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Courses - Fall 2021
AGST
Agricultural Science and Technology
AGST130
Did Yeast Create Civilization?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Recommended: CHEM103, CHEM131, CHEM135, or CHEM146.
Cross-listed with: PLSC130.
Credit only granted for: AGST130 or PLSC130.
Fermented foods have played a major role in the transition from nomadic to settled agrarian societies, the establishment of social and religious customs, the expansion of empires, and modern economies. To what extent are our past and current attitudes towards fermented foods rooted in historical and cultural imprints? Explore the central role of fermentation in human history and culture, the basic microbiological processes underlying fermentation processes, and the processes used to produce and distribute fermented foods. Find out how the fruits, grains, and dairy products used to produce fermented foods are grown and selected. Students will learn about the development and modern use of fermented dairy products, pickles, bread, tea, chocolate, wine, beer, distilled liquors, and pharmaceutical/manufactured products.
There will be 5 required live synchronous meetings via Zoom througout the semester. Please see instructor for details.

There will be a required live/synchronous meeting on the first week of classes via Zoom on Monday, 8/30/2021 at 5pm. If there is a time change to the meeting time, this will be communicated via ELMS.
ANSC
Animal Science
ANSC227
Eating with Eyes Wide Open
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Students will investigate the tension that is created by trade-offs that, knowingly or not, are made by consumers relative to agricultural production methods and dietary choices. Course will inform students about their food supply so they can make informed decisions and practice intentional or informed eating.
ANTH
Anthropology Department Site
ANTH264
Immigration Policy, Immigrant Lives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: IMMR219C.
Credit only granted for: ANTH264 or IMMR219C.
An examination of the phenomenon of international migration, or immigration. Students develop awareness of how immigration has been framed in the general public and examined by social science disciplines, most prominently anthropology. Examination of case studies of different immigrant groups in distinct geographic contexts will illuminate the varied incorporation experiences of immigrants into U.S. society.
Cross-listed with IMMR219C. Credit granted for ANTH264 or IMMR219C.
ANTH265
Anthropology of Global Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
An overview of the growing field of global health including health care systems, medical practices, ideas about illness in cross-cultural contexts, issues of health development, global health inequity, and human rights issues. The course will focus on the history of global health, the critique of major international health agencies and their development paradigms, and the political economy of social inequalities and health.
ANTH266
Changing Climate, Changing Cultures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Explore past, present, and future interactions between humans and climate. Discussions, methods-oriented activities, and case study analyses provide students a foundation for appreciating the role of anthropology in understanding, responding to, and preparing for climate change.
ANTH323
Plagues, Pathogens and Public Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ANTH429A or ANTH323.
Formerly: ANTH429A.
The impact of diseases on populations from prehistoric times through the present will be examined, along with public perceptions of disease, scientific breakthroughs on treatment and prevention, and the ways that politics and public health policies can enhance or impede the advancement of disease treatment. The natural history of disease, population structure, and immunity will be discussed. The class will address emerging and re-emerging diseases and the ways that first responders, researchers, and policy makers may affect the outcome of an outbreak.
AOSC
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science
AOSC123
Causes and Implications of Global Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Cross-listed with GEOL123.
Credit only granted for: AOSC123, GEOG123, GEOL123, or METO123.
Formerly: METO123.
Responsible policy and decision making on issues related to the global environment requires understanding of the basic scientific issues, relationships between the geophysical and biological sciences, the impacts on regional and global endeavors, and the political manner in which humans respond. This course embodies an integrated introduction to the broad scientific and social aspects of the global change problem.
AOSC200
Weather and Climate
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with AOSC201) or DSNS, SCIS
Prerequisite: MATH107, MATH110, or MATH115.
Recommended: Concurrent enrollment in AOSC201.
Formerly: METO200.
Broad survey of the state of knowledge and problems of atmospheric science. Origin and structure of the atmosphere, meteorological observations, weather maps, forecasting, satellites, energetics, wind, general circulation, storms, severe weather, climate change, air pollution.
AOSC200C
Weather and Climate
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with AOSC201) or DSNS, SCIS
Prerequisite: MATH107, MATH110, or MATH115.
Recommended: Concurrent enrollment in AOSC201.
Formerly: METO200.
Broad survey of the state of knowledge and problems of atmospheric science. Origin and structure of the atmosphere, meteorological observations, weather maps, forecasting, satellites, energetics, wind, general circulation, storms, severe weather, climate change, air pollution.
ARCH
Architecture Department Site
ARCH270
Design in Practice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Case studies and hands-on design projects ranging in scale from a product to a building to give students insight into the process by which architects work both individually and collaboratively to put disciplinary knowledge and expertise into practice to shape our built environment.

A Fearless Ideas Course from the Academy for Innovation & Entrepreneurship (AIE): http://ter.ps/iamFEARLESS Click here for more information on the Fearless Ideas Courses.
AREC
Agricultural and Resource Economics Department Site
AREC200
The Chesapeake Bay Ecosystem: Intersection of Science, Economics, and Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS or DSSP, SCIS
The Chesapeake Bay is one of the most studied and monitored ecosystems in the world. To develop effective policies to restore this system to a healthier status requires integrating what we know about the biological and physical properties of the system with our understanding of the human dimension. Issues such as achieving nutrient reduction goals, restoring healthy blue crab and oyster fisheries in the bay will be used to demonstrate how economics interacts with science to guide policies that can be effective in achieving Bay restoration goals.
AREC260
The Science of Gender in Economics and Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Recommended: Completion of introductory statistics recommended but not required.
Describes the process by which various scientific disciplines, including anthropology, evolutionary biology, psychology and economics do research on the topic of gender. We will examine the current state of the literature on the reason why different sexes exist and how sex translates into gender across different societies today. With a better understand of the source of gender, we will examine how researchers are learning about the reasons behind the highly divergent economic outcomes for men and women today. The class will discuss these issues in the context of the labor market in developed countries like the US (why are there fewer women in high paying STEM jobs?, for example) and in the context of a wide variety of markets in developing countries (what role do women play in agriculture, health and politics?, for example). A particular focus of the class will be on techniques for learning more about the underlying reasons for these differences, how they can be overcome and whether women play a special role in improving economic outcomes in the poorest parts of the world.
ARTH
Art History & Archaeology Department Site
ARTH260
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Can art effect social change? How may we use the history of radical and avant-garde art to inform present-day movements and models of artistic and creative activism? This course explores the modern and contemporary history of political art and arts activism on local, national, and global scales.
ARTH260C
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Can art effect social change? How may we use the history of radical and avant-garde art to inform present-day movements and models of artistic and creative activism? This course explores the modern and contemporary history of political art and arts activism on local, national, and global scales.
Restricted to students in Carillon Communities.
ARTH261
Monuments, Monumentality, and the Art of Memorial
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Adopts a chronological approach to the study of, and intersections between, art and society in ancient, medieval, modern, and postmodern Africa, Europe, and America. We begin with the art of ancient Egypt (roughly 3000 BCE) and end with developments after 9/11. We emphasize the historical, religious, political, social, and cultural contexts of the works studied; the relationships of the works to the society that created them; and the interrelationships of these societies and their cultural values as seen through their material and visual culture.
ASTR
Astronomy Department Site
ASTR220
Collisions in Space - The Threat of Asteroid Impacts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in Astronomy program.
Additional information: Course is open to Astronomy and Planetary Sciences minors.
Appropriate for non-science majors. Worried? Can't sleep? Collisions in Space will evaluate the threat of asteroid impacts with the Earth using knowledge of asteroid characteristics and orbits. The merits of possible defense plans will be discussed, as well as the budgetary and political concerns associated with implementing any such plan.
ASTR230
The Science and Fiction of Planetary Systems
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Prerequisite: Must have math eligibility of MATH115 or higher; or MATH113.
Have you ever wondered if humans will ever terraform Mars or Europa so we could live there without a spacesuit? Has it ever crossed your mind how lucky you are that you live on a water-rich planet with an oxygen-rich atmosphere? Have you ever suspected novelists and scriptwriters of creating ridiculous planets that violate scientific laws? Does the fate of our planet's thin biosphere keep you up at night? How common is life in the Universe? These are difficult questions, but armed with the right information, you can answer all of them. The Science and Fiction of Planetary Systems will help you develop a deeper understanding of why planets are the way they are. Along the way, you'll see examples of mistakes made in classic science fiction movies, novels and short stories and get the chance to invent your own plausible planets!
BMGT
Business and Management Department Site
BMGT207
Technology, Society and the Future of Humanity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
New emerging and converging technologies (such as blockchain, AI, and synthetic biology) are disrupting business-as-usual in fields as diverse as finance, supply chain, medicine and the creative industries. This course deals with the question of how we should use technology to create ethical economic and social systems that reflect the kind of world we want to exist in 25, 50, 100 years from now. Our ideas of what humanity considers to be a "good life" will influence and govern how disruptive technologies can either contribute to it or lead to a dystrophic future.
BMGT289A
Social Enterprise: Changing the World through Innovation and Transformative Action
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
In this course, students will hear from real-life social entrepreneurs, explore current day social issues of sustainability, climate change, leadership, disruptive innovations, and create or blueprint business plans to generate positive social change. This class will focus on innovative thinking skills, personal narratives, and social interaction strategies and plans.
BMGT289B
How Do Innovators Think?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
In this course, students will learn about: a) the innovation process and the role of the individual in generating innovations and b) the attributes, habits, and skills of individuals who have successfully started innovative new businesses or significantly added value to an existing company.
Credit will be granted for only one of the following: BMGT289B or HONR289P.
BMGT289D
Frauds, Scams, and Thefts: What, How and Why?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
The primary objective of this course is for students to gain a conceptual understanding of how fraud occurs, how it can be prevented, and how fraud can be detected through practical application of skills and tools. This course provides general background relating to fraud (e.g. history, prevalence, psychology), and it delves into the myriad types of fraud, scams and theft. This course also examines the trends in fraud detection and investigation; and introduces and explores with students the constant tension between public order and civil liberties in white collar crime, forensics, and hacking.
BMGT289E
Entrepreneurial Thinking for Non-Business Majors: How Not to Miss Great Opportunities Your Life Throws at You
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
In this course, students learn how to analyze the world around them and then notice and define new trends, emerging problems, impending gaps, and how to turn these into exciting opportunities by providing creative solutions. Students will have a chance to not only sharpen their critical thinking skills, but also learn how to take initiative, develop a working solution, identify and resolve conflicts, and be confident and persistent, yet flexible enough to respond to changes. Student teams identify a compelling problem in present day life and then propose a creative solution taking into account possible difficulties in implementation. In addition, students will also be given problems on a much smaller scale and asked to create and present a workable solution. Students will be exposed to how a visionary's mind works and the creative solution process. In addition, students will also learn how entrepreneurial thinking can improve their day-to-day life.
BMGT289I
Why Good Managers Make Bad Decisions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
This course provides an overview of the concepts, approaches, and vocabulary of evidence-based management (EBM) and provides an understanding of how experts in many disciplines can employ evidenced based decision making. EBM is an emerging movement in business to explicitly use the current best information in management decision making with special emphasis on relevant scientific findings and unbiased organizational facts. The course stresses how individuals practicing EBM learn how to rethink their approaches to data and knowledge in order to make more effective decisions.
Why do smart managers make flawed decisions? Why do managers keep believing they have made the right choice, even with disastrous results staring them in the face? Why Good Managers Make Bad Decisions will address how evidence-based management and other decisionmaking tools can be used to uncover hidden assumptions in the corner offices of great corporations.
BMGT289J
Exploring Leadership: Are Hidden Forces at Work?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Addresses key dimensions of leadership behavior: personal integrity, self-awareness, vision, emotional intelligence, personality, communication, organizational competence, and empowering people and teams. The course invites students on a journey of professional exploration, understanding and development--with the explicit goal of enabling students to embark on a path of personal leadership development. To achieve this goal, the course offers an extensive examination of leadership in organizations and provides students with a set of experiences that are designed to enhance their self-awareness and capacity for effective leadership. Opportunities are provided through assessments, simulations, group exercises, discussion, case studies and readings to develop leadership skills and the capability to motivate, collaborate, negotiate, manage group dynamics, and communicate effectively. Through the academic study of leadership, self-assessments, practice and reflection, students learn the strengths and limitations of their own leadership style that will assist them in becoming a more effective leader.
BSCI
Biological Sciences Program Department Site
BSCI126
Pollinators in Crisis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
We will dissect the pollinator crisis, and in the process learn about insects, about the interaction of organisms in complex ecosystems, and about the human-nature interface. Students will work in groups that specialize in an aspect of pollinator biology and their challenges. Instruction will target methods for collecting information, interpretation of scientific information and the professional presentation of findings.
(Sponsoring Dept.: ENTM). Not acceptable for credit for any Biological Sciences major.
BSCI135
Amazing Green: Plants that Transformed the World
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, SCIS
An interactive way to learn about plants and science, focusing on how plants have changed human history, the biology of their growth, and the science behind their use.
(Sponsoring Dept.: CBMG). Students must pay a $40.00 laboratory materials fee. Not acceptable for credit for any Biological Sciences major.
BSCI150
Beyond Race: Human Biological Diversity
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL or DSSP, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: BSCI189I or BSCI150.
Formerly: BSCI189I.
Provides the scientific evidence for rejecting race as a biological concept. The course covers basic biology, human evolution, human phylogenetics, and a critique of race as an explanation of human traits.
BSCI223
General Microbiology
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, SCIS
Prerequisite: BSCI170 and BSCI171; or BSCI105.
Fundamental concepts in morphology, physiology, genetics, immunology, ecology, and pathogenic microbiology. Applications of microbiology to medicine, the food industry and biotechnology.
(Sponsoring Dept.: CBMG). Students must pay a $40.00 laboratory materials fee.
BSCI283
Principles of Microbiology
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, SCIS
Prerequisite: BSCI207 and BSCI222.
Credit only granted for: BSCI223 or BSCI283.
Additional information: Priority given to BSCI, BCHM and CHEM majors.
Introduction to microorganisms designed for science majors. Genetic principles underlying microbial abilities; microbial structure-function relationships; metabolism, physiology, and ecology of microorganisms; interactions between microorganisms (including pathogens) and their hosts.
(Sponsoring Dept.: CBMG).
BSGC
Global Communities
BSGC101
(Perm Req)
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must be in Global Communities Living-Learning program.
An interdisciplinary exploration of the historical evolution and contemporary significance of growing interconnectedness in the world. We debate different perspectives on globalization and its impact on social, political, economic and cultural issues.
BSOS
Behavioral and Social Sciences
BSOS201
Ensuring your Financial Future Through Stock Investing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: BSOS289I or BSOS201.
Formerly: BSOS289I.
Additional information: No prior knowledge of the stock market or investing is expected or required.
Introduces students to investing and trading, with special emphasis on the field of technical analysis. Planning for one's financial future is a critical skill for all students. Students will learn how to evaluate companies using the investors.com website and the TC2000 stock charting program. Students will develop an idea of the risks and benefits of investing, establishing a savings strategy, opening an IRA, and strategically planning for future financial security. In addition to readings, lectures, and online videos, students will participate in virtual stock market trading exercises and manage a virtual account.
BSST
Terrorism Studies
BSST334
States of Emergency
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Students will explore the manner in which crises unfold from the perspective of a variety of emergency response disciplines, including: emergency management, law enforcement, intelligence analysis, cyber analysis, risk communication, health and human services, and emergency psychiatry/psychology. Students will participate in a semester-long simulation of an unfolding terrorist attack.
CCJS
Criminology and Criminal Justice Department Site
CCJS225
Responses to Violence
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
Conflict is unfortunately resolved through violence in a number of settings. It ranges from interpersonal to international in its scope. This course investigates the strengths and weakness of a number of resolutions to reducing violence over the course of history using both state centered and informal control.
CCJS325
Slavery in the Twenty First Century: Combating Human Trafficking
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: CCJS325 or CCJS498R.
Formerly: CCJS498R.
The trafficking of human beings in its historical, legal, economic, political and social contexts. Scope of the global problem, different forms of human trafficking, and regional trends and practices. Roles of government, the international community and individual actors. Strategies to combat trafficking.
CHSE
Counseling, Higher Education, and Special Education
CHSE205
Disability: From Stigma and Sideshow to Mainstream and Main Street
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: EDSP289I or CHSE205.
Formerly: EDSP289I.
Explores the cultural, historical, educational, and medical roots of difference among human beings and examines the impact of cultural and technological changes on individuals traditionally identified as disabled. The course is designed to develop a broad understanding of the concept of "disability" and the emerging technologies that shape contemporary understanding of this phenomenon and the lives of those considered disabled.
CLAS
Classics Department Site
CLAS275
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Additional information: All readings will be done in English translation.
An introduction to the breadth and complexity of humor's role in society. Students will explore ancient Greek and Roman comedies side-by-side with contemporary sitcoms and movies, to learn the explanations that various disciplines have offered about why we laugh, and to understand the major impact humor has in how we see ourselves and our world.
CPMS
College Park Scholars-Media, Self and Society
CPMS225
Analyzing Media Practice through Theory
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Prerequisite: CPMS100.
Restriction: Must be in the Scholars Media, Self & Society Program.
Formerly: CPSP222.
Media analysis investigating patterns of ownership, the working of media organizations, patterns of coverage and the nature of audiences.
CPSS
College Park Scholars-Science, Technology and Society
CPSS225
College Park Scholars Capstone: Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Prerequisite: CPSS100.
Restriction: Must be in the College Park Scholars Science, Technology & Society (CPSS) program.
Formerly: CPSP227.
Exploration and understanding of ways science and technology shape and are shaped by society.
CPSS240
College Park Scholars: Science, Technology & Society - Service-Learning Practicum
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Restriction: Matriculation into the College Park Scholars Science, Technology & Society (CPSS) program; or permission of instructor.
Supervised Service-Learning practicum in issues related to science, technology and society.
Most of the class times will be spent at area Prince George's schools with partnering robotics teams. Consult the class requirements and locations provided in the syllabus at the beginning of the class.

This course requires a $61 background check fee for working in Prince Georges County K-12 schools.
ECON
Economics Department Site
ECON111
Thinking Like an Economist
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Sophomore standing or lower; or permission of BSOS-Economics department.
An introduction to the modes of thought of economics. Use of simple standard tools of economics to analyze important problems that arise frequently in public policy, the news media, and in daily life. An emphasis on how economists predict what choices societies make and how economists analyze whether those are good choices. Practical application of a variety of economic tools leading to a focus on the essential unity underlying these analytical tools, viewing economics as a discipline that applies a core methodology in different ways in different situations.
ECON175
Inequality: Determinants and Policy Remedies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
History shows that the gap between the rich and the poor has varied over time within and between countries, most recently seeming to increase within many countries while somewhat decreasing between countries. This course challenges students to investigate why people make different amounts of money, why income inequality has changed dramatically in recent years, what public policy tools exist to counter inequality increases, and what different institutional arrangements different countries use to lower inequality. This course will introduce students to theoretical tools used by economists to understand the sources of inequality and will also examine various empirical measures of inequality.
ECON181
Putting a Price on the Environment: An Economist's Perspective on Sustainability
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
How does society balance the benefits of environmental protection and preservation against the costs? Though some might say that the environment is priceless, economists recognize that every action involves trade-offs. This course investigates sustainability through comparing costs and benefits. From this perspective, other questions arise: How can we design policies that incentivize sustainable choices? Why might usual market functioning fail to achieve sustainability? Do we need to put a price on the environment in order to protect it? How do we measure an economy's "success"? This course explores the answers to these and other related questions from an economist's perspective.
EDHD
Education, Human Development Department Site
EDHD310
Your Brain on Education: The Neuroscience of Learning and Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Prerequisite: PSYC100.
Investigation linking research in the brain science of learning and development, including the neural basis of academic skills, to achievement, disability, and broader applications to classroom learning. This course will focus on areas of education including language (spoken and written), conceptual change, numerical/quantitative processing, and social cognition as well as burgeoning areas of neuroscientific research in general cognitive processes such as attention, memory, and executive processing. These topics will be discussed with respect to typical and atypical development with some focus on developmental disabilities including autism, specific language impairment, reading and math impairment, and attention deficit disorders among others. This course will focus on both the theoretical perspectives and pragmatic issues of how evidence regarding brain development can or may be translated into useful or misleading information for educators, professionals, and parents/guardians of our children.
ENCE
Engineering, Civil Department Site
ENCE204
How Do Cities Work
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Can we improve the way cities work? Are we equitably sharing the benefits and the burdens of living in a city? This course examines how cities work, and importantly, whether they work the same for everyone living in the city. We will explore the ways in which we provide city services and who is included or excluded from these services. We will examine how the city infrastructure serves a neighborhood's residents, with an eye toward how community forms. We will use first person accounts from policymakers, advocates, and community members to learn about the planning process for services and the tensions that can exist around access to healthcare, food and affordable housing. Each week we will study a new facet of the city, drawing on the writings of experts and your own journey through the city to better understand its infrastructure, asking how does it work, how does it connect to other infrastructure and whom does it primarily serve?
Restricted to students in Carillon Communities.
ENEE
Electrical & Computer Engineering Department Site
ENEE200
Technology and Consequences: Engineering, Ethics, and Humanity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
What makes a technology socially responsible? At UMD, the Fearless Ideas campaign asks us to aim our enthusiasm for technology at big real problems. At the same time, we are coming to appreciate the increasingly complex nature of technological systems as they become integrated into all forms of infrastructure, we realize they may be unpredictable, interdependent on social and biological systems, and have unintended consequences. In this midst of this complexity, people make decisions with far reaching impacts. How then do we follow our passion for technology and innovation but also stay skeptical in a way that allows us to consider the potential and shortcomings of technology? Designed for both engineering and non-engineering students wishing to explore and assess the impact of engineering technology on society and the role of society in generating that technology.
Electrical Engineering (09090) and Computer Engineering(09991) majors have priority. Non-majors should choose the holdfile option. Department will release available seats to students in the holdfile after May 6, 2021.
ENES
Engineering Science
ENES210
Entrepreneurial Opportunity Analysis and Decision-Making in 21st Century Technology Ventures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENES210 or ENES461.
This multi-disciplinary course helps students learn the principles of entrepreneurial opportunity analysis and decision-making in an increasingly dynamic and technically-inclined society. Emphasis is placed on how aspiring technology entrepreneurs can develop their entrepreneurial perspectives to develop winning entrepreneurial plans for their future ventures.
ENGL
English Department Site
ENGL130
Race and the Cultural Politics of Blood: A Historical Perspective
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Exploration of race, as term and concept, at three different historical times and from three different perspectives, through the reading of three stories: William Shakespeare's drama Othello, Aphra Behn's novella Oroonoko, and the short story Benito Cereno by Herman Melville. Exploration of the importance of context in interpretation. Study of how a concept for rationalizing human difference appears and adapts, fuses and fades away, relocates and is repurposed. How understanding of the particular situation of the concept, its context, changes our reading of the story.
ENGL140
American Fictions: U.S. Literature, History, Politics, and Constitutional Law
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Works of American literature explored in the context of major texts and developments of U.S. history, culture, politics, and constitutional law. We begin with the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution, and survey the course of American literature and history, from 1776 to the present, in relation to defining political and constitutional issues. Readings of canonical works like "Huckleberry Finn" and "The Grapes of Wrath" coupled with special attention to minority authors and issues, and horizons of constitutional contemplation opened up by minority, immigrant, and women's voices and experiences. Key historical and political issues include human rights; equal protection; religious tolerance; democratic principles; republican structures of government; independence; revolution; slavery; removal; immigration; free speech; labor rights; civil rights; feminism; environmentalism; international law and flows of people; economic globalization; technology and digital innovation; and the role that literature and the humanities play in fostering various forms of civil society, multiculturalism, and a globally accountable citizenship.
ENGL143
Visualizing Knowledge: From Data to Images
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Explores how technology and people shape our current age of information through the various forms of visually representing information. Visualizations do not show us things that are evident--visualizations make things evident. We will thus examine the history of visualization practices, the theories of image-making that guide their production, and the current state of the art. Students will engage critically with a wide range of information visualization practices to gain an understanding of the work involved in producing them and their histories. Students will also seek out contemporary visualizations, interact with the practitioners who produce them, and produce their own visualization as a response or critique.
ENGL143C
Visualizing Knowledge: From Data to Images
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Explores how technology and people shape our current age of information through the various forms of visually representing information. Visualizations do not show us things that are evident--visualizations make things evident. We will thus examine the history of visualization practices, the theories of image-making that guide their production, and the current state of the art. Students will engage critically with a wide range of information visualization practices to gain an understanding of the work involved in producing them and their histories. Students will also seek out contemporary visualizations, interact with the practitioners who produce them, and produce their own visualization as a response or critique.
Restricted to students in Carillon Communities.
ENMA
Engineering, Materials Department Site
ENMA150
Materials of Civilization
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
The discovery of new materials has shaped history and built civilizations. The utilization, properties and production techniques of materials from the Bronze Age up through modern times and into the future will be traced. These materials are explained by considering their atomic structure, the binding forces between atoms and their arrangement, and how controlling the structure controls the materials properties.
FMSC
Family Science Department Site
FMSC170
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: FMSC170 or FMSC298F.
Formerly: FMSC298F.
Examination of current trends and controversial issues in family life, including issues of marriage, reproductive technologies, adoption, child custody, remarriage, and marital violence.
FMSC190
Man Up! Where Are The Fathers?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
An examination of changing fatherhood roles, health, and inequality in diverse families. Focus will be on masculinities and disparities among men by race and class; provider role expectations; and trauma and violence faced by men in contemporary society.
GEOG
Geographical Sciences Department Site
GEOG140
Natural Disasters: Earthquakes, Floods, and Fires
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Catastrophic Environmental Events (CCE) that are becoming more common in this time of global environmental change and it is essential that today's students be equipped with the knowledge and skills to be leaders as we, as a society, understand the upheaval that these CCEs are causing. Students will examine how CEEs shape human society and ecosystem from the interdisciplinary perspective afforded by the field of Geography. Students will use the latest geographic science concepts and techniques in exploring these events. Using satellite imagery they will gain a multi-scale perspective of the ecological and societal aspects of the events.
GEOG330
As the World Turns: Society and Sustainability in a Time of Great Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: GEOG330, GEOG360, or GEOG362.
Formerly: GEOG362.
Cultural geography course on society and sustainability. Culture is the basic building block that is key to sustainability of societies. Course will cover sustainability of societies on different scales, examining local, regional, and worldwide issues. Sustainability will be examined as a key element of environmental sustainability. How societies adjust to rapid world change will be examined as a positive and/or negative factor in sustainability.
GEOL
Geology Department Site
GEOL123
Causes and Consequences of Global Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Cross-listed with AOSC123.
Credit only granted for: AOSC123, GEOG123, GEOL123, or METO123.
Study of the major components of Earth's climate system and climate change history. Discussion of 21st century climate change prediction, mitigation and adaptation efforts.
GEOL124
Evolution of Life and Environment on Planet Earth
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
An exploration of how life has shaped Earth's physical environments, both in the contemporary Earth and over the long course of Earth history. Topics range from evidence for the origin and diversification of life and its impact on Earth environments to the mind-set and methods of the scientists who interpret it, and what those methods tell us about future interactions between life and the environment, both on Earth and in the Solar System.
Restricted to students in Carillon Communities.
GEOL200
Earth's Fury: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Tsunami
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunami frequently remind us of the dangers associated with living on a constantly changing planet. How do people prepare for these rare but dramatic events? Student will study the science behind earthquakes and volcanoes, how it guides monitoring, forecasting, prevention, and response, and the cultural and ethical aspects of these events.
GVPT
Government and Politics Department Site
GVPT202
Politics, Constitutional Policy, and the Institution of the U.S. Supreme Court
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
A thorough examination of the U.S. Supreme Court in the American political system. Focusing on the Court as an institution-the set of norms, rules, and policymaking processes that lead to the Supreme Court's decisions-and how justices' decision-making processes critically determine substantive legal policy and the meaning of the U.S. Constitution.
GVPT204
Uncertain Partners: US and China in a Changing World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: GVPT204 or GVPT289J.
Formerly: GVPT289J.
The rapid ascent of the People's Republic of China (PRC) as a major political and economic power has meant that its relationship with the United States has become central in contemporary international politics. To an increasing extent, some of the biggest global challenges--ranging from nuclear proliferation, to climate change, to economic growth--require U.S.-China cooperation if they are to be managed effectively. Yet the U.S.-China relationship is at times turbulent, and its future remains highly uncertain. Will the U.S. and China be able to forge a closer partnership that will enable them to cooperate in dealing with some of the vexing challenges facing the international community? Or are they more likely to drift toward a more adversarial relationship, as China's growing power--and the US reaction--generate a vicious cycle of mutual mistrust? In this class, students will grapple with these questions as they learn about the history of U.S.-China relations, and about many of the current issues facing the relationship.
HACS
ACES-Cybersecurity
HACS208P
Seminar in Cybersecurity; Beyond Technology, the Policy Implications of Cyberspace
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living Learning Program.
HESI
Higher Ed, Student Affairs, and International Ed Policy
HESI202
Race and Diversity in Higher Education
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Will discuss contemporary and controversial issues on race and diversity in higher education. Addresses the question: How should race influence college admissions and campus climate? Will expose students to different viewpoints on the role of race in higher education settings.
HESP
Hearing and Speech Sciences Department Site
HESP214
The Research Behind Headlines on Words, Thought, and Behavior
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HNUH278A.
Credit only granted for: HNUH278A or HESP214.
How does the human mind use language? Type "Language Science News" into your Google search bar. Among the more than 3 billion hits, headlines like "What is love? It depends what language you speak" and "Science's English dominance hinders diversity" invite you to think about the impact of words on thought and behavior. These are stories about how humans acquire and use language, but they ultimately address big questions about how we experience knowledge itself. In a world of unprecedented access to science journalism, did you ever read a headline about human behavior and wonder: How do we know? This class takes up the elegant ways cognitive scientists design experiments to answer crucial questions about language and thought, brain and behavior, that have no intuitive answers. Students will dive deep into the media coverage of their favorite claims about what we know, debate the psychological science behind these claims, and develop transferable critical-thinking skills in the process.
HIST
History Department Site
HIST132
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
An examination of the different tools and tactics, means and methods that Americans have used to escape slavery or try to eliminate it.
HIST133
God Wills It! The Crusades in Medieval and Modern Perspectives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Cross-listed with: RELS133.
Credit only granted for: HIST133, RELS133 or RELS289D.
Formerly: RELS289D.
An examination of the identities and convictions both of the Western Europeans who participated in the Crusades and of the Easterners (Muslim, Christian, and Jewish) whom they encountered in the Holy Land. Focuses on the era of the first four great Crusades, from about 1095 to 1215. Consideration of the cultural impact of these movements on both Western Europe and the Middle East.
HIST134
Spies, Assassins, Martyrs, and Witches: Famous Trials in American History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Examination of some of the most famous trials in American history and their enduring hold on the imagination.
HIST134S
Spies, Assassins, Martyrs, and Witches: Famous Trials in American History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Examination of some of the most famous trials in American history and their enduring hold on the imagination.
HIST135
Civil Discourse or Urban Riot: Why Cities Don't (Often) Explode
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: JWST289E.
Credit only granted for: HIST135 or JWST289E.
An examination of the mechanisms that promote peaceful co-existence in urban societies and a discussion of how and why city streets sometimes become violent.
Jointly offered with JWST289E. Credit granted for HIST135 or JWST289E.
HIST136
Moneyland: Business in American Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
An exploration of American business culture and institutions from colonial times to the present with emphasis on how inherited and acquired identities (social capital) have shaped Americans' experiences as entrepreneurs, managers, workers, and consumers.
HIST187
God, Land, Power, and the People: Moral Issues in the Jewish Historical Experience
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: JWST187.
Credit only granted for: HIST187 or JWST187.
Examines the complicated relationship between theology, nationalism, sovereignty, and the ethical exercise of social control using case studies drawn from the Jewish historical experience. The universal and age-old issues implicit in the exercise of power have gained special moral force for Jews with the creation of the State of Israel, a Jewish and a democratic state with substantial non-Jewish minorities and hundreds of thousands of non-citizen subjects. Can these be reconciled? Jewish efforts over the ages and in recent times to define justice provide concrete examples through which to examine and discuss crucial abstract principles.
HIST289O
Lawlessness: From Pirates to Body-snatchers, Exploring the Legitimacy of Illicit Activity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Explores motives of and responses to the lawless behavior of pirates, body snatchers, bandits, vigilantes, smugglers and others worldwide from the 1500s to today.
HLTH
HLTH234
Global Health Messages: Understanding Exposure & Impact
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in the Community Health program.
Using a global perspective, this course teaches students to be critical consumers of current and historical health communication interventions. It also provides students with the skills to develop media interventions that target specific and general populations. Students will discover the array of diverse media messages that influence the health and well-being of individuals and communities.
HLTH234H
(Perm Req)
Global Health Messages: Understanding Exposure & Impact
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in the Community Health program.
Using a global perspective, this course teaches students to be critical consumers of current and historical health communication interventions. It also provides students with the skills to develop media interventions that target specific and general populations. Students will discover the array of diverse media messages that influence the health and well-being of individuals and communities.
HLTH264
Tweets & Likes: Digital Health & Social Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in the Community Health program.
Examines the current and potential use of digital health and social media to influence public health. Provides an overview of knowledge, skills and terminology necessary to optimize the effectiveness of these technologies to contribute to the enhancement of individual and community health.
Restricted to non-community health majors.
HLTH264H
(Perm Req)
Tweets & Likes: Digital Health & Social Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in the Community Health program.
Examines the current and potential use of digital health and social media to influence public health. Provides an overview of knowledge, skills and terminology necessary to optimize the effectiveness of these technologies to contribute to the enhancement of individual and community health.
HNUH
University Honors
HNUH218A
Pursuits of Happiness: Ordinary Lives in the American Revolution
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: HNUH218A or HIST137.
Dedicated to telling the stories of ordinary people in the American Revolution, to recovering the voices and experiences of all the founders of this country whose lives and contributions have been obscured by our tendency to worship a dozen or so well-to-do and well-educated men in suits as if they alone conceived and executed the American Revolution and the founding of the United States. So we'll be talking this semester about the marginalized, the downtrodden, the rank and file, the rabble - all the people who never make it onto monuments or money. The point of this is to allow us all to recognize the fundamental fact that fighting a Revolution is a collective act that requires a genuine mass movement. Declaring independence on a piece of parchment on a summer's day in Philadelphia in 1776 doesn't mean anything unless tens of thousands of people are willing to support that cause and fight to make it a reality. To revolt, then, is not an individual act - it's for crowds, for mobs, and for whole communities to do together. Declaring independence is a fundamentally cooperative act.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is the required I-Series class in the Revolution Cluster. HNUH218A will only be offered in Fall 2021 and in Winter Term (asynchronous, online) in January 2022."
HNUH228A
Peace in our time? Conflict and Conflict Resolution in International Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Is the world getting more peaceful? There are currently civil wars raging in much of the world and millions of people have fled these wars as refugees or internally displaced persons. Terrorist attacks kill thousands, and can occur in any corner of the planet. At the same time many actors use strategies such as peacekeeping, mediation, promotion of human rights and post-conflict justice to resolve conflicts and build peace. In this course, we will examine conflict, peace, and conflict resolution in contemporary international politics. We will interrogate concepts such as peace, conflict, and violence, the different forms that these phenomena can take, and how we can measure their occurrence. We will discuss theoretical explanations for why individuals and groups have disputes and why these actors choose to use violence (or not) in these disputes and examine these arguments in specific cases. We will analyze conflict resolution strategies such as mediation, peacekeeping, and human rights promotion both theoretically and empirically. This discussion will allow students to develop an argument for whether the world is getting more peaceful, why it is or is not, and what this could mean about the future of violence and peace.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the 'War & Peace' cluster; War & Peace courses will be offered through Spring 2022.
HNUH238A
Deliberative Democracy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
How do we change our politics, save democracy, and move beyond the "us vs. them" culture that divides us? This course begins with the premise that how we talk to one another and debate controversial issues can promote the public good or erode it in irreparable ways. Students in each class session will put principles of public dialogue into practice as they learn deliberative theories and skills that can help save democracy. Class readings will turn to historical case studies to frame the most controversial political issues we face today.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the 'Deliberation' cluster; Deliberation courses will be offered through Spring 2022.
HNUH248A
Identity, Places, & Spaces
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Students in this interdisciplinary course will explore multi-layered issues related to privilege and oppression through their own life experiences via exposure to theory, research, film, memoirs, and current events. Students will evaluate and critique common assumptions about the meaning and experiences of privilege and oppression using Intersectionality theory as a guiding framework. The human experience related to various social identities (i.e., race, gender and gender identity, sexual orientation, social class, religion, age, and ability) will be addressed.
Restricted to UH students whomatriculated in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the 'Identity & Intersectionality' cluster; Identity & Intersectionality courses will be offered through Spring 2022.
HNUH258A
Harvesting Big Data to Examine Agriculture and Climate Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Can agricultural production keep up with climate change? Data analytics and data science are driving the force behind the digital revolution, which has changed the way we are able to analyze and interpret the world. The explosion of data offers both opportunities and challenges that require new tools and methods of analysis. This course applies sophisticated digital tools to an age-old concern: the impact of environmental change and extreme weather on agricultural productivity. In this hands-on introduction to data analysis and visualization with real-world data, students acquire the tools to understand the impacts of environmental change and more.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the "Information & Power" thematic cluster. Information & Power courses will be offered through Spring 2023.
HNUH268A
Arbitrating our Bodily Rights: Consent to Sex, Medical Treatment, Body Art, Organ Donation, and Research Participation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Both American law and conventional morality support the view that human beings have bodily rights - ones we can waive by giving another person our consent to do what would otherwise be a rights violation. Yet, debate about the sovereignty of an individual's body and the potential rights of others--including the state--over our bodies lies at the core of some of the most contentious issues facing us as a society. This class will investigate the thorny debates that pertain to consent in sexual relations, medicine and research, and bodily markets. What types threats, offers, or cognitive incapacities undermine true consent? How do we evaluate the moral or legal significance of bodily rights when they come into tension with the government's interest? After evaluating arguments, exploring distinctions, and using philosophical tools to arrive at reasoned conclusions about consent, students will learn to apply these conceptual tools to cases from fiction and current events.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the "Body Politics" thematic cluster. Body Politics courses will be offered through Spring 2023.
HNUH288A
Welcome to the Party: Race, Nightlife, and Identity in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
How does play shape our humanity and national identity? We often define people by the work that they do, whereas we tend to think of leisure and after work playfulness as a release from that identity. This course takes up a particular form of play--nightlife--to reckon with how it shapes what it means to be human and how it impacts nationhood, particularly around matters of race and oppression. Spanning from slavery to the present, this course examines how nightlife has been used to deny black people's humanity and been a vital site of playfulness, manifest as joy, resistance, self-making, and aesthetic innovation. Using performance studies to make sense of the world, our explorations will range from cakewalk dance competitions on plantations to queer night clubs. Once students better understand how nightlife is vital to the making and the unmaking of black people's humanity, they will grapple with play as a meaning-maker in their own lives and in our democracy.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the "Virtually Human" thematic cluster. Virtually Human courses will be offered through Spring 2023.
HONR
HONR268N
Honors Seminar; Cracking the Secrets of the Universe Using Computers: Re-discovering the Higgs and Searching for Invisible Matter
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
HONR269T
Honors Seminar: Understanding U.S. Foreign Policy toward Afghanistan
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
This is a Global Classroom course. There will be approximately 3 to 4 classes where this course will meet on a Saturday or Sunday morning for videoconferencing with students in Kabul, Afghanistan instead of meeting at its normal weekly time on Thursday nights (exact dates and times are TBA).
HONR299F
Honors Seminar; Financial Crises: The Foundation of Global Tension
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
IMMR
Immigration Studies
IMMR219C
Immigration Policy, Immigrant Lives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: ANTH264.
Credit only granted for: ANTH264 or IMMR219C.
An examination of the phenomenon of international migration, or immigration. Students develop awareness of how immigration has been framed in the general public and examined by social science disciplines, most prominently anthropology. Examination of case studies of different immigrant groups in distinct geographic contexts will illuminate the varied incorporation experiences of immigrants into U.S. society.
INAG
Institute of Applied Agriculture Department Site
INAG123
People, Planet, and Profit: Digging Into Sustainable Agriculture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Investigates the principles and practices of sustainable agriculture and their relationship to the greater food system. Explores the social (people), environmental (planet), and economic (profit) impacts of agriculture - from challenges to opportunities. INAG123 applies the principles of sustainability to various agricultural production practices and systems - at a range of different scales - to see what lessons these varied models can offer. Along the way, we will consider domestic issues such as food safety and distribution, food justice, cultural relevance, biodiversity, farming communities, and effects on local economies.
Students will have in person field trips scheduled and must provide their own transportation (actual dates to be determined).
INST
Information Studies
INST154
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Examines Apollo mission, one of the greatest engineering accomplishments of all time, in which Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. Since the mission, people have asked: if we can land on the moon, why can't we eliminate poverty? Why can't we cure cancer? Why can't we prevent global warming? Asks what were the social, political, financial, scientific, engineering, operational, and human aspects of the Apollo program that came together to make the moon landings possible?
INST155
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: INFM289I or INST155.
Formerly: INFM289I.
Introduces methods for analyzing and understanding how people use social media - social networking websites, blogging and microblogging, and other forms of online interaction and content generation - and their societal implications. Introduces students to the science and social science of network analysis. Through real world examples, including analysis of their own social networks, students develop skills for describing and understanding the patterns and usage of services like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and others.
ISRL
Israel Studies
ISRL289I
The Israeli/Palestinian Conflict: Fundamental Questions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
As has become evident this year, the Palestinian-Israeli conflict retains its capacity to mobilize both sides against each other. Why are Palestinian Arabs and Israeli Jews unable to resolve their differences? This course uncovers some of the deeper explanations as to why the conflict persists, even as it changes over the decades.
JOUR
Journalism Department Site
JOUR281
Media Law and Ethics in the Digital Age
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR289E or JOUR281.
Formerly: JOUR289E.
Additional information: This course is intended for non-journalism majors.
Explores the First Amendment, libel, privacy, FOIA and copyright as they have evolved in the digital news age of bloggers, tweeters and citizen journalists. The course will cover fundamental legal and ethical concepts as well as practical application.
JOUR282
Beyond Facebook: How Social Media are Transforming Society, Culture, Business and Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR289F or JOUR282.
Formerly: JOUR289F.
Examining the rise of social media and their impact on culture, business, government, politics, journalism and society, this course provides students with a broad contextual understanding of the multidisciplinary impacts of social media such as Twitter, Facebook and similar Internet-based services.
JOUR283
Probing War: Investigative Narratives and American Conflicts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR283 or JOUR289J.
Formerly: JOUR289J.
Students will explore the realities of war through the work of journalists who pushed beyond the daily headlines, some risking life and limb, to challenge official versions and document uncomfortable realities about American conflicts.
JOUR284
Scandal: Exposing Corruption, Justice, and Vice in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR289P, JOUR284 or HONR239J.
Formerly: JOUR289P, HONR239J.
Students will examine the nature and meaning of scandals in society: how they are uncovered and constructed; why some forms of wrongdoing are considered scandalous but not others; how this definition has changed over time; and how scandals resonate in ways that reflect societal norms.
JWST
Jewish Studies Department Site
JWST171
Is Judaism a Religion?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: RELS171.
Credit only granted for: JWST171 or RELS171.
Jewish identity can be framed in terms of ethnicity, culture, and religious practice, but also in terms of more contemporary social constructions including social action, political engagement, and intellectual pursuit. In the context of such diverse social and individual frames, what does it mean to identify Judaism as a religion? Attention to Jewish society in historical and global perspective will provide a backdrop for a particular focus on contemporary Jews in the United States and Israel.
JWST187
God, Land, Power, and the People: Moral Issues in the Jewish Historical Experience
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HIST187.
Credit only granted for: HIST187 or JWST187.
Examines the complicated relationship between theology, nationalism, sovereignty, and the ethical exercise of social control using case studies drawn from the Jewish historical experience. The universal and age-old issues implicit in the exercise of power have gained special moral force for Jews with the creation of the State of Israel, a Jewish and a democratic state with substantial non-Jewish minorities and hundreds of thousands of non-citizen subjects. Can these be reconciled? Jewish efforts over the ages and in recent times to define justice provide concrete examples through which to examine and discuss crucial abstract principles.
JWST274
Jerusalem in Antiquity: The History of Sacred Space in a Holy City
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: RELS274.
Credit only granted for: JWST274, RELS274, JWST289J or RELS289J.
Formerly: JWST289J, RELS289J.
Examines the complex history of Jerusalem's status as a holy city, with a focus on constructions of sacred space in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
JWST289E
Civil Discourse or Urban Riot: Why Cities Don't (Often) Explode
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HIST135.
Credit only granted for: HIST135 or JWST289E.
An examination of the mechanisms that promote peaceful co-existence in urban societies and a discussion of how and why city streets sometimes become violent.
KNES
Kinesiology Department Site
KNES225
Hoop Dreams: Black Masculinity and Sport
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: KNES289R OR KNES225.
Formerly: KNES289R.
Has sport disadvantaged African American males? This course critically examines sport as a site where notions of black masculinity are publicly debated, critiqued, challenged, celebrated, and also transformed. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores how sport has been invoked across the political and ideological spectrum to interrogate a number of issues impacting the life chances of young, African Americans males including educational attainment, poverty, social mobility, racism, cultural production, and notions of masculinity.
KNES226
The Cybernetic Human
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: KNES289W OR KNES226.
Formerly: KNES289W.
Can the profound and rapid technological advances experienced in the 21st century change what it means to be human or the nature of humanity? Emergent technologies, new materials, increased computer power, engineering innovations, and groundbreaking work in the sciences of cognition and action provide myriad opportunities for repairing and enhancing the human body and brain. Examines the ethical, social, and technological implications of an increasing synergism of technology and the body in sports and the arts, at work or home, rehabilitating the body and the brain, and society at large.
LARC
Landscape Architecture Department Site
LARC151
Urban Agriculture: Designing and Assessing Edible Landscapes
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Students will examine the growing development of urban agriculture and edible landscapes. Urban agriculture has seen a recent growth and interest in cities across the globe. From Paris to New York, from Baltimore to Detroit, urban agriculture is an emerging land use to address a variety of needs. Redevelopment, food deserts, community engagement and environmental justice are just some of the issues and topics that are connected to the recent growth of urban agriculture. This course will take a critical examination of urban agriculture's contribution to the food system, its input and outputs in the urban landscape, and the planning and design of urban agriculture and edible landscapes.
LING
Linguistics Department Site
LING262
HERITAGE LANGUAGES AND THEIR SPEAKERS
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Additional information: One class per week will be in-field instruction in collecting data from heritage speakers.
An interdisciplinary examination of the phenomenon of heritage language (a bilingual's home language which is distinct from the dominant language of the wider society). Relationship between linguistic structure, cultural and social aspects of language use, and language change. Interpretations of experimental and theoretical work. Relevance of heritage languages for linguistic theory, language policy, and education.
NFSC
Nutrition and Food Science Department Site
NFSC220
Diet: Is it a cause or a solution
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
If diet is a very straightforward topic; then why and how does this simple matter result in complicated health problems? Diet can provide a simple solution to numerous health issues. So, why do many people fail to follow this seemingly simple solution and still suffer from obesity and other diet-related diseases? Diet is a topic that most people know but few people understand. In addition, diet has become one of the most important lenses for looking at a variety of social, economic, and cultural issues. Since the concept of diet is continuum and has multifaceted aspects, we need to understand it in broad and multidisciplinary perspectives including social, cultural and economic aspects.
PHIL
Philosophy Department Site
PHIL201
Spooky Action at a Distance? Where Physics Meets Metaphysics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Recommended: Students should be comfortable with moderately mathematical presentations. Placement into MATH110 or higher is strongly recommended.
Credit only granted for: PHIL201 or PHIL209I.
Formerly: PHIL209I.
Einstein believed that physics should represent a "reality in space and time, free from spooky action at a distance." He worried that quantum theory failed this test. Later developments suggest that quantum systems really can influence one another instantly, no matter how far apart they are, but the question remains controversial and experiments are not sufficient to provide an answer. This self-contained course will draw on philosophy and physics to investigate the controversy.
PHIL202
Know Thyself: Wisdom Through Cognitive Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PHIL209N or PHIL202.
Formerly: PHIL209N.
How do we improve our decision making? Cognitive science demonstrates that self-knowledge isn't as easy as we think, and that there are numerous biases and fallacies that impact our decision-making in ways that are hard for us to be aware of. In this course you will learn what some of these are and how they have been discovered, and you will explore potential strategies for avoiding these fallacies and for making wiser choices.
PHIL203
The Rights and Wrongs of Killing People
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PHIL209J or PHIL203.
Formerly: PHIL209J.
Virtually everyone thinks it's permissible to kill people only in special circumstances. But why is killing usually wrong? Is it ever acceptable to kill an innocent human being intentionally? This course raises these and related questions and examines cases such as terrorism, suicide, abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, war. Except for a brief discussion of animals, all the controversies considered deal with killing and causing death to human beings.
PHYS
Physics Department Site
PHYS199M
The Manhattan Project
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSNS, SCIS
Additional information: This course has no prerequisites. However, the course will use mathematics extensively at the level up to and including standard high school algebra II. Students will need to be comfortable applying mathematics at this level.
Introduction to some critical ideas of nuclear physics and a review of some key historical developments starting at the end of the 19th century. Chronological development of nuclear physics from the discovery of radioactivity by Becquerel in 1896 through to the discovery of fission in Germany in 1938 followed by an examination of the programs to develop nuclear weapons in the United States, Britain and Germany. Extensive study of political, ethical, scientific, military, social, and economic issues surrounding the Manhattan Project.
PLCY
Public Policy
PLCY101
Great Thinkers on Public Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Great ideas in public policy, such as equality, efficiency, sovereignty, liberty, bureaucracy, democracy and security are explored through the lens of great thinkers. An introduction to the intellectual foundations of public policy, from ancient theories on collective public action through the more contemporary development of public policy as a discipline. This may start as early as the ancient Greek philosophers and their views on public action through contemporary classics of public policy. At the conclusion of the course, students will have read classic works in the field and will master the key themes that have dominated the intellectual debates about public policy over its history. Emphasis will be on the interdisciplinary foundations of public policy, through examining core disciplinary contributions from economics, political science, management, philosophy, and other relevant disciplines.
PLCY201
Public Leaders and Active Citizens
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PLCY201 or PUAF201.
Formerly: PUAF201.
Aims to inspire, teach and engage students in the theory and practice of public leadership from the local to the national to the global level. Students will learn and apply diverse approaches to leadership in a multicultural society while developing an understanding of key frameworks and practices necessary to foster collective action across private, public, and nonprofit sectors. This course will allow students to become informed citizens able to reason critically and persuasively about public matters Students will also explore and assess their own personal values, beliefs, and purpose as they develop their leadership potential.
PLCY201S
Public Leaders and Active Citizens
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PLCY201 or PUAF201.
Formerly: PUAF201.
Aims to inspire, teach and engage students in the theory and practice of public leadership from the local to the national to the global level. Students will learn and apply diverse approaches to leadership in a multicultural society while developing an understanding of key frameworks and practices necessary to foster collective action across private, public, and nonprofit sectors. This course will allow students to become informed citizens able to reason critically and persuasively about public matters Students will also explore and assess their own personal values, beliefs, and purpose as they develop their leadership potential.
Restricted to freshman students in College Park Scholars Public Leadership program.
PLCY214
Leading and Investing in Social Change: Re-defining and Experimenting with Philanthropy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PLCY214, PUAF214 or PUAF359I.
Formerly: PUAF359I, PUAF214.
Defines philanthropy as an exploration of how one develops a vision of the public good and then deploys resources (including donations, volunteers, and voluntary associations) to achieve an impact.
Restricted to students in Carillon Communities.
PLCY380
Innovation and Social Change: Do Good Now
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ARHU380, BSOS388B, PLCY388D, or PLCY380.
Formerly: PLCY388D.
Introduces students to the concept of social innovation while exploring the many mechanisms for achieving social impact. It is team-based, highly interactive and dynamic, and provides an opportunity for students to generate solutions to a wide range of problems facing many communities today. Deepens the students understanding of entrepreneurship and innovation practices by guiding them through the creation and implementation process as applied to a project idea of their choice.
PLSC
Plant Sciences
PLSC115
How Safe is Your Salad? The Microbiological Safety of Fresh produce
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Recommended: PLSC110 and PLSC111; or (PLSC112 and PLSC113); or BSCI105; or (BSCI170 and BSCI171).
As food is produced in larger quantities and made to travel longer distances, keeping our food safe in this day and age is an ever growing challenge. This course will focus on the question of what it takes to grow and maintain safe fruits and vegetables, as food travels along the path from the farm to your fork. Food safety of fresh produce will be discussed from the public health, agricultural, economical and policy perspectives.
PLSC125
Feeding Ten Billion by 2050: Food Security and Crop Protection
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
A big question concerning global food security is "how can we feed 10 billion people in 2050?" This course will stimulate creative thinking about possible solutions particularly from the crop production perspective. The instructors will introduce the concept of food security and different dimensions of this complex issue, identify major constraints to food security, and discuss scientific approaches that may be used to meet the grand challenge. Emphasis will be placed on topical and controversial issues such as the impact of climate change, biofuel production and GM crops on food security, and novel strategies that can improve food security.
PLSC130
Did Yeast Create Civilization?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Recommended: CHEM103, CHEM131, CHEM135, or CHEM146.
Cross-listed with: AGST130.
Credit only granted for: AGST130 or PLSC130.
Fermented foods have played a major role in the transition from nomadic to settled agrarian societies, the establishment of social and religious customs, the expansion of empires, and modern economies. To what extent are our past and current attitudes towards fermented foods rooted in historical and cultural imprints? Explore the central role of fermentation in human history and culture, the basic microbiological processes underlying fermentation processes, and the processes used to produce and distribute fermented foods. Find out how the fruits, grains, and dairy products used to produce fermented foods are grown and selected. Students will learn about the development and modern use of fermented dairy products, pickles, bread, tea, chocolate, wine, beer, distilled liquors, and pharmaceutical/manufactured products.
There will be 5 required live synchronous meetings via Zoom througout the semester. Please see instructor for details.

There will be a required live/synchronous meeting on the first week of classes via Zoom on Monday, 8/30/2021 at 5pm. If there is a time change to the meeting time, this will be communicated via ELMS.
PSYC
Psychology Department Site
PSYC234
Living the Good Life: The Psychology of Happiness
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PSYC234 or PSYC289D.
Formerly: PSYC289D.
What are the secrets to living a happy life? Can happiness be found within the context of war, a depressed economy, violence and other major stressors? Are some people born happier than others? This course will teach you the scientific process that psychologists use to study happiness (and related emotional variables) and give you the opportunity to practice applying that process in a number of ways. You will learn how we (a) gather and critically evaluate research findings in the existing literature, (b) integrate those findings into coherent and testable theories, (c) design and conduct valid scientific research that tests those theories and extends our knowledge, and (d) effectively communicate our theories and findings to a wide range of audiences. The result of the process is a more accurate and objective understanding of happiness, and that is what prepares you to apply your scientific understanding to explain and influence a wide range of outcomes.
RELS
Religious Studies
RELS171
Is Judaism a Religion?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: JWST171.
Credit only granted for: JWST171 or RELS171.
Jewish identity can be framed in terms of ethnicity, culture, and religious practice, but also in terms of more contemporary social constructions including social action, political engagement, and intellectual pursuit. In the context of such diverse social and individual frames, what does it mean to identify Judaism as a religion? Attention to Jewish society in historical and global perspective will provide a backdrop for a particular focus on contemporary Jews in the United States and Israel.
RELS274
Jerusalem in Antiquity: The History of Sacred Space in a Holy City
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: JWST274.
Credit only granted for: JWST274, RELS274, JWST289J or RELS289J.
Formerly: JWST289J, RELS289J.
Examines the complex history of Jerusalem's status as a holy city, with a focus on constructions of sacred space in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
SLLC
School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures Department Site
SLLC280
Mythology of the Oppressed
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: SLLC280 or SLLC299J.
Formerly: SLLC299J.
Does information drive human history? Mythological recurrences say much about cultures that had to adapt their world views while attempting to preserve them. This course examines the cognitive or social bases of mythology, to be pursued from insights in cultural and literary studies, linguistics, the cognitive sciences, paleo-anthropology, archeology, etc. The course is designed to help students think about complex problems from a humanistic perspective, making liberal use of the sciences.
Restricted to Carillon Community Language students.
SLLC286
Living the Good Life: Chinese Philosophy in the Modern World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Additional information: Taught in English.
Confucius, Mencius, Zhuangzi and other Chinese thinkers who lived more than 2,000 years ago would argue that the contemporary Western emphasis on self-discovery (Find yourself) and self-acceptance has led you astray. See what they have to say and discuss what relevance it has for the modern world as we study how early Chinese thinkers wrestled with questions of existence, morality, and governance. No previous knowledge of Chinese philosophy and history will be assumed and no prerequisites are required. We will discuss ideas that are both historical and relevant to students' lives. What is "the Way"? How do we cultivate spontaneity? Is there a stable self? How can we be more alive? These are questions important for ancient kings but also for UMD students choosing a major, or wondering how ARHU can benefit them.
SOCY
Sociology Department Site
SOCY120
Veterans in American Society: What does America Owe Its Veterans?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
An examination of current and past policies toward compensation for military veterans, data and evidence on current and past adjustments to life after military service, historical variations in the mechanisms for staffing the military, and trends in the contours of the lives of those who do not serve.
SOCY200
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
A comparative, historical, interdisciplinary study of human socieities that focuses on the main components of human societies, how they are organized, how they change, and how they come to shape our collective social existence.
SOCY224
Why are We Still Talking About Race?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Exploration of the major debates and assumptions that construct individual perceptions of what race is and how race matters. Sociological and sub-cultural theories will give students a historical and present day frame with which to view race and ethnic relations in the twenty-first century.
SPHL
Public Health Department Site
SPHL291
Does Science Support Nontraditional Healing Practices?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Recommended: Successful completion of English composition course.
Does yoga improve the health of wounded warriors and/or breast cancer survivors? Can mindfulness enhance your business success and family relationships, or is it social media hype? Do you know what reflexology is, and does it help reduce your personal stress level? Increasing numbers of people are using nutritional supplements, meditation, yoga and other forms of exercise, acupuncture and experiences in nature to reduce stress levels and improve overall health and well-being. In the media, scientists to celebrities have alternately endorsed or rejected claims about how these and other nontraditional health practices benefit health and well-being. Students will sample some of these nontraditional health practices and explore whether these practices can enhance their own well-being. General scientific methods for health research will be introduced and students will use this knowledge to evaluate the existing scientific research on these practices. Students will also evaluate whether popular and media translation of scientific research on these practices is fact-based.
TLPL
Teaching and Learning, Policy and Leadership Department Site
TLPL288W
Special Problems in Education; Forbidden Books: Censorship of Children's and Young Adult Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
URSP
Urban Studies and Planning
URSP250
The Sustainable City: Exploring Opportunities and Challanges
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
An exploration, through an interdisciplinary approach, of a number of issues related to making cities more sustainable in terms of environmental protection, economic opportunity, and social justice. The course assist students to develop skills in critical analysis and systems thinking and to use those skills in analyzing sustainability related problems and potential solutions, and to expand students' understanding of the political implications of crafting and moving towards a sustainable urban future.
WGSS
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
WGSS290
Bodies in Contention
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: WMST298D or WGSS290.
Formerly: WMST298D.
Explores the contributions of feminist scholarship in framing and resolving contemporary controversies concerning gendered bodies. It includes the ways in which knowledge about the human body has been shaped by cultural ideas of gender, race, sexuality and ability.