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Courses - Spring 2022
AASP
African American Studies Department Site
AASP187
The New Jim Crow: African-Americans, Mass Incarceration and the Prison Industrial Complex
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Recommended: AASP100.
Students will examine the birth of the racial caste system following the abolition of slavery, the parallels between the racial hierarchy of the Jim Crow system and contemporary mass incarceration, and the rise of the prison industrial complex as a multi-billon business which thrives on the oppression of low-income populations and poor communities of color.
AASP211
Get Out: The Sunken Place of Race Relations in the Post-Racial Era
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: AASP298G or AASP211.
Formerly: AASP298G.
Prevailing thought suggests that we live in an era that is post-racial, particularly after the election of Barack Obama. Media often serves to drive our assessment of where our nation stands on issues like race, gender and sexuality. This course uses the film Get Out to delve into the production, evolution and significance of race in present day America. The course will engage multiple forms of media to investigate life in "Post-Racial" America, including but not limited to the role of stereotypes, interracial relationships, police-community relations, etc.
AMST
American Studies Department Site
AMST260
American Culture in the Information Age
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: AMST260 or AMST298I.
Formerly: AMST298I.
Examines the ways in which content and form of public information interact with the culture, families & individuals.
AMST290
Shifting Sands: Constructing Cultural Mainstreams and Margins in the U.S.
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: AMST289A or AMST290.
Formerly: AMST289A.
Examines the construction, operation, and meaning of cultural mainstreams and margins in a range of contexts, spaces, and times in the U.S. Using a variety of primary sources, research methods, and interdisciplinary scholarship, we will explore how Americans make and assign meaning to cultural mainstreams and margins. We will examine how and why cultural margins and mainstreams shift over time and what their consequences have been for social policies, laws, power relations, and national identity.
Examines the construction, operation, and meaning of cultural mainstreams and margins in a range of contexts, spaces, and times in the U.S. Using a variety of primary sources, research methods, and interdisciplinary scholarship, we will explore how Americans make and assign meaning to cultural mainstreams and margins. We will examine how and why cultural margins and mainstreams shift over time and what their consequences have been for social policies, laws, power relations, and national identity.
ANSC
Animal Science
ANSC227
Eating with Eyes Wide Open
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Students will investigate the tension that is created by trade-offs that, knowingly or not, are made by consumers relative to agricultural production methods and dietary choices. Course will inform students about their food supply so they can make informed decisions and practice intentional or informed eating.
ANTH
Anthropology Department Site
ANTH242
Fire, Farming and Climate Change: An Archaeology Take on the History of Human Impacts on our Planet
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
An examination of why climate changes, the methods for recording climate change, and case studies of the varied responses of past human societies to climate change in different geographic regions and time periods with varying socio-political and economic systems.
ANTH266
Changing Climate, Changing Cultures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Explore past, present, and future interactions between humans and climate. Discussions, methods-oriented activities, and case study analyses provide students a foundation for appreciating the role of anthropology in understanding, responding to, and preparing for climate change.
AOSC
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science
AOSC123
Causes and Implications of Global Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Cross-listed with GEOL123.
Credit only granted for: AOSC123, GEOG123, GEOL123, or METO123.
Formerly: METO123.
Responsible policy and decision making on issues related to the global environment requires understanding of the basic scientific issues, relationships between the geophysical and biological sciences, the impacts on regional and global endeavors, and the political manner in which humans respond. This course embodies an integrated introduction to the broad scientific and social aspects of the global change problem.
AOSC200
Weather and Climate
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with AOSC201) or DSNS, SCIS
Prerequisite: MATH107, MATH110, or MATH115.
Recommended: Concurrent enrollment in AOSC201.
What are weather and climate? Most people think they know but if you ask people to explain the differences and similarities you're bound to get a range of answers. Weather affects not just our daily activities but other important aspects of society such as transportation, commerce, security and agriculture. Most people understand what weather is to some extent. Climate and climate change are concepts that evoke strong emotional responses from people but are less well understood. In this class, students examine fundamental issues such as the greenhouse effect, severe weather, and global weather patterns and how they relate to a changing climate. Instruction in the lectures will provide the basic knowledge needed to understand these issues. In the discussion sections, students will be divided into groups to address the implications of these topics through group projects.

A Marquee Science and Technology Course designed for Non-Science Majors: http://www.marqueecourses.umd.edu/* Click here for more Marquee course information.
ARCH
Architecture Department Site
ARCH272
Sustainability at College Park
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS or DSSP, SCIS
Explore the ways and the degrees to which University of Maryland, College Park campus master planning and operations incorporate principles of sustainability including smart growth, LEED and other building rating systems, higher education rating systems, sustainable agriculture and transportation planning. Among other subjects, students will learn about the Campus and the City of College Park and survey the relationship between local, national and global sustainability concerns. Students will learn about the University's Climate Action Plan and the roles, and extent to which, the UMD Office of Sustainability and other campus units are helping develop a carbon-neutral and resource-efficient campus infrastructure.
AREC
Agricultural and Resource Economics Department Site
AREC210
The Food Chain: What Happens As Your Food Goes From Farm to Table
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Food supply chains link farms, input providers, traders, food processors, and retailers. We assess how supply chains are organized, how they use technologies, and how they are adapting their organization and technologies to meet the challenges facing the food system and society. The challenges include: 1) Producing enough food to meet a growing global population, while reducing damages to air, water, and soil resources; (2) Meeting the health challenges posed by obesity and food insecurity, while also meeting consumer preferences for how food should be produced; and (3) Doing all this in the face of climate change.
ARHU
Arts and Humanities Department Site
ARHU380
Arts & Humanities in Social Innovation, Change, and Justice: Do Good Now
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ARHU380, BSOS388B, or PLCY388D.
The course serves as the core course for the Arts-and-Humanities track in PLCY's minor in "Nonprofit Leadership and Social Innovation." Students will be introduced to the role that the Arts and Humanities can play in social innovation and social change, while exploring various mechanisms for achieving impact with a focus on advancing social justice, equity and systems change. This course deepens understandings of nonprofit leadership, entrepreneurship and social innovation by guiding students through the creation and implementation of social change projects and ventures of their choice.
Cross-listed with JWST319P. For Spring 2022: Credit granted only for JWST319P, ARHU380, BSOS388B, or PLCY388D.
ARTH
Art History & Archaeology Department Site
ARTH265
How (and Why) to Look at Art in the Era of Climate Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ARTH265 or ARTH465.
Formerly: ARTH465.
How can art help us build the mindset necessary for fashioning a sustainable civilization? Paintings, photographs, films, novels, songs, and other creative works as they shape beliefs related to sustainability and justice.
ASTR
Astronomy Department Site
ASTR220
Collisions in Space - The Threat of Asteroid Impacts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in Astronomy program.
Additional information: Course is open to Astronomy and Planetary Sciences minors.
How can we defend our planet against a possible asteroid impact? Collisions in Space will evaluate the threat of asteroid impacts with the Earth using knowledge of asteroid characteristics and orbits. The merits of possible defense plans will be discussed, as well as the budgetary and political concerns associated with implementing any such plan. Appropriate for non-science majors.
ASTR230
The Science and Fiction of Planetary Systems
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Prerequisite: Must have math eligibility of MATH115 or higher; or MATH113.
Have you ever wondered if humans will ever terraform Mars or Europa so we could live there without a spacesuit? Has it ever crossed your mind how lucky you are that you live on a water-rich planet with an oxygen-rich atmosphere? Have you ever suspected novelists and scriptwriters of creating ridiculous planets that violate scientific laws? Does the fate of our planet's thin biosphere keep you up at night? How common is life in the Universe? These are difficult questions, but armed with the right information, you can answer all of them. The Science and Fiction of Planetary Systems will help you develop a deeper understanding of why planets are the way they are. Along the way, you'll see examples of mistakes made in classic science fiction movies, novels and short stories and get the chance to invent your own plausible planets!
BMGT
Business and Management Department Site
BMGT289A
Social Enterprise: Changing the World through Innovation and Transformative Action
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
In this course, students will hear from real-life social entrepreneurs, explore current day social issues of sustainability, climate change, leadership, disruptive innovations, and create or blueprint business plans to generate positive social change. This class will focus on innovative thinking skills, personal narratives, and social interaction strategies and plans.
BMGT289B
How Do Innovators Think?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
In this course, students will learn about: a) the innovation process and the role of the individual in generating innovations and b) the attributes, habits, and skills of individuals who have successfully started innovative new businesses or significantly added value to an existing company.
This class will have an additional 5 meetings on Monday evenings from 5-7pm.
BMGT289D
Frauds, Scams, and Thefts: What, How and Why?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
The primary objective of this course is for students to gain a conceptual understanding of how fraud occurs, how it can be prevented, and how fraud can be detected through practical application of skills and tools. This course provides general background relating to fraud (e.g. history, prevalence, psychology), and it delves into the myriad types of fraud, scams and theft. This course also examines the trends in fraud detection and investigation; and introduces and explores with students the constant tension between public order and civil liberties in white collar crime, forensics, and hacking.
BMGT289E
Entrepreneurial Thinking for Non-Business Majors: How Not to Miss Great Opportunities Your Life Throws at You
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
In this course, students learn how to analyze the world around them and then notice and define new trends, emerging problems, impending gaps, and how to turn these into exciting opportunities by providing creative solutions. Students will have a chance to not only sharpen their critical thinking skills, but also learn how to take initiative, develop a working solution, identify and resolve conflicts, and be confident and persistent, yet flexible enough to respond to changes. Student teams identify a compelling problem in present day life and then propose a creative solution taking into account possible difficulties in implementation. In addition, students will also be given problems on a much smaller scale and asked to create and present a workable solution. Students will be exposed to how a visionary's mind works and the creative solution process. In addition, students will also learn how entrepreneurial thinking can improve their day-to-day life.
BMGT289I
Why Good Managers Make Bad Decisions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
This course provides an overview of the concepts, approaches, and vocabulary of evidence-based management (EBM) and provides an understanding of how experts in many disciplines can employ evidenced based decision making. EBM is an emerging movement in business to explicitly use the current best information in management decision making with special emphasis on relevant scientific findings and unbiased organizational facts. The course stresses how individuals practicing EBM learn how to rethink their approaches to data and knowledge in order to make more effective decisions.
BSCI
Biological Sciences Program Department Site
BSCI135
Amazing Green: Plants that Transformed the World
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, SCIS
An interactive way to learn about plants and science, focusing on how plants have changed human history, the biology of their growth, and the science behind their use.
BSCI223
General Microbiology
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, SCIS
Prerequisite: BSCI170 and BSCI171; or BSCI105.
Credit only granted for: BSCI223 or BSCI283.
Fundamental concepts in morphology, physiology, genetics, immunology, ecology, and pathogenic microbiology. Applications of microbiology to medicine, the food industry and biotechnology.
(Sponsoring Dept.: CBMG) Students must pay a $40.00 laboratory materials fee.
BSCI283
Principles of Microbiology
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, SCIS
Prerequisite: BSCI222.
Restriction: Must be in a major within Biological Sciences; or permission of CMNS-Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics.
Credit only granted for: BSCI223 or BSCI283.
Additional information: Priority given to BSCI, BCHM and CHEM majors.
Introduction to microorganisms designed for science majors. Genetic principles underlying microbial abilities; microbial structure-function relationships; metabolism, physiology, and ecology of microorganisms; interactions between microorganisms (including pathogens) and their hosts.
(Sponsoring Dept.: CBMG). Students must pay a $40.00 laboratory materials fee.
CCJS
Criminology and Criminal Justice Department Site
CCJS225
Responses to Violence
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
Conflict is unfortunately resolved through violence in a number of settings. It ranges from interpersonal to international in its scope. This course investigates the strengths and weakness of a number of resolutions to reducing violence over the course of history using both state centered and informal control.
CCJS325
Slavery in the Twenty First Century: Combating Human Trafficking
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: CCJS325 or CCJS498R.
Formerly: CCJS498R.
The trafficking of human beings in its historical, legal, economic, political and social contexts. Scope of the global problem, different forms of human trafficking, and regional trends and practices. Roles of government, the international community and individual actors. Strategies to combat trafficking.
CHSE
Counseling, Higher Education, and Special Education
CHSE205
Disability: From Stigma and Sideshow to Mainstream and Main Street
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: EDSP289I or CHSE205.
Formerly: EDSP289I.
Explores the cultural, historical, educational, and medical roots of difference among human beings and examines the impact of cultural and technological changes on individuals traditionally identified as disabled. The course is designed to develop a broad understanding of the concept of "disability" and the emerging technologies that shape contemporary understanding of this phenomenon and the lives of those considered disabled.
CLAS
Classics Department Site
CLAS276
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: CLAS276 or CLAS289A.
Formerly: CLAS289A.
America, from its very origins as an independent nation, saw itself as the new Rome: its system of government is built on Roman precedents, its national buildings look as if they came from the Roman Forum, and its leisure activities take us to stadiums modeled on the Colosseum. America's relationship to Rome, however, raises its greatest anxiety: will America fall as Rome did? In 1776, the year of American independence, Edward Gibbon published his History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire; America has been thinking about the trajectory of its history alongside Rome's from the very beginning.
CPBE
College Park Scholars-Business, Society, and Economy
CPBE270
College Park Scholars: Business, Society & the Economy Education Abroad Practicum
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, DVCC, SCIS
Prerequisite: CPBE100; or by permission.
Restriction: Students must be matriculated into the College Park Scholars Business, Society & the Economy (CPBE) program; or by permission.
Cross-listed with: HONR298A.
Credit only granted for: CPBE270 or HONR298A.
Additional information: Students taking this course as HONR298A should contact the Honors College for permission to register.
Education-abroad experience with content in areas related to business, society and/or the economy.
CPSS
College Park Scholars-Science, Technology and Society
CPSS225
College Park Scholars Capstone: Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Prerequisite: CPSS100.
Restriction: Must be in the College Park Scholars Science, Technology & Society (CPSS) program.
Formerly: CPSP227.
Exploration and understanding of ways science and technology shape and are shaped by society.
CPSS240
College Park Scholars: Science, Technology & Society - Service-Learning Practicum
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Restriction: Matriculation into the College Park Scholars Science, Technology & Society (CPSS) program; or permission of instructor.
Supervised Service-Learning practicum in issues related to science, technology and society.
ECON
Economics Department Site
ECON175
Inequality: Determinants and Policy Remedies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
History shows that the gap between the rich and the poor has varied over time within and between countries, most recently seeming to increase within many countries while somewhat decreasing between countries. This course challenges students to investigate why people make different amounts of money, why income inequality has changed dramatically in recent years, what public policy tools exist to counter inequality increases, and what different institutional arrangements different countries use to lower inequality. This course will introduce students to theoretical tools used by economists to understand the sources of inequality and will also examine various empirical measures of inequality.
ECON185
Energy: Crisis or Breakthrough?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Will we face an energy crisis in the near future, or will technological breakthroughs solve problems? Will we destroy the environment by careless use of polluting energy, or we will find new and clean sources of energy that resolves the environmental issue once and for all? Will politicians and governments succeed in agreeing on a coherent strategy to deal with global issues related to energy, or do we expect individual countries to move in different directions and exacerbate the problems? Students will explore the demand and supply sides of the energy market and their relationships with government policies and environmental concerns. Students will also analyze empirical evidence to better understand the factors affecting energy production and consumption in the past and possible directions in the future. By examining past situations when technological change mitigated problems in energy markets, we can make informed predictions about what could happen next.
EDHD
Education, Human Development Department Site
EDHD221
Aggression and Violence in Everyday Life: Can Violence Be Prevented?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
History of aggression and violence in the world and in the United States. Examines the extent to which various forms are prevalent today and scientifically supported prevention strategies. Methods of studying aggression are reviewed, as are theories and methods of preventing aggression and violence.
ENEE
Electrical & Computer Engineering Department Site
ENEE200
Technology and Consequences: Engineering, Ethics, and Humanity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Cross-listed with: ENES200.
Credit only granted for: ENEE200 or ENES200.
What makes a technology socially responsible? At UMD, the Fearless Ideas campaign asks us to aim our enthusiasm for technology at big real problems. At the same time, we are coming to appreciate the increasingly complex nature of technological systems as they become integrated into all forms of infrastructure, we realize they may be unpredictable, interdependent on social and biological systems, and have unintended consequences. In this midst of this complexity, people make decisions with far reaching impacts. How then do we follow our passion for technology and innovation but also stay skeptical in a way that allows us to consider the potential and shortcomings of technology? Designed for both engineering and non-engineering students wishing to explore and assess the impact of engineering technology on society and the role of society in generating that technology.
Restricted to students in Electrical Engineering (09090) and Computer Engineering (09991) majors only. Non-majors interested in the course should get into the holdfile; Department will make seats available to students in the holdfile after December 8, 2021.
ENES
Engineering Science
ENES210
Entrepreneurial Opportunity Analysis and Decision-Making in 21st Century Technology Ventures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENES210 or ENES461.
This multi-disciplinary course helps students learn the principles of entrepreneurial opportunity analysis and decision-making in an increasingly dynamic and technically-inclined society. Emphasis is placed on how aspiring technology entrepreneurs can develop their entrepreneurial perspectives to develop winning entrepreneurial plans for their future ventures.
All questions regarding this course should bedirected to mtecheducation@umd.edu.
ENGL
English Department Site
ENGL121
The Power of Song: Renaissance Lyric and Its Afterlives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Examines the power that song has over its audiences. Drawing on literary, performance, and sound studies, we will investigate how song takes hold of its listeners in uniquely moving ways. We will examine the special appeal of song in early modern England, including works by William Shakespeare, John Milton, and William Byrd. And we will compare the song culture of the English Renaissance to the power of song in contemporary life, from Kendrick Lamar to CocoRosie.
ENGL125
Why Poetry Matters
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Introduction to the formal fundamentals of poetry and exploration of the role poetry plays in how we think about the human condition; what constitutes knowledge and wisdom, interior subjectivity and communal identity; and how this knowledge is to be used in confronting new challenges and the perennial questions: how to live with oneself, and as oneself; in time, and with others; here, where we reside; and elsewhere, where we imagine ourselves going.
ENGL142
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENGL142 or ENGL289M.
Formerly: ENGL289M.
What does the literature of Maryland teach us about our state's past, present, and future? "Literary Maryland" explores this question by taking students on a tour of our state's prose, poetry, and drama from colonization to the present. In addition to reading fascinating writing and visiting interesting places, you'll learn how the Chesapeake was formed; why nobody sings the entire national anthem; and what led Baltimore to name its football team after a poem written by a Virginian.
ENGL146
Seeing the Present: Graphic Storytelling in the Age of Social Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
We increasingly live in a world dominated by digital images: graphic narratives, data visualizations, tweets, GIFs, and computer animation. Students will learn how to critically analyze this digital visual rhetoric and how to become a skilled user of visual discourse. By examining a range of science fiction, graphic novels, photography, and films, we will develop a critical vocabulary for understanding the possibilities and perils of our digital image culture. We will apply this vocabulary to analyzing visual representations of contemporary political questions including: climate change, criminal justice, bio-technological transformations of the human, and the incorporation of algorithm-based platforms into everyday life.
ENMA
Engineering, Materials Department Site
ENMA201
Bigger, Faster, Better: The Quest for Absolute Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENMA201 or ENMA289A.
Formerly: ENMA289A.
The goal of the course is to familiarize the students with applied science and engineering concepts necessary to understand technological advances, breakthroughs and world-leading achievements that have shaped our present lives and will impact our future. The political, economic, and personal driving forces behind selected technological transformations, societal contexts, and conflicts that are inherent in unsustainable technology will also be covered.
ENSP
Environmental Science and Policy Department Site
ENSP250
Lawns in the Landscape: Environmental Hero or Villain?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Cross-listed with PLSC250.
Credit only granted for: ENSP250 or PLSC250.
Examination of the lawn as an element in the anthropogenic landscape and its influence on global warming, regional air and water quality, ecological diversity, mammalian pesticide exposure and consumptive water use. Demographic and socioeconomic factors are examined in the context of being predictors of landscape aesthetic desires and lawn management behaviors. Policies that incentivize lawn alternatives or changes in lawn management behavior are discussed.
FMSC
Family Science Department Site
FMSC190
Man Up! Where Are The Fathers?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
An examination of changing fatherhood roles, health, and inequality in diverse families. Focus will be on masculinities and disparities among men by race and class; provider role expectations; and trauma and violence faced by men in contemporary society.
GEMS
Gemstone
GEMS104
Topics in Science, Technology and Society (STS)
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Prerequisite: GEMS100.
Restriction: Must be in the Gemstone program.
An examination of how cultural, economic, political and social forces shape scientific and technological systems and, conversely, how scientific and technological systems have affected the culture, economies, organization and politics of societies. Students in the course will form small teams to carry out semester-long research on socio/technical topics related to the course theme chosen for that specific semester.
GEMS104 discussions will be various times through the week beginning January 24 and running through spring break on March 18. Beginning with week 9, March 28 (the week after spring break), GEMS104 lectures will continue to be on Tuesdays from 5-6:15pm and discussions will move to Thursdays (March 31 is the first Thursday) from 5-6:15pm.
GEOG
Geographical Sciences Department Site
GEOG140
Natural Disasters: Earthquakes, Floods, and Fires
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Catastrophic Environmental Events (CCE) that are becoming more common in this time of global environmental change and it is essential that today's students be equipped with the knowledge and skills to be leaders as we, as a society, understand the upheaval that these CCEs are causing. Students will examine how CEEs shape human society and ecosystem from the interdisciplinary perspective afforded by the field of Geography. Students will use the latest geographic science concepts and techniques in exploring these events. Using satellite imagery they will gain a multi-scale perspective of the ecological and societal aspects of the events.
GEOG172
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Earth observations from space enable the mapping and monitoring of our changing planet. This survey course reviews current observational capabilities and examines scientific applications in quantifying global environmental change. Drivers and outcomes of key dynamics will be illustrated and discussed, including sea and continental ice loss, deforestation, ocean warming, urbanization, agricultural expansion and intensification, and vegetation response to climate change.
GEOL
Geology Department Site
GEOL123
Causes and Consequences of Global Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Cross-listed with AOSC123.
Credit only granted for: AOSC123, GEOG123, GEOL123, or METO123.
Study of the major components of Earth's climate system and climate change history. Discussion of 21st century climate change prediction, mitigation and adaptation efforts.
GEOL204
Dinosaurs, Early Humans, Ancestors, and Evolution; The Fossil Record of Vanished Worlds of the Prehistoric Past
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Examination of evidence used to reconstruct critical events in the history of life by looking at case studies of significant evolutionary origins, transitions, and extinctions; addressing the role of paleontology in human society, including science education, conservation, and the media.
GVPT
Government and Politics Department Site
GVPT210
Religions, Beliefs, and World Affairs
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: GVPT210 or GVPT289L.
Formerly: GVPT289L.
Introduces students to an increasingly important question: what is the relationship between religion and politics around the world? For a long period in the 20th Century, religion seemed to be decreasing in importance. Eventually, it was thought, religion would simply go away and secularism, development, and rationality would rule the day. In the last generation, however, events like the Iranian Revolution, the rise of the Christian Right, 9/11, the Tibetan monks protest, the spread of Truth and Reconciliation Commissions, and numerous wars fought in the name of God have brought religion back to prominence in world affairs. In this course, we will explore the contemporary impact of religions on politics around the world, through four broad themes: how to understand religion in politics , the relationship between religion and the state, religious groups as sources of conflict and peace, and contemporary religio-political challenges.
GVPT289D
How to Make Better Decisions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
The problem with decisions is that we rarely, if ever, find out if our decisions were good or bad. Was choosing your major, for instance, a good decision or could you have made a better one? I don't think most of us would ever know the answer to this question. So, is it possible that we regularly make bad decisions but don't know that we do? And, if so, how can we fix something if we don't know it is broken? In fact, we do regularly make bad decisions. This has been shown in many experimental studies some of which will be covered in this class. What is more, for some types of decision problems we are hardwired to make mistakes. This means that we are bound to go wrong regardless of how much we know or how smart we are. So, what can we do to remedy this problem? Quite a bit, as it turns out.
HACS
ACES-Cybersecurity
HACS208A
Accounting and Economic Aspects of Cybersecurity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
In today's interconnected digital world, cybersecurity has become one of the most important issues confronting organizations in both the private and public sectors of an economy. Indeed, cybersecurity is a national and economic security priority in countries throughout the world. This is an interdisciplinary Honors Seminar offered as part of UMD's ACES program. The primary objective of this course is to discuss the relationships among accounting, economics and cybersecurity, with a focus on the important roles of accounting and economics in understanding the issues related to cybersecurity. A basic framework for assessing the interactions among accounting, economics, and cybersecurity will be developed and discussed. A secondary objective of the course is to assist ACES students in developing their ability to conduct original and applied research on topics related to "accounting and economic aspects of cybersecurity."
Restriction: Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living-Learning Program. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs.
HESP
Hearing and Speech Sciences Department Site
HESP214
The Research Behind Headlines on Words, Thought, and Behavior
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HNUH278A.
Credit only granted for: HNUH278A or HESP214.
How does the human mind use language? Type "Language Science News" into your Google search bar. Among the more than 3 billion hits, headlines like "What is love? It depends what language you speak" and "Science's English dominance hinders diversity" invite you to think about the impact of words on thought and behavior. These are stories about how humans acquire and use language, but they ultimately address big questions about how we experience knowledge itself. In a world of unprecedented access to science journalism, did you ever read a headline about human behavior and wonder: How do we know? This class takes up the elegant ways cognitive scientists design experiments to answer crucial questions about language and thought, brain and behavior, that have no intuitive answers. Students will dive deep into the media coverage of their favorite claims about what we know, debate the psychological science behind these claims, and develop transferable critical-thinking skills in the process.
HISP
Historic Preservation
HISP200
The Everyday and the American Environment
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Jointly offered with HISP615.
An introduction to the theories of the everyday within the context of the American built environment. Focuses primarily on the American experience of underrepresented, minority, and/or immigrant communities; both historical and contemporary. Attempts to challenge what is meant by American in describing the American everyday built environment.
HIST
History Department Site
HIST131
The History of the American Dream
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: HIST131 or HIST289J.
Formerly: HIST289J.
An introduction to the way Americans thought of themselves in the past, and their often conflicting visions of what constituted the American Dream. Central questions will include whether or not Americans have always envisioned their country as a land of equality, opportunity, democracy, and freedom and whether or not their ideas of what these values meant changed or remained the same over time.
HIST142
Looking at America through a Global Lens
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: HIST289I or HIST142.
Formerly: HIST289I.
Looking at America will focus on a thematic approach to the study of foreign -- negative and positive -- perceptions of America in the 20th century.
HIST289A
Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Medieval Spain: Tolerance, Oppression, and the Problematic Past
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: RELS289C.
Credit only granted for: HIST289A or RELS289C.
For 800 years, medieval Spain was home to one of the most religiously diverse societies in European history. Despite frequent hostilities, the interactions of Spanish Jews, Christians, and Muslims produced a flowering of science, theology, and literature in an often remarkably tolerant climate. Students will learn how medieval Spanish people themselves experienced interreligious contact and conflict. They will also discover the modern pressures, prejudices, and ideals that have shaped historians interpretations of medieval Spain.
HIST289N
The Politics of Sexuality in America: A Historical Approach
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: WGSS298N.
Credit only granted for: HIST289N or WGSS298N.
Why do particular issues about sexuality hold such an important place in American political debates? What animates these controversies and what can a historical perspective on these issues add to our understanding of modern sexual politics? This class explores the historical sexual politics that undergird contemporary debates concerning sexuality in America. It focuses on topics that garner significant public attention - Reproductive rights - LGBTQ rights - Sexting - and explores the histories that undergird Americans disagreements.
HIST289R
Pocketbook Politics: A History of American Buying and Selling
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Provides a thematic approach to consumerism as it emerged in the United States over the course of three centuries. The history of consumption is a prism through which many aspects of social and political life may be viewed. How does what we wear, what we listen to, or what we eat shape our identities?
HIST289V
What Does It Mean to be An American?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
This course seeks to understand the on-going crisis over national identity and purpose by examining the many factors that go into the big stew known as America.
HIST289Y
Zombies, Fear, and Contagion: A Cultural History of Public Health, Medicine, and Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Historically examines how our fear of zombies reflects changing fears about the body, and anxieties about western medical and technological advancements.
HLTH
HLTH234
Global Health Messages: Understanding Exposure & Impact
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in the Community Health program.
Using a global perspective, this course teaches students to be critical consumers of current and historical health communication interventions. It also provides students with the skills to develop media interventions that target specific and general populations. Students will discover the array of diverse media messages that influence the health and well-being of individuals and communities.
HLTH234H
(Perm Req)
Global Health Messages: Understanding Exposure & Impact
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in the Community Health program.
Using a global perspective, this course teaches students to be critical consumers of current and historical health communication interventions. It also provides students with the skills to develop media interventions that target specific and general populations. Students will discover the array of diverse media messages that influence the health and well-being of individuals and communities.
HLTH264
Tweets & Likes: Digital Health & Social Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in the Community Health program.
Examines the current and potential use of digital health and social media to influence public health. Provides an overview of knowledge, skills and terminology necessary to optimize the effectiveness of these technologies to contribute to the enhancement of individual and community health.
HLTH264H
Tweets & Likes: Digital Health & Social Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in the Community Health program.
Examines the current and potential use of digital health and social media to influence public health. Provides an overview of knowledge, skills and terminology necessary to optimize the effectiveness of these technologies to contribute to the enhancement of individual and community health.
HNUH
University Honors
HNUH228A
Peace in our time? Conflict and Conflict Resolution in International Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Is the world getting more peaceful? There are currently civil wars raging in much of the world and millions of people have fled these wars as refugees or internally displaced persons. Terrorist attacks kill thousands, and can occur in any corner of the planet. At the same time many actors use strategies such as peacekeeping, mediation, promotion of human rights and post-conflict justice to resolve conflicts and build peace. In this course, we will examine conflict, peace, and conflict resolution in contemporary international politics. We will interrogate concepts such as peace, conflict, and violence, the different forms that these phenomena can take, and how we can measure their occurrence. We will discuss theoretical explanations for why individuals and groups have disputes and why these actors choose to use violence (or not) in these disputes and examine these arguments in specific cases. We will analyze conflict resolution strategies such as mediation, peacekeeping, and human rights promotion both theoretically and empirically. This discussion will allow students to develop an argument for whether the world is getting more peaceful, why it is or is not, and what this could mean about the future of violence and peace.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is the required I-Series course in the War & Peace cluster. War & Peace courses will not be offered after spring 2022. You should only take this course if you have either previously completed one coursein the War & Peace cluster, or if you will take both HNUH228A and one other War & Peace course together in spring 2022.
HNUH238A
Deliberative Democracy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
How do we change our politics, save democracy, and move beyond the "us vs. them" culture that divides us? This course begins with the premise that how we talk to one another and debate controversial issues can promote the public good or erode it in irreparable ways. Students in each class session will put principles of public dialogue into practice as they learn deliberative theories and skills that can help save democracy. Class readings will turn to historical case studies to frame the most controversial political issues we face today.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH 238A is the required I-Series course in the Deliberation cluster. Deliberation courses will not be offered after spring 2022. You should only take this course if you have either previously completed one course in the Deliberation cluster, or if you will take both HNUH238A and one other Deliberation course together in spring 2022.
HNUH248A
Identity, Places, & Spaces
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Students in this interdisciplinary course will explore multi-layered issues related to privilege and oppression through their own life experiences via exposure to theory, research, film, memoirs, and current events. Students will evaluate and critique common assumptions about the meaning and experiences of privilege and oppression using Intersectionality theory as a guiding framework. The human experience related to various social identities (i.e., race, gender and gender identity, sexual orientation, social class, religion, age, and ability) will be addressed.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is the required I-Series course in the Identity & Intersectionality cluster. Identity & Intersectionality courses will not be offered after spring 2022. Yyou should only take this course if you have either previously completed one course in the Identity &Intersectionality cluster, or if you will take both HNUH248A and one other Identity & Intersectionality course together in spring 2022.
HNUH258A
Harvesting Big Data to Examine Agriculture and Climate Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Can agricultural production keep up with climate change? Data analytics and data science are driving the force behind the digital revolution, which has changed the way we are able to analyze and interpret the world. The explosion of data offers both opportunities and challenges that require new tools and methods of analysis. This course applies sophisticated digital tools to an age-old concern: the impact of environmental change and extreme weather on agricultural productivity. In this hands-on introduction to data analysis and visualization with real-world data, students acquire the tools to understand the impacts of environmental change and more.
Restricted to students in University Honors who matriculated infall 2020 or later. This course is the required I-Series class in the Information and Power cluster. Information and Power courses will be offered through spring 2023.
HNUH268A
Arbitrating our Bodily Rights: Consent to Sex, Medical Treatment, Body Art, Organ Donation, and Research Participation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Both American law and conventional morality support the view that human beings have bodily rights - ones we can waive by giving another person our consent to do what would otherwise be a rights violation. Yet, debate about the sovereignty of an individual's body and the potential rights of others--including the state--over our bodies lies at the core of some of the most contentious issues facing us as a society. This class will investigate the thorny debates that pertain to consent in sexual relations, medicine and research, and bodily markets. What types threats, offers, or cognitive incapacities undermine true consent? How do we evaluate the moral or legal significance of bodily rights when they come into tension with the government's interest? After evaluating arguments, exploring distinctions, and using philosophical tools to arrive at reasoned conclusions about consent, students will learn to apply these conceptual tools to cases from fiction and current events.
Restricted to University Honors students matriculating in Fall 2020 and later.

This course is the required I-Series class in the Body Politics cluster. Body Politics courses will be offered through Spring 2023."
HNUH278A
The Research Behind Headlines on Words, Thought, and Behavior
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HESP214.
Credit only granted for: HNUH278A or HESP214.
How does the human mind use language? Type "Language Science News" into your Google search bar. Among the more than 3 billion hits, headlines like "What is love? It depends what language you speak" and "Science's English dominance hinders diversity" invite you to think about the impact of words on thought and behavior. These are stories about how humans acquire and use language, but they ultimately address big questions about how we experience knowledge itself. In a world of unprecedented access to science journalism, did you ever read a headline about human behavior and wonder: How do we know? This class takes up the elegant ways cognitive scientists design experiments to answer crucial questions about language and thought, brain and behavior, that have no intuitive answers. Students will dive deep into the media coverage of their favorite claims about what we know, debate the psychological science behind these claims, and develop transferable critical-thinking skills in the process.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 and later.

This course is the required I-Series course in the "In A Word" thematic cluster. Other courses in the "In A Word" cluster will be offered through Spring 2023; and HNUH278A will be offered through Fall 2023.
HNUH288A
Welcome to the Party: Race, Nightlife, and Identity in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
How does play shape our humanity and national identity? We often define people by the work that they do, whereas we tend to think of leisure and after work playfulness as a release from that identity. This course takes up a particular form of play--nightlife--to reckon with how it shapes what it means to be human and how it impacts nationhood, particularly around matters of race and oppression. Spanning from slavery to the present, this course examines how nightlife has been used to deny black people's humanity and been a vital site of playfulness, manifest as joy, resistance, self-making, and aesthetic innovation. Using performance studies to make sense of the world, our explorations will range from cakewalk dance competitions on plantations to queer night clubs. Once students better understand how nightlife is vital to the making and the unmaking of black people's humanity, they will grapple with play as a meaning-maker in their own lives and in our democracy.
Restricted to University Honors students matriculating in Fall 2020 and later.

This course is the required I-Series class in the Virtually Human cluster. Virtually Human courses will be offered through Spring 2023
INST
Information Studies
INST154
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Examines Apollo mission, one of the greatest engineering accomplishments of all time, in which Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. Since the mission, people have asked: if we can land on the moon, why can't we eliminate poverty? Why can't we cure cancer? Why can't we prevent global warming? Asks what were the social, political, financial, scientific, engineering, operational, and human aspects of the Apollo program that came together to make the moon landings possible?
INST155
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: INFM289I or INST155.
Formerly: INFM289I.
Introduces methods for analyzing and understanding how people use social media - social networking websites, blogging and microblogging, and other forms of online interaction and content generation - and their societal implications. Introduces students to the science and social science of network analysis. Through real world examples, including analysis of their own social networks, students develop skills for describing and understanding the patterns and usage of services like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and others.
JOUR
Journalism Department Site
JOUR281
Media Law and Ethics in the Digital Age
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR289E or JOUR281.
Formerly: JOUR289E.
Additional information: This course is intended for non-journalism majors.
Explores the First Amendment, libel, privacy, FOIA and copyright as they have evolved in the digital news age of bloggers, tweeters and citizen journalists. The course will cover fundamental legal and ethical concepts as well as practical application.
JOUR282
Beyond Facebook: How Social Media are Transforming Society, Culture, Business and Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR289F or JOUR282.
Formerly: JOUR289F.
Examining the rise of social media and their impact on culture, business, government, politics, journalism and society, this course provides students with a broad contextual understanding of the multidisciplinary impacts of social media such as Twitter, Facebook and similar Internet-based services.
JOUR283
Probing War: Investigative Narratives and American Conflicts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR283 or JOUR289J.
Formerly: JOUR289J.
Students will explore the realities of war through the work of journalists who pushed beyond the daily headlines, some risking life and limb, to challenge official versions and document uncomfortable realities about American conflicts.
JOUR284
Scandal: Exposing Corruption, Justice, and Vice in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR289P, JOUR284 or HONR239J.
Formerly: JOUR289P, HONR239J.
Students will examine the nature and meaning of scandals in society: how they are uncovered and constructed; why some forms of wrongdoing are considered scandalous but not others; how this definition has changed over time; and how scandals resonate in ways that reflect societal norms.
JOUR289I
Information 3.0: Exploring Technological Tools
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Students will expand their understanding of various digital information and the issues it raises, evaluate media research investigating how users interact with information for different purposes, analyze how diverse audiences seek, select, share and produce various types of digital information, and evaluate the ethics related to digital privacy and security.
KNES
Kinesiology Department Site
KNES225
Hoop Dreams: Black Masculinity and Sport
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: KNES289R OR KNES225.
Formerly: KNES289R.
Has sport disadvantaged African American males? This course critically examines sport as a site where notions of black masculinity are publicly debated, critiqued, challenged, celebrated, and also transformed. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores how sport has been invoked across the political and ideological spectrum to interrogate a number of issues impacting the life chances of young, African Americans males including educational attainment, poverty, social mobility, racism, cultural production, and notions of masculinity.
KNES226
The Cybernetic Human
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: KNES289W OR KNES226.
Formerly: KNES289W.
Can the profound and rapid technological advances experienced in the 21st century change what it means to be human or the nature of humanity? Emergent technologies, new materials, increased computer power, engineering innovations, and groundbreaking work in the sciences of cognition and action provide myriad opportunities for repairing and enhancing the human body and brain. Examines the ethical, social, and technological implications of an increasing synergism of technology and the body in sports and the arts, at work or home, rehabilitating the body and the brain, and society at large.
LARC
Landscape Architecture Department Site
LARC151
Urban Agriculture: Designing and Assessing Edible Landscapes
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Students will examine the growing development of urban agriculture and edible landscapes. Urban agriculture has seen a recent growth and interest in cities across the globe. From Paris to New York, from Baltimore to Detroit, urban agriculture is an emerging land use to address a variety of needs. Redevelopment, food deserts, community engagement and environmental justice are just some of the issues and topics that are connected to the recent growth of urban agriculture. This course will take a critical examination of urban agriculture's contribution to the food system, its input and outputs in the urban landscape, and the planning and design of urban agriculture and edible landscapes.
LING
Linguistics Department Site
LING272
Biophysics of Language
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Examines the nature of mental representation of language in the physiology of the mind/brain, how it evolved, how it emerges in learners' minds, and how it decays through injury and illness. Insights from linguistics, cognitive psychology, neuroscience, animal behavior, molecular biology, and biophysics are brought to bear on how an abstract systematic behavior can arise within an animal brain.
MLAW
MPower Undergraduate Law Programs
MLAW150
Law in a Just Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must be in the College Park Scholars - Justice and Legal Thought program.
An exploration of the theoretical questions relating to such fundamental questions of jurisprudence as "what is law?" and "how can law be deployed as both an enemy and ally of justice?
NFSC
Nutrition and Food Science Department Site
NFSC220
Diet: Is it a cause or a solution
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
If diet is a very straightforward topic; then why and how does this simple matter result in complicated health problems? Diet can provide a simple solution to numerous health issues. So, why do many people fail to follow this seemingly simple solution and still suffer from obesity and other diet-related diseases? Diet is a topic that most people know but few people understand. In addition, diet has become one of the most important lenses for looking at a variety of social, economic, and cultural issues. Since the concept of diet is continuum and has multifaceted aspects, we need to understand it in broad and multidisciplinary perspectives including social, cultural and economic aspects.
PHIL
Philosophy Department Site
PHIL203
The Rights and Wrongs of Killing People
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PHIL209J or PHIL203.
Formerly: PHIL209J.
Virtually everyone thinks it's permissible to kill people only in special circumstances. But why is killing usually wrong? Is it ever acceptable to kill an innocent human being intentionally? This course raises these and related questions and examines cases such as terrorism, suicide, abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, war. Except for a brief discussion of animals, all the controversies considered deal with killing and causing death to human beings.
PHIL205
Are Sports Ethical?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PHIL205, PHIL209G, or HONR229E.
Formerly: HONR229E.
Things happen routinely in sports that would seem morally unacceptable in other context: violence between the participants, attempts to trick the referee, fans hoping that some players would do embarrassingly badly, spectators feeling anger towards whole nations. Nonetheless, all of this may seem reasonable and even justifiable within a sporting context. This course will investigate the ethical structure of sports, and what it tells us about the ethics of everyday life. Philosophy will provide the primary disciplinary context, but we will also think about sociological, legal and anthropological perspectives on sports. Issues will include the nature of sportsmanship, what types of violence in sports are acceptable, drug use in sports, what it means to be a fan (for example, asking why loyalty to your team is valuable) and how our view of sports interacts with our view of nations. By the end of the course you should have gained familiarity with a variety of ethical concepts and a sensitivity to the ethical issues in sports. You should also find that by thinking about morality in the context of sports, you will look at larger ethical issues in new ways.
PHSC
Public Health Science
PHSC430
Public Health in the City: Perspectives on Health in the Urban Environment
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in BSCI202 and MIEH300.
Restriction: Must be in Public Health Science program; and junior standing or higher.
Credit only granted for: PHSC430 or SPHL498G.
Formerly: SPHL498G.
Exposure to issues related to city habitation and the health of the public, including how the urban environment impacts the lives and health of city dwellers, including discussion of the social determinants of health. Students are encouraged to think about urban health and policy, and to question the current state of urban public health. Issues of race, class, and equality will be discussed throughout the course as they relate to each of these topics.
PLCY
Public Policy
PLCY101
Great Thinkers on Public Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Great ideas in public policy, such as equality, efficiency, sovereignty, liberty, bureaucracy, democracy and security are explored through the lens of great thinkers. An introduction to the intellectual foundations of public policy, from ancient theories on collective public action through the more contemporary development of public policy as a discipline. This may start as early as the ancient Greek philosophers and their views on public action through contemporary classics of public policy. At the conclusion of the course, students will have read classic works in the field and will master the key themes that have dominated the intellectual debates about public policy over its history. Emphasis will be on the interdisciplinary foundations of public policy, through examining core disciplinary contributions from economics, political science, management, philosophy, and other relevant disciplines.
PLCY201
Public Leaders and Active Citizens
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PLCY201 or PUAF201.
Formerly: PUAF201.
Aims to inspire, teach and engage students in the theory and practice of public leadership from the local to the national to the global level. Students will learn and apply diverse approaches to leadership in a multicultural society while developing an understanding of key frameworks and practices necessary to foster collective action across private, public, and nonprofit sectors. This course will allow students to become informed citizens able to reason critically and persuasively about public matters Students will also explore and assess their own personal values, beliefs, and purpose as they develop their leadership potential.
PLCY380
Innovation and Social Change: Do Good Now
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ARHU380, BSOS388B, PLCY388D, or PLCY380.
Formerly: PLCY388D.
Introduces students to the concept of social innovation while exploring the many mechanisms for achieving social impact. It is team-based, highly interactive and dynamic, and provides an opportunity for students to generate solutions to a wide range of problems facing many communities today. Deepens the students understanding of entrepreneurship and innovation practices by guiding them through the creation and implementation process as applied to a project idea of their choice.
PLSC
Plant Sciences
PLSC250
Lawns in the Landscape: Environmental Hero or Villain?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Cross-listed with ENSP250.
Credit only granted for: ENSP250 or PLSC250.
Examination of the lawn as an element in the anthropogenic landscape and its influence on global warming, regional air and water quality, ecological diversity, mammalian pesticide exposure and consumptive water use. Demographic and socioeconomic factors are examined in the context of being predictors of landscape aesthetic desires and lawn management behaviors. Policies that incentivize lawn alternatives or changes in lawn management behavior are discussed.
PSYC
Psychology Department Site
PSYC234
Living the Good Life: The Psychology of Happiness
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PSYC234 or PSYC289D.
Formerly: PSYC289D.
What are the secrets to living a happy life? Can happiness be found within the context of war, a depressed economy, violence and other major stressors? Are some people born happier than others? This course will teach you the scientific process that psychologists use to study happiness (and related emotional variables) and give you the opportunity to practice applying that process in a number of ways. You will learn how we (a) gather and critically evaluate research findings in the existing literature, (b) integrate those findings into coherent and testable theories, (c) design and conduct valid scientific research that tests those theories and extends our knowledge, and (d) effectively communicate our theories and findings to a wide range of audiences. The result of the process is a more accurate and objective understanding of happiness, and that is what prepares you to apply your scientific understanding to explain and influence a wide range of outcomes.
RELS
Religious Studies
RELS271
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVCC, SCIS
Credit only granted for: RELS289I or RELS271.
Formerly: RELS289I.
Draws upon examples from a wide variety of religious traditions to explore the question of what religion is and how to best understand it. Engagement with diverse approaches to religion including phenomenology and the study of "the sacred"; sociology and the study of religious communities; and questions of religious experience, ritual, and identity formation.
RELS289C
Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Medieval Spain: Tolerance, Oppression, and the Problematic Past
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HIST289A.
Credit only granted for: HIST289A or RELS289C.
For 800 years, medieval Spain was home to one of the most religiously diverse societies in European history. Despite frequent hostilities, the interactions of Spanish Jews, Christians, and Muslims produced a flowering of science, theology, and literature in an often remarkably tolerant climate. Students will learn how medieval Spanish people themselves experienced interreligious contact and conflict. They will also discover the modern pressures, prejudices, and ideals that have shaped historians interpretations of medieval Spain.
SLLC
School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures Department Site
SLLC286
Living the Good Life: Chinese Philosophy in the Modern World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Additional information: Taught in English.
Confucius, Mencius, Zhuangzi and other Chinese thinkers who lived more than 2,000 years ago would argue that the contemporary Western emphasis on self-discovery (Find yourself) and self-acceptance has led you astray. See what they have to say and discuss what relevance it has for the modern world as we study how early Chinese thinkers wrestled with questions of existence, morality, and governance. No previous knowledge of Chinese philosophy and history will be assumed and no prerequisites are required. We will discuss ideas that are both historical and relevant to students' lives. What is "the Way"? How do we cultivate spontaneity? Is there a stable self? How can we be more alive? These are questions important for ancient kings but also for UMD students choosing a major, or wondering how ARHU can benefit them.
SOCY
Sociology Department Site
SOCY200
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
A comparative, historical, interdisciplinary study of human socieities that focuses on the main components of human societies, how they are organized, how they change, and how they come to shape our collective social existence.
SOCY224
Why are We Still Talking About Race?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Exploration of the major debates and assumptions that construct individual perceptions of what race is and how race matters. Sociological and sub-cultural theories will give students a historical and present day frame with which to view race and ethnic relations in the twenty-first century.
SPHL
Public Health Department Site
SPHL291
Does Science Support Nontraditional Healing Practices?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Recommended: Successful completion of English composition course.
Does yoga improve the health of wounded warriors and/or breast cancer survivors? Can mindfulness enhance your business success and family relationships, or is it social media hype? Do you know what reflexology is, and does it help reduce your personal stress level? Increasing numbers of people are using nutritional supplements, meditation, yoga and other forms of exercise, acupuncture and experiences in nature to reduce stress levels and improve overall health and well-being. In the media, scientists to celebrities have alternately endorsed or rejected claims about how these and other nontraditional health practices benefit health and well-being. Students will sample some of these nontraditional health practices and explore whether these practices can enhance their own well-being. General scientific methods for health research will be introduced and students will use this knowledge to evaluate the existing scientific research on these practices. Students will also evaluate whether popular and media translation of scientific research on these practices is fact-based.
THET
Theatre Department Site
THET251
Broadway Mashup: Remixing America Through Musical Theater
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Interrogate musical theater's political history, investigating how this uniquely American genre uses narrative, song, and dance to weave critical differences across race, ethnicity, immigration status, religion, gender, sexuality, and ability into our national fabric.
TLPL
Teaching and Learning, Policy and Leadership Department Site
TLPL202
Good Stories: Teaching Narratives for Peace and Justice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: EDCI246 or TLPL202.
Formerly: EDCI246.
Through the study and use of oral storytelling and digital technologies explore qualities and characteristics of what makes a good story and how stories can be used to advance peace and justice on both individual and social levels.
TLPL288R
Critical Race Counter-storytelling
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVCC, SCIS
Repeatable to 3 credits.
Additional information: This is a storytelling writing/composing workshop. Students will engage regularly in small writing groups.
This is a storytelling course where students explore what it means to compose counternarratives through critical race lenses. How might we compose stories that challenge dominant narratives about people and communities who are often subjected to one-sided, deficit portrayals? How do we interrogate the white gaze and the white imagination as represented in popular media, literary works, and academic writing, particularly about communities of color?
WGSS
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
WGSS290
Bodies in Contention
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: WMST298D or WGSS290.
Formerly: WMST298D.
Explores the contributions of feminist scholarship in framing and resolving contemporary controversies concerning gendered bodies. It includes the ways in which knowledge about the human body has been shaped by cultural ideas of gender, race, sexuality and ability.
WGSS298N
The Politics of Sexuality in America: A Historical Approach
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HIST289N.
Credit only granted for: HIST289N or WGSS298N.
Why do particular issues about sexuality hold such an important place in American political debates? What animates these controversies and what can a historical perspective on these issues add to our understanding of modern sexual politics? This class explores the historical sexual politics that undergird contemporary debates concerning sexuality in America. It focuses on topics that garner significant public attention - Reproductive rights - LGBTQ rights - Sexting - and explores the histories that undergird Americans disagreements.