams. The course invites students on a journey of professional exploration, understanding and development--with the explicit goal of enabling students to embark on a path of personal leadership development. To achieve this goal, the course offers an extensive examination of leadership in organizations and provides students with a set of experiences that are designed to enhance their self-awareness and capacity for effective leadership. Opportunities are provided through assessments, simulations, group exercises, discussion, case studies and readings to develop leadership skills and the capability to motivate, collaborate, negotiate, manage group dynamics, and communicate effectively. Through the academic study of leadership, self-assessments, practice and reflection, students learn the strengths and limitations of their own leadership style that will assist them in becoming a more effective leader.
BMGT461
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must not have completed BMGT361.
Credit only granted for: BMGT261, BMGT361, BMGT461, ENES460, SMLP470 or HLMN470.
Process of creating new ventures, including evaluating the entrepreneurial team, the opportunity and the financing requirements. Skills, concepts, mental attitudes and knowledge relevant for starting a new business.
BMGT461M
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must not have completed BMGT361.
Credit only granted for: BMGT261, BMGT361, BMGT461, ENES460, SMLP470 or HLMN470.
Process of creating new ventures, including evaluating the entrepreneurial team, the opportunity and the financing requirements. Skills, concepts, mental attitudes and knowledge relevant for starting a new business.
Restricted to Innovation & Entrepreneurship Minors (#BU03).
BMGT461N
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must not have completed BMGT361.
Credit only granted for: BMGT261, BMGT361, BMGT461, ENES460, SMLP470 or HLMN470.
Process of creating new ventures, including evaluating the entrepreneurial team, the opportunity and the financing requirements. Skills, concepts, mental attitudes and knowledge relevant for starting a new business.
Open to all non-BMGT majors with 72 credit hours completed. BMGT majors should register for BMGT 461.
BMGT490H
QUEST Capstone Professional Practicum
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ENES390 or BMGT390.
Cross-listed with: ENES490.
Credit only granted for: BMGT490 or ENES490.
The capstone course for the QUEST Honors Program provides students with an opportunity to learn in multidisciplinary teams of business, engineering, and science students in a real-world setting. Companies engage teams of QUEST students with real organizational challenges and dedicate resources to help students address these problems. Student teams must enhance their skills in quality management, process improvement, and systems design and will apply these to add value to a client. In the process, students will improve their teamwork skills.
Restricted to Quest Program students.
BMGT495
Strategic Management
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
A case-based course where students learn to play the role of the "strategic manager" who defines the scope of its business operations and, within the chosen scope, how the firm will compete against rivals. This course focuses on how a firm can both formulate effective business-level and corporate-level strategies to achieve competitive advantage and earn above average profits.
Restricted to BMGT students with 60 credit hours completed.
BSCI
Biological Sciences Program Department Site
BSCI150
Beyond Race: Human Biological Diversity
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL or DSSP, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: BSCI189I or BSCI150.
Formerly: BSCI189I.
Provides the scientific evidence for rejecting race as a biological concept. The course covers basic biology, human evolution, human phylogenetics, and a critique of race as an explanation of human traits.
BSOS
Behavioral and Social Sciences
BSOS201
Ensuring your Financial Future Through Stock Investing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: BSOS289I or BSOS201.
Formerly: BSOS289I.
Additional information: No prior knowledge of the stock market or investing is expected or required.
Introduces students to investing and trading, with special emphasis on the field of technical analysis. Planning for one's financial future is a critical skill for all students. Students will learn how to evaluate companies using the investors.com website and the TC2000 stock charting program. Students will develop an idea of the risks and benefits of investing, establishing a savings strategy, opening an IRA, and strategically planning for future financial security. In addition to readings, lectures, and online videos, students will participate in virtual stock market trading exercises and manage a virtual account.
BSOS355
(Perm Req)
Social Sciences Internship Practicum
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must have earned a minimum of 60 credits; and minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5; and must have completed at least 1 semester at UMD.
Credit only granted for: BSOS388I or BSOS355.
Formerly: BSOS388I.
BSOS 355 is an internship course open to all majors. It will enable students to articulate and apply the scholarship from the discipline related to their specific internship placement into a real-work environment.
CCJS
Criminology and Criminal Justice Department Site
CCJS225
Responses to Violence
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
Conflict is unfortunately resolved through violence in a number of settings. It ranges from interpersonal to international in its scope. This course investigates the strengths and weakness of a number of resolutions to reducing violence over the course of history using both state centered and informal control.
CCJS300
(Perm Req)
Criminological and Criminal Justice Research Methods
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: CCJS100 and CCJS105; and (PSYC200, CCJS200, ECON321, BMGT230, or SOCY201).
Introduction to the formulation of research questions covering crime and justice, research designs, data collection, and interpretation and reporting in criminological and justice-system settings.
CMSC
Computer Science Department Site
CMSC122
Introduction to Computer Programming via the Web
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must not have completed any courses from CMSC131-499 course range; and must not be concurrently enrolled in CMSC131.
Credit only granted for: CMSC106, or CMSC122.
Introduction to computer programming in the context of developing full featured dynamic web sites. Uses a problem solving approach to teach basics of program design and implementation using JavaScript; relates these skills to creation of dynamic web sites; then explores both the potential and limits of web-based information sources for use in research. Intended to help relate a student's major to these emerging technologies.
COMM
Communication Department Site
COMM386
(Perm Req)
Experiential Learning
Credits: 3 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Permission of ARHU-Communication department.
Restriction: Junior standing or higher; and must be in Communication program.
Supervised internship experience with communication professionals. Relation of academic training to professional experience.
CPGH
College Park Scholars-Global Public Health
CPGH200
College Park Scholars: Global Public Health Second-Year Colloquium
Credits: 1
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: CPGH101.
Restriction: Students must be enrolled in the College Park Scholars Global Public Health (CPGH) program.
Building on knowledge and skills gained from the first-year colloquia, students will develop public health interventions that address a public health issue of a particular community.
CPSP
College Park Scholars Program Department Site
CPSP339J
Advanced Practicum: Internship; Media, Self and Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
CPSP339P
Advanced Practicum: Internship
Credits: 1 - 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
CPSP349T
Advanced Practicum: Service Learning; STS Infrastructure and Society Service Learning Project
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
CPSS
College Park Scholars-Science, Technology and Society
CPSS240
College Park Scholars: Science, Technology & Society - Service-Learning Practicum
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Restriction: Matriculation into the College Park Scholars Science, Technology & Society (CPSS) program; or permission of instructor.
Supervised Service-Learning practicum in issues related to science, technology and society.
Most of the class times will be spent at area Prince George's schools with partnering robotics teams. Consult the class requirements and locations provided in the syllabus at the beginning of the class.

This course requires a $61 background check fee for working in Prince Georges County K-12 schools.
DANC
DANC200
Introduction to Dance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
A study of dance as a form of communication and as an art form; a survey of the theories and styles of dance, and their relationships to other art forms.
DANC200S
Introduction to Dance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
A study of dance as a form of communication and as an art form; a survey of the theories and styles of dance, and their relationships to other art forms.
Restricted to College Park Scholars - Arts.
EDCP
Education Counseling and Personnel Services Department Site
EDCP210
Peer Counseling Skills and Mental Health Advocacy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must not have completed EDCP310; and must not have completed PSYC433.
Credit only granted for: EDCP210, EDCP310, or PSYC433.
Introduction to core helping skills in peer counseling settings and three predominant theoretical approaches used in the counseling field (humanistic, psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral). The course also explores mental health stigma and advocacy. Students will build an understanding of the practical application of underlying principles and theory in counseling and the helping professions, while exploring their own, and societal, biases, assumptions, and attitudes toward mental health.
EDCP230
The Science and Practice of Happiness and Psychological Well-Being
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP
An introduction to theory and research on positive psychology, subjective well-being, and the psychology of happiness. This will include examination of hedonic and eudaimonic models of well-being and sociocultural understandings of happiness, together with how it relates to health, relationships, money, religion, work, and social media. Students will also explore common misconceptions and myths about happiness and well-being and will engage in a variety of activities designed to deepen their understanding of happiness in their own lives and broader societal trends related to well-being.
EDHD
Education, Human Development Department Site
EDHD220
(Perm Req)
Exploring Early Childhood General and Special Education
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Permission of EDUC-Human Development and Quantitative Methodology department.
Students who are considering a career in education will consider information about the teaching profession. Students reflect on their personal strengths, identify areas of growth, and examine their predisposition to work with young children with and without disabilities. They will discuss the nature of teaching, the moral and philosophic underpinnings that influenced their decision to enter into the teaching professions, as well as the roles and responsibilities of teachers and the characteristics and qualities for effective teachers (teaching styles and teacher's primary role in the classroom).
EDHD228
(Perm Req)
Research Experiences in Human Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Contact department for information to register for this course.
EDSP
Education, Special Department Site
EDSP220
Disability in Community: Access, Accommodation, and Adaptation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, DVCC
Examines the concept of disability in a variety of community settings. Drawing on classic and contemporary readings in psychology, sociology and special education, the course will couple conceptual and historical understanding of disability with first-hand service-learning experiences in the community. Students will develop a plan in several phases that encompasses principles of Universal Design for Living/Learning (UDL) to study and participate in community-based activities.
EDSP452
Internship I: Elementary/Middle Special Education
Credits: 2 - 4
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must be in Special Education program.
Jointly offered with EDSP692.
Credit only granted for: EDSP452 or EDSP692.
Field experience in elementary/middle school special education.
EDUC
Education
EDUC388
(Perm Req)
Special Topics in Education; Guided Experience In College Teaching
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
EDUC388E
Special Topics in Education; Controversial Issues in Education Reform
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Cross-listed with PLCY388E. Credit granted for EDUC388E or PLCY388E.
EDUC388T
(Perm Req)
Special Topics in Education; Guided Experience in College Teaching - UTA
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
EDUC388U
(Perm Req)
Special Topics in Education; New Student Programs
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
ENES
Engineering Science
ENES100
(Perm Req)
Introduction to Engineering Design
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Corequisite: MATH140.
Students work as teams to design and build a product using computer software for word-processing, spreadsheet, CAD, and communication skills.
ENES140
Discovering New Ventures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Additional information: This course may count as an elective for a student at the University of Maryland, depending on the student's specific degree program. It cannot be counted towards the requirements for the Smith School of Business Entrepreneurship Fellow Program.
Students explore dynamic company startup topics by working in teams to design a new venture. This multi-disciplinary course helps students to learn the basic business, strategy, and leadership skills needed to launch new ventures. Topics include learning how to assess the feasibility of a startup venture, as well as how to apply best practices for planning, launching, and managing new companies. Students discuss a wide range of issues of importance and concern to entrepreneurs and learn to recognize opportunities, assess the skills and talents of successful entrepreneurs, and learn models that help them navigate uncertainty.
ENES190H
Introduction to Design and Quality
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Must be in the Quest program.
Cross-listed with BMGT190.
Credit only granted for: BMGT190 or ENES190.
QUEST students learn and apply design practices to design new products and services. Working in multidisciplinary teams, students use quality and process improvement methods to identify, analyze, and recommend solutions to real-world problems.
First course in a sequence of four Total Quality Program Courses. Restricted to QUEST Honors Program students. Cross-listed with ENES190H.

A Fearless Ideas Course from the Academy for Innovation & Entrepreneurship (AIE): http://ter.ps/iamFEARLESS Click here for more information on the Fearless Ideas Courses.
ENES210
Entrepreneurial Opportunity Analysis and Decision-Making in 21st Century Technology Ventures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENES210 or ENES461.
This multi-disciplinary course helps students learn the principles of entrepreneurial opportunity analysis and decision-making in an increasingly dynamic and technically-inclined society. Emphasis is placed on how aspiring technology entrepreneurs can develop their entrepreneurial perspectives to develop winning entrepreneurial plans for their future ventures.
ENES317
(Perm Req)
Introduction to Engineering Leadership
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Permission of ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering.
Focus is placed on general leadership theories in addition to real-world applications of leadership in engineering education, industry, and government.
Restricted to students in the Engineering Leadership Development minor (#EN04) and the Global Engineering Leadership minor (#EN09). Students in these majors should contact globalengr@umd.edu to register.

All other students should complete this form for permission: https://go.umd.edu/gelpermission Permission will be granted to non-minor on the first day of classes.
ENES490H
QUEST Capstone Professional Practicum
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ENES390 or BMGT390.
Cross-listed with: BMGT490.
Credit only granted for: BMGT490 or ENES490.
The capstone course for the QUEST Honors Program provides students with an opportunity to learn in multidisciplinary teams of business, engineering, and science students in a real-world setting. Companies engage teams of QUEST students with real organizational challenges and dedicate resources to help students address these problems. Student teams must enhance their skills in quality management, process improvement, and systems design and will apply these to add value to a client. In the process, students will improve their teamwork skills.
Fourth course in a sequence of four Total Quality Program Courses. Restricted to QUEST Honors Program students.
ENGL
English Department Site
ENGL271
Writing Poems and Stories: An Introductory Workshop
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Introduction to theory and practice of writing fiction and poetry. Emphasis on critical reading of literary models. Exercises and workshop discussions with continual reference to modeling, drafting, and revising as necessary stages in a creative process.
ENGL272
Writing Fiction: A Beginning Workshop
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Introduction to theory and practice of writing fiction. Emphasis on critical reading of literary models. Exercises and workshop discussions with continual reference to modeling, drafting, and revising as necessary stages in a creative process.
ENGL273
Writing Poetry: A Beginning Workshop
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Introduction to theory and practice of writing poetry. Emphasis on critical reading of literary models. Exercises and workshop discussions with continual reference to modeling, drafting, and revising as necessary stages in a creative process.
ENGL275
Scriptwriting for Theater, Film, and Television
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Cross-listed with: ARHU275.
Credit only granted for: ENGL275 or ARHU275.
Introduction to the theory and practice of scriptwriting with an opportunity to read, view, evaluate, write, and revise texts meant to be performed. Students will practice writing for the stage, film, and television and also examine selected scripts, performances, and film and television clips as models for their own creative work. Students will complete frequent writing exercises, participate in workshops, and learn to apply scholarship to the analysis and critique of scripts.
Cross-listed with ARHU275.
ENGL290
Introduction to Digital Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Introductory course in digital studies. Surveys contemporary humanities work in digital technologies, including the web and social media and their historical antecedents. Explores design and making as analytical tools alongside reading and writing. Situates digital media within power and politics and develops critical awareness of how media shape society and ethics. Interdisciplinary approaches to creativity, analysis, and technology. While the course will include hands-on practice, no prior experience of programming, designing, or making required other than a willingness to experiment and play.
ENGL291
Writing, Revising, Persuading
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Prerequisite: Must have satisfied Fundamental Studies Academic Writing requirement.
Intermediate-level, writing-intensive course for students who have successfully satisfied the Fundamental Studies Academic Writing requirement but wish to hone skills in analyzing and producing rhetorically attuned, well-styled prose. Deeper study of rhetorical theory and its application to a wide variety of arguments and situations. Additional writing practice, techniques of revision, study of effect of stylistic choices. Topics may include argumentation theory, visual rhetoric, stylistic theory, and writing theory.
ENGL293
Writing in the Wireless World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Recommended: ENGL101.
A hands-on exploration of writing at the intersection of technology and rhetoric. Students will learn to read, analyze, and compose the kinds of multimodal documents--documents combining text, image, and sound--that constitute communication in our digital world.
ENGL297
Introduction to Professional Writing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ENGL101.
Introduction to the rhetorical principles and professional practices of professional writing, particularly the research, writing, communication, analytical, and technological skills needed for the Professional Writing minor. How culture and technology relate to the work of professional writing; design principles and rhetorical moves; digital tools, research skills, and writing strategies of professional writers. Develops skills needed to publish a writing portfolio that showcases students' professional writing competencies and projects your professional writer identities.
ENGL388P
(Perm Req)
English Careers Internship
Credits: 1 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Permission of ARHU-English department. Repeatable to 12 credits if content differs.
Additional information: Each enrolled credit equals 45 hours of on-site internship work.
Students receive credit for an internship of their choice that focuses at least half of its work on core English skills such as writing, editing, and research. Students secure their own internship placements. Course assignments include, for instance, an activity log, reflection papers, a supervisor evaluation, and a final portfolio of work.
Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 12 credits. Contact english@umd.edu.
ENGL388V
(Perm Req)
Undergraduate Teaching Assistants in English
Credits: 1 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Permission of the ARHU-English department. Repeatable to 12 credits.
Additional information: Students should consult with the UTA Coordinator to determine the number of enrollment credits.
A weekly teaching practicum and concurrent internship as an undergraduate teaching assistant in an English course. Students will explore the theories and best practices of teaching and learning in the various fields of the English discipline, particularly writing and literary studies. The emphasis is on creating inclusive classrooms and working with diverse learners and is grounded in theories of critical pedagogy. Students will apply principles of learning theory to develop and facilitate learner-centered lessons and discussions. They will also study composition pedagogy in preparation for responding to student writing in the course for which they are an assistant.
Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 12 credits. Contact Lyra Hilliard, lyrahill@umd.edu. Students taking ENGL388V for the first time should register for section 0101 or 0401 for 4 credits. When taking the course again in subsequent semesters, students should register for 2001 or 3001 for 3 credits.
ENGL388W
(Perm Req)
Writing Center Internship
Credits: 1 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Permission of the Writing Center (1205 Tawes Hall). Repeatable to 12 credits.
Examines face-to-face and online writing center theory and practice through readings, exercises, and supervised tutoring. Students investigate the writing process and help other writers to negotiate it.
Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 12 credits. To apply, go to http://www.english.umd.edu/academics/writingcenter/internship Students taking ENGL388W for the first time should register for section 0101 for 4 credits. When taking the course again in subsequent semesters, students should register for 2001.
ENSP
Environmental Science and Policy Department Site
ENSP400
(Perm Req)
Capstone in Environmental Science and Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ENSP101; and ENSP102.
Restriction: Must be in Environmental Science and Policy program; and senior standing; and permission of the Environmental Science and Policy Program.
Integration of physical, biological, and social sciences with applications to environmental science and policy. Problem-solving and multi-disciplinary case study evaluations pertinent to contemporary and future issues related to the environment.
ENST
Environmental Science and Technology Department Site
ENST472
(Perm Req)
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must be in a major within AGNR-Environmental Science & Technology department; and permission of AGNR-Environmental Science & Technology department.
Additional information: This is the pinnacle course for students majoring in ENST and is therefore recommended in one of the students' final semesters.
This capstone course focuses on professional project preparation, presentation, and critical evaluation on environmental science research. Students will develop and present original projects and critique projects presented by others.
FGSM
Federal and Global Fellows
FGSM398
(Perm Req)
Federal and Global Experiential Learning
Credits: 3 - 9
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Cross-listed with HNUH398P. Credit only granted for FGSM398 or HNUH398P.
FIRE
First-Year Innovation & Research Experience
FIRE120
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Additional information: This is the first course in the FIRE (First-Year Innovation & Research Experience) program sequence.
Engages the research process through the design, research, collaborative authorship and iterative review-based refinement of research proposals. Students find and analyze primary literature, think creatively, author and communicate research proposals in a scholarly fashion and work collaboratively to solve scientific and societal problems using technology, delegation and productive team communication.
FMSC
Family Science Department Site
FMSC302
Research Methods in Family Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP
Prerequisite: Must have completed an introductory statistics course.
Restriction: Must be in a major within SPHL-Family Science department.
Credit only granted for: FMSC302 or FMST302.
Formerly: FMST302.
Introduction to the methods of the social and behavioral sciences employed in family science. The role of theory, the development of hypotheses, measurement, design, and data analysis.
FMSC341
Personal and Family Finance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Credit only granted for: FMSC341 or FMST341.
Formerly: FMST341.
Individual and family financial strategies with emphasis on financial planning, savings, investments, insurance, income taxes, housing, and use of credit. Planning, analyzing, and controlling financial resources to resolve personal/family financial problems and to attain financial security.
GEMS
Gemstone
GEMS202
Team Dynamics and Research Methodology
Credits: 2
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: GEMS100, GEMS102, and GEMS104.
Corequisite: GEMS296.
Restriction: Must be in the Gemstone program; and sophomore standing or higher.
This experiential course is designed to foster an understanding of effective team dynamics and basic research methodology. It will teach skills applicable to Gemstone team research and the writing of a team thesis. Upperclass Gemstone students serve as discussion facilitators. Students participate in their Gemstone teams and develop a draft of their team thesis proposal.
GEMS497
Team Thesis Defense
Credits: 2
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: GEMS396.
Restriction: Must be in the Gemstone program.
Gemstone teams will complete the team research project and thesis. The team will formally present the thesis to experts in the area of interest at a Team Thesis Conference before final submission.
GEOL
Geology Department Site
GEOL394
(Perm Req)
Geology Senior Thesis II: Research
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: GEOL393; and must have completed at least three upper level GEOL courses.
Restriction: Must be in Geology program; and junior standing or higher.
The second semester of the two-semester Geology Senior Thesis. Investigation of specific original research question in geosciences. Emphasis is on completion of original research proposed in GEOL393 and presentation of results both in writing and in public presentations that adhere to geosciences professional standards.
Contact department for information to register for this course.
GVPT
Government and Politics Department Site
GVPT201
Scope and Methods for Political Science Research
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Credit only granted for: GVPT100 or GVPT201.
Formerly: GVPT100.
An introduction to empirical research in political science.
GVPT241
The Study of Political Philosophy: Ancient and Modern
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Examines some of the salient continuities and breaks between the ancient and modern traditions in Western political philosophy.
GVPT273
Introduction to Environmental Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
An overview of modern environmental philosophy, politics, and policy, exploring environmental politics in the US by way of comparison with other developed and developing countries.
GVPT356
(Perm Req)
Capstone in International Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVCC
Prerequisite: GVPT354.
Restriction: Enrollment is restricted to students in the Minor in International Development and Conflict Management; and sophomore standing or higher; and permission of BSOS-Government & Politics department.
Serves as one of the two capstone courses for the Minor in International Development and Conflict Management. Focuses on advanced theory and the practice and profession of international development and is designed to provide students an introduction to, and a chance to engage with, a core set of practical skills relevant to the field.
HACS
ACES-Cybersecurity
HACS200
Applied Cybersecurity Foundations II
Credits: 2
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in HACS101.
Restriction: Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living-Learning Program.
Students will apply the skills learned in HACS 100 and 101 to practice cybersecurity research through team led projects employing honeypots, carrying that project through all stages - proposal, implementation, and analysis. Weekly lectures will supplement project work by addressing trends observed in honeypot attacks and protections needed, along with data collection and analysis tools, and other foundational cybersecurity concepts.
Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living-Learning Program.
HACS208N
Seminar in Cybersecurity; Digital Forensics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living Learning Program
HACS287
(Perm Req)
Undergraduate Research in Cybersecurity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living-Learning Program; and permission of UGST-HCOL-ACES Cybersecurity Program.
The Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students (ACES) program encourages its students to engage in research in order to gain greater insight into a specific area within cybersecurity, obtain an appreciation for the subtleties and difficulties associated with the production of knowledge and fundamental new applications, and to prepare for graduate school and the workforce.
Contact department for information to register for this course.
HDCC
Design Cultures and Creativity
HDCC208C
Seminar in Digital Cultures and Creativity; Sound Cultures and Practices
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
HDCC208F
Seminar in Digital Cultures and Creativity; Creativity through Visual Communication
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
HDCC208G
Seminar in Digital Cultures and Creativity; Monstrosity in Media and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
HDCC208O
Seminar in Digital Cultures and Creativity; Critical Data Modeling
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
HESI
Higher Ed, Student Affairs, and International Ed Policy
HESI217
Introduction to Student Leadership
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Freshman standing; or sophomore standing.
Introduction to leadership theories, concepts, and skills. Completion of personal and leadership self-assessments, values exploration, and small group application.
This course will survey the study and practice of leadership and provide students with a variety of experiences to wrestle with large leadership questions. What is leadership? Who can be a leader? How is leadership an important aspect of understanding self and others? Students will explore and respond to these questions through a variety of leadership theories and models, self-assessments, critical reflection, active-learning, group projects, and research. Students must pay a $32 materials fee. Contact leadershipstudies@umd.edu with questions.
HESP
Hearing and Speech Sciences Department Site
HESP120
Introduction to Linguistics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP
Additional information: HESP120 is required for HESP majors. HESP majors may not substitute LING200.
An introduction to the scientific study of natural language with focus on the basic concepts of phonology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics, with subsequent attention to the applied aspects of linguistic principles.
HIST
History Department Site
HIST408F
(Perm Req)
Senior Seminar; State Secrets: Writing the History of the Central Intelligence Agnecy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
HIST408I
Senior Seminar; Literature and Jewish Life in Eastern Europe
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
We will read and discuss literary works by different authors describing Jewish life in Eastern Europe, and examine their contribution to the myths, images, and historiography of Eastern European Jewry. Scholarly articles will help us analyze the specific historical conditions that served as background for the different literary works.
HIST408K
(Perm Req)
Senior Seminar; Antisemitism: Classic, Modern, and New
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
HIST408O
(Perm Req)
Senior Seminar; Wet History: The Chesapeake Bay and its Watershed
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
HIST408T
(Perm Req)
Senior Seminar; Writing Lives: History and Biography
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
HIST408V
(Perm Req)
Senior Seminar; Illegality, Rights, and Resistance in US Immigration History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
HLTH
HLTH391
(Perm Req)
Making a Difference: Applying Community Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: SPHL100, HLTH124, HLTH140, HLTH200, HLTH230, EPIB301, EPIB315, BSCI170, BSCI201, and HLTH302. Students must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in HLTH364.
Corequisite: HLTH420 and HLTH490.
Restriction: Must be in a major within the SPHL-Behavioral and Community Health department.
The exploration and application of community health concepts including theoretical models, advocacy, cultural competency, asset mapping, and needs assessment. Includes planning, implementing and evaluating a community health program with a designated community partner.
Both sections (0101, 0201) shared with HLTH391H.
HLTH391H
(Perm Req)
Making a Difference: Applying Community Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: SPHL100, HLTH124, HLTH140, HLTH200, HLTH230, EPIB301, EPIB315, BSCI170, BSCI201, and HLTH302. Students must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in HLTH364.
Corequisite: HLTH420 and HLTH490.
Restriction: Must be in a major within the SPHL-Behavioral and Community Health department.
The exploration and application of community health concepts including theoretical models, advocacy, cultural competency, asset mapping, and needs assessment. Includes planning, implementing and evaluating a community health program with a designated community partner.
HNUH
University Honors
HNUH219P
Transform Maryland: Theories into Practice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
In this intensive, 10-person seminar, students undertake a real-world consulting engagement for their client, the University of Maryland, to improve one of its operational processes. Working as a consulting team, students apply analysis, user-centered design, behavioral and social science methods in order to identify opportunities for innovation and recommend solutions. The one-semester engagement is broken into four phases--Frame, Explore, Analyze, and Recommend--through which students assess the potential for changing operations, addressing political differences, and the potential for technology to augment the streamlined process. The practicum focuses on transforming critical university administrative and business functions and culminates in a presentation to key members of the University of Maryland leadership team. The specific project changes from semester to semester.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH219P is the second course in the "Transform Maryland" Theory/Practice track. HNUH219T is the prerequisite for HNUH219P.
HNUH229P
Climate in Crisis: Strategy and Advocacy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
This theory and practice track examines theoretical frameworks for understanding climate change and concrete cases that shed light on the complexity of managing it. In this, the practical component of the Climate in Crisis track, we explore several domestic energy and climate policy case studies, examining the competing roles played by various interest groups that influence legislative and regulatory outcomes, with a focus on differing organizational advocacy strategies. Once we have mastered organizational advocacy strategies, students bring those tools to bear on the most recent US Federal policy mandates and legislation. In 229T, students will complement this work with a deep dive into the nature of public goods and climate change policy, among other crucial considerations.
HNUH258A
Harvesting Big Data to Examine Agriculture and Climate Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Can agricultural production keep up with climate change? Data analytics and data science are driving the force behind the digital revolution, which has changed the way we are able to analyze and interpret the world. The explosion of data offers both opportunities and challenges that require new tools and methods of analysis. This course applies sophisticated digital tools to an age-old concern: the impact of environmental change and extreme weather on agricultural productivity. In this hands-on introduction to data analysis and visualization with real-world data, students acquire the tools to understand the impacts of environmental change and more.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the "Information & Power" thematic cluster. Information & Power courses will be offered through Spring 2023.
HNUH268Z
Body Boundaries: The science behind asexuality, coloniality, and immortality
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Formerly: HONR258A.
Animal bodies have clear boundaries across space and time - or do they? Although the most familiar animals have clearly delimited bodies and persist only for a certain amount of time, evolution has produced many remarkable animals that defy simple definitions of bodies. Some animals shatter their bodies into pieces to reproduce, generating a collection of identical clones. Others remain physically attached to their siblings or offspring - coordinating activities across attached individuals and functioning as a meta-organism. Still others continually renew their bodies and attain immortality. In this seminar, we will explore the naturally-occurring phenomena that challenge our concept of body. As we analyze the complex ways that bodies relate to one another in the world and broaden the definition of body, students will engage in authentic scientific practices with transferable skills.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the "Body Politics" thematic cluster. Body Politics courses will be offered through Spring 2023.
HNUH398P
(Perm Req)
Federal and Global Experiential Learning
Credits: 3 - 9
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Permission of instructor. Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs.
Cross-listed with: FGSM398.
Credit only granted for: FGSM398 or HNUH398P.
This is the experiential course component of the Federal Fellows Program and Global Fellows Program.
HONR
HONR299F
Honors Seminar; Financial Crises: The Foundation of Global Tension
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
INAG
Institute of Applied Agriculture Department Site
INAG123
People, Planet, and Profit: Digging Into Sustainable Agriculture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Investigates the principles and practices of sustainable agriculture and their relationship to the greater food system. Explores the social (people), environmental (planet), and economic (profit) impacts of agriculture - from challenges to opportunities. INAG123 applies the principles of sustainability to various agricultural production practices and systems - at a range of different scales - to see what lessons these varied models can offer. Along the way, we will consider domestic issues such as food safety and distribution, food justice, cultural relevance, biodiversity, farming communities, and effects on local economies.
Students will have in person field trips scheduled and must provide their own transportation (actual dates to be determined).
INAG242
Golf Course Design and Construction
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
An appreciation and understanding of the game of golf is obtained through lectures on the history, organizations, and rules of the game. Golf course design theories, great architects and their courses, and construction specifications are discussed. Students will complete two golf course design projects.
INST
Information Studies
INST123
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
An introduction to relational databases for students with no previous programming experience. Provides a means for students of diverse backgrounds to successfully learn how to store, retrieve, and maintain data in relational databases. Topics include a brief comparison of database systems with an emphasis on relational databases, fundamental relational database concepts, and data types. Includes technical approaches to accessing information stored in relational databases.
INST152
"Fake Checking": Battling Misinformation and Disinformation in the Real World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Examining the phenomenon of "fake news" using the principles of information literacy, students will develop their skills in locating, analyzing, and evaluating different information sources -- in the classroom, in their personal lives, and in the workplace.
INST327
Database Design and Modeling
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in INST126.
Restriction: Must be in the Information Science program.
Credit only granted for: INST327 or BMGT402.
Introduction to databases, the relational model, entity-relationship diagrams, user-oriented database design and normalization, and Structured Query Language (SQL). Through labs, tests, and a project, students develop both theoretical and practical knowledge of relational database systems.
Students who wish to register should contact the College of Information Studies.
JOUR
Journalism Department Site
JOUR150
Introduction to Mass Communication
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP
Additional information: Not applicable toward journalism major.
Survey of the functions and effects of the mass media in the United States. A consumer's introduction to newspapers, television, radio, film, sound recording, books, magazines, and new media technology.
JOUR175
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Additional information: Not applicable toward journalism major.
An analysis of the information, values and underlying messages conveyed via television, newspapers, the internet, magazines, radio and film. Examines the accuracy of those messages and explores how media shape views of politics, culture and society.
JOUR325
(Perm Req)
Capital News Service Bureau
Credits: 9
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: JOUR320; and permission of JOUR-Philip Merrill College of Journalism.
Advanced journalism training. Students report as part of college's Capital News Service program.
Jointly offered with JOUR625. Students must contact the instructor for permission to register.

Washington, DC students should enroll in section 0101. Annapolis students should enroll in section 0201. College Park students should enroll in section 0301 or section 0401, depenging on their bureau.
JOUR327
(Perm Req)
Urban Affairs Reporting
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: JOUR320; and permission of instructor.
Jointly offered with JOUR627.
Credit only granted for: JOUR327 or JOUR627.
Students are immersed in coverage of issues affecting cities, working on a semester-long multi-platform reporting project based in Baltimore.
Students will use Baltimore as a working laboratory to report on urban issues. Course meets in Baltimore.
JOUR353
(Perm Req)
News Bureau: Multimedia Reporting
Credits: 6
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: JOUR352; and permission of JOUR-Philip Merrill College of Journalism; and (JOUR320 or JOUR360).
Advanced reporting and writing in an online environment focusing on multimedia, non-traditional storytelling and investigative reporting.
JOUR355
(Perm Req)
News Bureau: Multimedia Editing and Production
Credits: 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: JOUR320 or JOUR360; and JOUR352; and permission of JOUR-Philip Merrill College of Journalism.
Advanced online journalism training. Students work as multimedia and social media editors and producers, building interactive content and special reports.
JOUR367
(Perm Req)
Broadcast News Bureau
Credits: 9
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: JOUR361; and permission of JOUR-Philip Merrill College of Journalism.
Advanced broadcast journalism training. Students report as part of the college's Capital News Service program.
Jointly offered with JOUR667.
JWST
Jewish Studies Department Site
JWST409A
Research Seminar in Jewish Studies; Literature and Jewish Life in Eastern Europe
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
We will read and discuss literary works by different authors describing Jewish life in Eastern Europe, and examine their contribution to the myths, images, and historiography of Eastern European Jewry. Scholarly articles will help us analyze the specific historical conditions that served as background for the different literary works.
KNES
Kinesiology Department Site
KNES214
Science and Methods of Personal Fitness Instruction
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Credit only granted for: KNES214 or KNES210 and KNES211, or KNES210 and KNES212, or KNES289N.
Formerly: KNES210/KNES211, KNES210/KNES212, and KNES289N.
Basic concepts of human anatomy, exercise physiology, applied kinesiology, nutrition and the physiology of exercise training. Includes the CORE knowledge required for the American Council on Exercise (ACE) Personal Trainer certification.
KNES497
(Perm Req)
Kinesiology Senior Seminar
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: A professional writing course with a minimum grade of C-; and must have completed 6 KNES core courses and 2 KNES option courses, all with a C- or higher; and must have completed STAT100 with a C- or better.
Restriction: Senior standing or higher; and must be in Kinesiology program; and permission of department.
Discussions of contemporary issues vital to the discipline, critiques of research in the student's area/areas of special interest, completion of a major project where the student will be asked to demonstrate the ability to carry out investigative processes in problem solving and critical writing under faculty direction.
Students may not be eligible to add or change their section if they did not attend class during schedule adjustment.
LARC
Landscape Architecture Department Site
LARC151
Urban Agriculture: Designing and Assessing Edible Landscapes
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Students will examine the growing development of urban agriculture and edible landscapes. Urban agriculture has seen a recent growth and interest in cities across the globe. From Paris to New York, from Baltimore to Detroit, urban agriculture is an emerging land use to address a variety of needs. Redevelopment, food deserts, community engagement and environmental justice are just some of the issues and topics that are connected to the recent growth of urban agriculture. This course will take a critical examination of urban agriculture's contribution to the food system, its input and outputs in the urban landscape, and the planning and design of urban agriculture and edible landscapes.
LARC160
Introduction to Landscape Architecture and Environmental Design
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
History, theory, philosophy and current practice of the profession of landscape architecture. Explores the interactive relationship between humans and their environment by examining people's perceptions of and changing attitude towards the landscape, as well as, an examination of how these are related to ecological and cultural influences. Topics include urban, ecological, community and creative design.
LGBT
Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Studies
LGBT350
(Perm Req)
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People and Communication
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVCC
Prerequisite: LGBT200; and permission of LGBT Studies Program.
Study of differences, stereotypes, and values distinguishing LGBT people and of effective means of communicating such differences to non-LGBT people. Emphasis on contemporary LGBT life and on the development of didactic skills. Preparation and presentation of forums on LGBT people; facilitation of workshops in various outreach locations (residence halls, Greek system, classes).
LGBT386
(Perm Req)
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Community Organization Internship
Credits: 3 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVCC
Prerequisite: 9 credits in LGBT courses.
Restriction: Permission of LGBT Studies Program.
Supervised internship experience with a community organization that expressly serves lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people. Students will be expected to relate course material to experience in an analysis of an organization's activities.
Contact department for information to register for this course.
LING
Linguistics Department Site
LING320
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in LING200.
Recommended: LING240.
Additional information: This course counts as a core course for the linguistics major. Only one of Ling320 or HESP403 can be used to count towards the Linguistics major.
Representations and models of acoustic and articulatory phonetics. Develops concepts and skills for description, measurement and scientific analysis of the sound systems of human languages, including various varieties of English.
MLAW
MPower Undergraduate Law Programs
MLAW304
Introduction to Law and Social Inquiry
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must be in the Law and Society (MLAW) minor.
An exploration of the relationship between law and society from an interdisciplinary perspective. Major themes cover the impact of law on society, society on law and social change.
MUED
Music Education Department Site
MUED420
(Perm Req)
Teaching Secondary Instrumental Music II
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: MUED320 and MUED311.
Restriction: Must be in Music Education program.
Prepare instrumental-emphasis music education majors to synthesize the knowledge and skills that will enable them to develop and/or maintain an exemplary, curricular-oriented, research-based, comprehensive secondary instrumental program.
MUSC
School of Music Department Site
MUSC140
Music Fundamentals I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must not be in any of the following programs (Music (Professional Program); Music Education).
Introductory theory course. Notation, scales, intervals, triads, rhythm, form and basic aural skills.
MUSC448E
Financial Entrepreneurship for Arts Leaders
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Cross-listed with: ARHU340.
Credit only granted for: ARHU340 or MUSC448E.
An introduction to financial entrepreneurship for the arts leader in order to prepare students for diverse and ever-changing careers in the arts and creative fields. Topics explored will include Professional Paperwork (resumes, cover letters, biographies, job searches), Financial Literacy (taxes, budgets, boards, tickets sales, musicians unions), Marketing (website development, social media, press packets, record labels vs. online distribution, headshots, audience development, community engagement, branded content), Communication (public speaking, writing), and Technology (online tools, computer software, peripherals, recording, photography/videography, on campus resources).