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Courses - Spring 2024
AASP
African American Studies Department Site
Open Seats as of
02/28/2024 at 10:30 PM
AASP200
African Civilization
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
A survey of African civilizations from 4500 B.C. to present. Analysis of traditional social systems. Discussion of the impact of European colonization on these civilizations. Analysis of the influence of traditional African social systems on modern African institutions as well as discussion of contemporary processes of Africanization.
AASP298L
African-American Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: ENGL234.
Credit only granted for: ENGL234 or AASP298L.
An exploration of the stories black authors tell about themselves, their communities, and the nation as informed by time and place, gender, sexuality, and class. African American perspective themes such as art, childhood, sexuality, marriage, alienation and mortality, as well as representations of slavery, Reconstruction, racial violence and the Nadir, legalized racism and segregation, black patriotism and black ex-patriots, the optimism of integration, and the prospects of a post-racial America.
Cross-listed with ENGL234. Credit granted for AASP298L or ENGL234.
AAST
Asian American Studies Department Site
AAST233
Introduction to Asian American Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: ENGL233.
Credit only granted for: ENGL233 or AAST233.
A survey of Asian American literature with an emphasis on recurrent themes and historical context.
AAST440
South Asian American Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: AAST440 or AAST498W.
Formerly: AAST498W.
Examines writing by South Asian American authors and authors writing about South Asian American issues. It explores major South Asian diaspora themes, considering how migration, war, the events of 9/11, global capitalism, and the changing socio-political and racial scene have affected South Asians in the United States. We will use a transnational approach to consider how writers and filmmakers explore gender, class, religious, caste, and other differences amongst South Asian Americans. We will also examine the place of South Asian Americans in relation to other Asian American populations. We will consider how South Asian American texts disrupt traditional literary classifications based on national identities by reflecting the complex global conditions, imperialistic and capitalistic expansion, and interconnectedness of peoples, nations, and cultures that have transformed American literature and conceptions of American identity.
AMST
American Studies Department Site
AMST101
Introduction American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: AMST101 or AMST201.
Formerly: AMST201.
Introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of American Studies by examining concepts such as culture, identity, cultural practices, and globalization, as well as theories underlying these concepts. Engages key themes, especially constructions of difference and identity, cultures of everyday life, and America and the world.
AMST203
Popular Culture in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
An introduction to American popular culture, its historical development, and its role as a reflection of and influence on our culture and society.
AMST205
Material Aspects of American Life
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Historical survey of American material culture. Ways of describing and interpreting accumulated material evidence (e.g., buildings, town plans) introduced by stressing relationship between artifact and culture.
AMST213
Heroes and Villains in American Film
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: CINE282.
Credit only granted for: AMST213, HONR219F, CINE282 or FILM298V.
Formerly: HONR219F, FILM298V.
We will examine the complex, changing, and ever-present representations of heroes and villains in American film. Beginning with a foundational understanding of how heroes and, conversely, villains have been defined through classic Hollywood film, we will explore how these definitions have shifted throughout the 20th and 21st century in various narrative genres, including westerns, war films, film noir, fantasy, science fiction, and, of course, superhero movies. In particular, we will be focusing on how the hero and villain maintain or disrupt specific cultural ideologies concerning race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and ability. This course will examine how these various ideologies have evolved throughout the 20th and 21st century, impacting the ways in which heroes and villains are both represented in American film and perceived by diverse audiences. Finally, we will examine our own complicated and sometimes troubling identification with these heroes, even when they might stand in stark contrast to our cultural values and identities.
AMST298Q
U.S. Latinx Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: ENGL235.
Credit only granted for: ENGL235 or AMST298Q.
Examines the poetry, prose, and theater of Latinx communities in the United States from their origins in the Spanish colonization of North America to their ongoing development in the 21st century. Considers how authors use literary form to gain insight into human experience, including mortality, religious belief, gender and sexuality, war and peace, family, language use, scientific inquiry, cultural tradition, ecology, and labor. Also studies how Latinx literary traditions have shaped and been shaped by broader currents in American literature, as well as what connections exist between Latinx literature and social and artistic developments in other parts of the world, particularly Latin America and the Caribbean. Authors may include Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, Eulalia Perez, Juan Nepomuceno Seguin, Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Jose Marti, Arthur A. Schomburg, Jesus Colon, Julia de Burgos, Cesar Chavez, Ariel Dorfman, Gloria Anzaldua, Junot Diaz, and Cristina Garcia.
AMST418K
Film and American Landscape
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Explores how representations of various geographic spaces in American film impact our understanding of community, identity, and place. In particular, we will think about how these spaces are culturally produced and changeable rather than static. The same space can hold diverse meanings for various groups of people and how such a space is represented in film is often wrapped up with issues of power, the reinforcement of stereotypes, and the creation of self/other dichotomies. By analyzing a variety of narrative, documentary, major studio, and independent films, we will seek to understand how American films' representations of rural, urban, and suburban spaces both reflect, contradict, and often influence our lived experiences of these spaces; in other words, this course will examine how the "reel" intersects with the "real".
ARCH
Architecture Department Site
ARCH170
Design Thinking and Architecture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Examines conceptual, perceptual, behavioral, and technical aspects of the built environment, and methods of analysis, problem-solving, and design implementation.
ARCH225
History of World Architecture I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Pre-1500 World Architecture survey course - History of Architecture structured to develop critical thinking and visually literacy with regard to the worldwide legacy of design thinking and cultural production through architecture
ARHU
Arts and Humanities Department Site
ARHU230
(Perm Req)
Introduction to Humanities, Health, and Medicine
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Permission of ARHU-English Department.
Cross-listed with: ENGL254, HIST219N, WGSS230.
Credit only granted for: ARHU230 , ENGL289C, ENGL254, ARHU298A, HIST219N, or WGSS230.
An overview of the historical, cultural, ethical, and spiritual dimensions of medicine, human health, disease, and death from the points of view of various humanistic disciplines.
ARHU275
Scriptwriting for Theater, Film, and Television
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Cross-listed with: ENGL275.
Credit only granted for: ENGL275 or ARHU275.
Introduction to the theory and practice of scriptwriting with an opportunity to read, view, evaluate, write, and revise texts meant to be performed. Students will practice writing for the stage, film, and television and also examine selected scripts, performances, and film and television clips as models for their own creative work. Students will complete frequent writing exercises, participate in workshops, and learn to apply scholarship to the analysis and critique of scripts.
ARHU380
Arts & Humanities in Social Innovation, Change, and Justice: Do Good Now
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: JWST319P.
Credit only granted for: ARHU380, BSOS388B, JWST319P, or PLCY388D.
The course serves as the core course for the Arts-and-Humanities track in PLCY's minor in "Nonprofit Leadership and Social Innovation." Students will be introduced to the role that the Arts and Humanities can play in social innovation and social change, while exploring various mechanisms for achieving impact with a focus on advancing social justice, equity and systems change. This course deepens understandings of nonprofit leadership, entrepreneurship and social innovation by guiding students through the creation and implementation of social change projects and ventures of their choice.
Cross-listed with JWST319P. For Spring 2023: Credit granted only for JWST319P, ARHU380, BSOS388B, or PLCY388D.
ARTH
Art History & Archaeology Department Site
ARTH200
Art and Society in Ancient and Medieval Europe and the Mediterranean
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Examines the material culture and visual expressions of Mediterranean and European societies from early times until ca. 1300 CE, emphasizing the political, social, and religious context of the works studied, the relationships of the works to the societies that created them, and the interrelationship of these societies.
ARTH260
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Can art effect social change? How may we use the history of radical and avant-garde art to inform present-day movements and models of artistic and creative activism? This course explores the modern and contemporary history of political art and arts activism on local, national, and global scales.
ARTH261
Monuments, Monumentality, and the Art of Memorial
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Why do societies create monuments? And why do they preserve and destroy, change and remove them? How do monuments embody cultural values, shape historical narratives, and become sites of mourning and memory? This course investigates the political and cultural work of monuments across time and space, from the ancient world to European empires to the contemporary United States. The issues we consider include intercultural exchange and religious contexts, race and representation, and appropriation and iconoclasm.
ARTH292
Discovering Japan: How the Arts Shaped a Nation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Explores the origins and creation of Japan from ancient to contemporary times through East Asian and European exchange. Acquaints students with painting, sculpture, architecture, ceramics, gardens, and other art forms in relation to the various cultural contexts within which they were produced and used.
ARTH301
Aegean Art and Archaeology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Sites and monuments of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor arts of Crete, the Cycladic islands, and the Greek mainland from the earliest times to the downfall of the Mycenaean empire.
ARTH324
Leonardo's World: Art and Experience in Renaissance Italy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Painting, sculpture, architecture, and the decorative arts of the sixteenth century in Italy.
ARTH361
American Art from Civil War to Civil Rights
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Explores diverse artistic movements and makers in the United States, beginning at the end of the Civil War in 1865 and concluding with the art of Civil Rights era in the 20th century. We will ask how the visual arts construct and challenge formations of race, class, gender, and citizenship in the context of political transformations and social movements over a century of US history. This course emphasizes the practice of close looking as we encounter works art across a range of media--photography, painting, sculpture, film, material culture, performance art and public art.
ARTH391
Transnational Chinese Cinema
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: CINE335.
Credit only granted for: ARTH391 or CINE335.
Chinese cinema has made a big impact on contemporary world film culture. This course will introduce students to the films directed by some of the most representative filmmakers working in different geopolitical locations (mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong) and the Chinese diaspora. The films of these directors, in a spectrum of genres, themes, and styles, have inspired global scholarship, not only in visual culture and cinema, but also in the study of women's issues, gender and ethnic studies, as well as the fields of adaptation and intermedia studies. Students will explore these films in their socio-historical and artistic contexts, considering the influences and innovations that have shaped them and analyzing their reception by audiences and critics. After reading about the films they view, and participating in class discussions, students will be ready to complete their analytical written assignments, for which they will critically examine the films by applying key concepts such as gender, sexuality, race, gaze, style, representation, power, diaspora, etc.
ARTT
Art Studio Department Site
ARTT150
Introduction to Art Theory
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Fundamental concepts of global, philosophic, and critical art theory examined through various historic and contemporary texts, and the analysis of works of art.
CHIN
Chinese Department Site
CHIN205
(Perm Req)
Intermediate Chinese - Accelerated Track
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: Must have attained appropriate Foreign Language Placement Test (FLPT) score.
Restriction: Must not have completed CHIN201, CHIN203, CHIN202, or CHIN204.
Accelerated instruction in Mandarin Chinese at the intermediate level for students with prior Chinese language background, either through home use or formal instruction.
CHIN307
Linguistic Landscape of China
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: Must have completed CHIN204 or above; or permission of Chinese Program Advisor.
Comprehensive introduction to Chinese and other major languages in the Sino-Tibetan, Altaic, Austroasiatic, and Austronesian families, all of which are spoken in China. Taught in English.
CHIN315
Modern Chinese Literature in Translation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Major works of fiction and drama from 1920 to the present read in the context of social and literary change. Emphasis on western and traditional Chinese influences on the writers and their works. No knowledge of Chinese required.
CINE
Cinema and Media Studies
CINE245
Film Form and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: ENGL245.
Credit only granted for: ENGL245, CINE245 or FILM245.
Formerly: FILM245.
Introduction to film as art form and how films create meaning. Basic film terminology; fundamental principles of film form, film narrative, and film history. Examination of film technique and style over past one hundred years. Social and economic functions of film within broader institutional, economic, and cultural contexts.
CINE280
Film Art in a Global Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: CMLT280.
Credit only granted for: CINE280, FILM298D or CMLT280.
Formerly: FILM298D.
Comparative study of a variety of film traditions from around the world, including cinema from Hollywood, Europe, Asia and developing countries, with a stress on different cultural contexts for film-making and viewing.
CINE282
Heroes and Villains in American Film
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AMST213.
Credit only granted for: AMST213, HONR219F, CINE282 or FILM298V.
Formerly: HONR219F, FILM298V.
We will examine the complex, changing, and ever-present representations of heroes and villains in American film. Beginning with a foundational understanding of how heroes and, conversely, villains have been defined through classic Hollywood film, we will explore how these definitions have shifted throughout the 20th and 21st century in various narrative genres, including westerns, war films, film noir, fantasy, science fiction, and, of course, superhero movies. In particular, we will be focusing on how the hero and villain maintain or disrupt specific cultural ideologies concerning race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and ability. This course will examine how these various ideologies have evolved throughout the 20th and 21st century, impacting the ways in which heroes and villains are both represented in American film and perceived by diverse audiences. Finally, we will examine our own complicated and sometimes troubling identification with these heroes, even when they might stand in stark contrast to our cultural values and identities.
CINE335
Transnational Chinese Cinema
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: ARTH391.
Credit only granted for: ARTH391 or CINE335.
Chinese cinema has made a big impact on contemporary world film culture. This course will introduce students to the films directed by some of the most representative filmmakers working in different geopolitical locations (mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong) and the Chinese diaspora. The films of these directors, in a spectrum of genres, themes, and styles, have inspired global scholarship, not only in visual culture and cinema, but also in the study of women's issues, gender and ethnic studies, as well as the fields of adaptation and intermedia studies. Students will explore these films in their socio-historical and artistic contexts, considering the influences and innovations that have shaped them and analyzing their reception by audiences and critics. After reading about the films they view, and participating in class discussions, students will be ready to complete their analytical written assignments, for which they will critically examine the films by applying key concepts such as gender, sexuality, race, gaze, style, representation, power, diaspora, etc.
CLAS
Classics Department Site
CLAS170
Ancient Myths and Modern Lives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Cross-listed with: RELS170.
Credit only granted for: CLAS170 or RELS170.
Additional information: This course cannot be taken for language credit.
What are myths and why do we tell them? What powers do myths have? We will tackle these questions by looking at the enduring and fascinating myths from ancient Greece and Rome. In addition to studying how they shaped ancient societies, we will also look at their modern influence and reflect upon the power that myths still hold in our contemporary world. Taught in English.
CLAS180
Discovering the World of Ancient Greece
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU
An exploration of the cultural traits and developments of ancient Greek civilization and its forerunners, from the Bronze Age Mycenaeans and Minoans, through the rise of the classical Greek city-states, to the expansion of Greek cultural influence in the wake of the conquests of Alexander the Great. Drawing upon the evidence of the archaeological remains as well as ancient historical and literary documents, students gain a basic familiarity with the principal monuments and artifacts of classical Greek civilization, the various institutions and values that characterized the Greeks, and the significant historical events that transformed the culture over the course of antiquity.
CLAS276
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: CLAS276 or CLAS289A.
Formerly: CLAS289A.
America, from its very origins as an independent nation, saw itself as the new Rome: its system of government is built on Roman precedents, its national buildings look as if they came from the Roman Forum, and its leisure activities take us to stadiums modeled on the Colosseum. America's relationship to Rome, however, raises its greatest anxiety: will America fall as Rome did? In 1776, the year of American independence, Edward Gibbon published his History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire; America has been thinking about the trajectory of its history alongside Rome's from the very beginning.
CLAS316
Classical Antiquity and the Cinema
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: CINE316.
Credit only granted for: CLAS316 or CINE316.
Many films, while rooted in the time and place in which they were created, draw upon themes and stories from ancient Greek and Roman literature. While the filmmakers' understandings of modern social forces affect their representations of the ancient world, the ancient works also shape the ways in which filmmakers tell their stories. Film criticism and close reading complement each other in the analysis of films and the ancient works on which they are based.
CLAS320
Women in Classical Antiquity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: HIST328W, WGSS320.
Credit only granted for: CLAS320, WMST320, WGSS320 or HIST328W.
A study of women's image and reality in ancient Greek and Roman societies through an examination of literary, linguistic, historical, legal, and artistic evidence; special emphasis in women's role in the family, views of female sexuality, and the place of women in creative art. Readings in primary sources in translation and modern critical writings.
CLAS322
Roman Freedpersons
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
The literary remains of three Roman freedpersons--the editor and biographer Tiro (c. 80-4 BCE), the poet and fabulist Phaedrus (fl. 1st cen. CE), and the philosopher Epictetus (c. 55-135 CE)--give us a rare glimpse into the internal experience of persons enslaved and emancipated by Roman elites. To contextualize these experiences, we study the legal basis of Roman slavery, epigraphic self-representations, and stereotyping representations of freedpersons by free authors. We also read our authors against comparable works by freeborn analogues--the senator Cicero, the poet Horace, and the philosopher Seneca--to test the boundaries of how the identity of libertus ("freedman") affected and failed to affect our authors' literary aims. To deepen our study of how historical conditions shape the creation of freed authorship and the transmission of freed authors, we also read, and consider the conditions surrounding the publication of, American freedpersons' literature.
CLAS340
Ancient Slavery and its American Impacts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: HIST339J.
Credit only granted for: CLAS340 or HIST339J.
Interrogates how slavery permeated the ancient Mediterranean societies of Greece and Rome. We will pay particular attention to how hierarchical inequalities are institutionalized, experienced, and represented and to how different marginalized and dominant groups interacted. Enslaved persons performed necessary labor in Greece and Rome and their work was essential for the formation of ancient society in agriculture, mining, domestic spaces, literature, finance, and government. Studying ancient slavery offers a chance to examine Greece and Rome from the bottom up, parsing the scant literary and material evidence for the lives and struggles of enslaved persons. We will practice several different approaches in order to tease out the systematic, economic, political, and personal effects of slavery in the ancient world. The United States of America was also founded as a slave society, and discussions of slavery in the Americas often look back to the ancient Mediterranean. The course will therefore conclude with a unit on how enslavers and abolitionists in the United States utilized and responded to slavery in antiquity.
CMLT
Comparative Literature Department Site
CMLT235
Black Diaspora Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Examination of key works by writers of the African Diaspora. Relationship among black people across multiple geographic spaces; Africa, the Caribbean, the United States, Europe, Latin America, and Asia. Specific historical, cultural, and literary contexts; themes such as gender, sexuality, migration, slavery, freedom, and equality. Readings may include literary texts (fiction, poetry, drama), music and film. All readings in English, but drawn from multiple languages of the black diaspora, including English, Spanish, French and Portuguese.
CMLT270
Global Literature and Social Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Comparative study of literature through selected literary works from several non-Western cultures, viewed cross-culturally in light of particular social, political, and economic perspectives.
CMLT275
World Literature by Women
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: WGSS275.
Credit only granted for: WMST275, CMLT275 or WGSS275.
Formerly: WMST275.
Comparative study of selected works by women writers of several countries, exploring points of intersection and divergence in women's literary representations.
CMLT277
Literatures of the Americas
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Comparative study of several North, South, and Central American cultures with a focus on the specificities, similarities, and divergences of their literary and cultural texts.
CMLT280
Film Art in a Global Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: CINE280.
Credit only granted for: CINE280, FILM298D or CMLT280.
Formerly: FILM298D.
Comparative study of a variety of film traditions from around the world, including cinema from Hollywood, Europe, Asia and developing countries, with a stress on different cultural contexts for film-making and viewing.
Cross-listed with FILM298D. Credit only granted for: CMLT280 or FILM298D.
COMM
Communication Department Site
COMM324
Communication and Gender
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Explores how communication shapes constructions of gender, sex, sexuality and other identity markers. Topics include issues of oppression, identity, and power and social, political, and economic situations and examines how these issues impact our daily lives.
EDSP
Education, Special Department Site
EDSP416
Reading and Writing Instruction in Special Education I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Must be in Special Education program.
Jointly offered with EDSP616.
Credit only granted for: EDSP416 or EDSP616.
Assessment and instruction of reading and writing skills for students in special education.
ENEE
Electrical & Computer Engineering Department Site
ENEE200
Technology and Consequences: Engineering, Ethics, and Humanity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENEE200 or ENES200.
What makes a technology socially responsible? At UMD, the Fearless Ideas campaign asks us to aim our enthusiasm for technology at big real problems. At the same time, we are coming to appreciate the increasingly complex nature of technological systems as they become integrated into all forms of infrastructure, we realize they may be unpredictable, interdependent on social and biological systems, and have unintended consequences. In this midst of this complexity, people make decisions with far reaching impacts. How then do we follow our passion for technology and innovation but also stay skeptical in a way that allows us to consider the potential and shortcomings of technology? Designed for both engineering and non-engineering students wishing to explore and assess the impact of engineering technology on society and the role of society in generating that technology.
Non-majors should register for ENES200 or choose the holdfile option. Department will release available seats to students in the holdfile after the last day of Early Registration for freshmen.
ENES
Engineering Science
ENES200
Technology and Consequences: Engineering, Ethics and Humanity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENEE200 or ENES200.
What makes a technology socially responsible? At UMD, the Fearless Ideas campaign asks us to aim our enthusiasm for technology at big real problems. At the same time, we are coming to appreciate the increasingly complex nature of technological systems as they become integrated into all forms of infrastructure, we realize they may be unpredictable, interdependent on social and biological systems, and have unintended consequences. In this midst of this complexity, people make decisions with far reaching impacts. How then do we follow our passion for technology and innovation but also stay skeptical in a way that allows us to consider the potential and shortcomings of technology? Designed for both engineering and non-engineering students wishing to explore and assess the impact of engineering technology on society and the role of society in generating that technology.
ENGL
English Department Site
ENGL125
Why Poetry Matters
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Poetry is most often understood as self-expression; it's also communal expression, and cultural expression; it's also a particular kind of construction made out of language. Explore the art form called poetry, including its formal properties, its conventions, and its legacy of experimentation. What role does poetry play in how we think about the human condition; what constitutes knowledge and wisdom, interior subjectivity and collective identity; and how shall this knowledge be used in confronting new challenges and the perennial questions: how to live with oneself, and as oneself; in time, and with others; here, where we reside; and elsewhere, where we imagine ourselves going. This is a hands-on course in reading and practicing the art of poetry, including short critical and creative writing exercises.
ENGL142
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENGL142 or ENGL289M.
Formerly: ENGL289M.
What does the literature of Maryland teach us about our state's past, present, and future? "Literary Maryland" explores this question by taking students on a tour of our state's prose, poetry, and drama from colonization to the present. In addition to reading fascinating writing and visiting interesting places, you'll learn how the Chesapeake was formed; why nobody sings the entire national anthem; and what led Baltimore to name its football team after a poem written by a Virginian.
ENGL143
Visualizing Knowledge: From Data to Images
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Explores how technology and people shape our current age of information through the various forms of visually representing information. Visualizations do not show us things that are evident--visualizations make things evident. We will thus examine the history of visualization practices, the theories of image-making that guide their production, and the current state of the art. Students will engage critically with a wide range of information visualization practices to gain an understanding of the work involved in producing them and their histories. Students will also seek out contemporary visualizations, interact with the practitioners who produce them, and produce their own visualization as a response or critique.
ENGL222
American Literature(s)
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Explore American literary traditions in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts, ranging from colonization to the Civil Rights Movement and beyond. Genres examined in this course might include lyric poems, travel narratives, gothic short fiction, slave narratives, and science fiction. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing, while attending to the place of race, class, gender, and sexuality in American literary culture. Authors may include Phillis Wheatley, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Frederick Douglass, Gertrude Stein, F. Scott Fitzgerald, James Baldwin, and Toni Morrison, among others.
ENGL233
Introduction to Asian American Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AAST233.
Credit only granted for: ENGL233 or AAST233.
A survey of Asian American literature with an emphasis on recurrent themes and historical context.
ENGL234
African-American Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AASP298L.
Credit only granted for: ENGL234 or AASP298L.
An exploration of the stories black authors tell about themselves, their communities, and the nation as informed by time and place, gender, sexuality, and class. African American perspective themes such as art, childhood, sexuality, marriage, alienation and mortality, as well as representations of slavery, Reconstruction, racial violence and the Nadir, legalized racism and segregation, black patriotism and black ex-patriots, the optimism of integration, and the prospects of a post-racial America.
Cross-listed with AASP298L. Credit granted for AASP298L or ENGL234.
ENGL235
U.S. Latinx Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AMST298Q.
Credit only granted for: ENGL235 or AMST298Q.
Examines the poetry, prose, and theater of Latinx communities in the United States from their origins in the Spanish colonization of North America to their ongoing development in the 21st century. Considers how authors use literary form to gain insight into human experience, including mortality, religious belief, gender and sexuality, war and peace, family, language use, scientific inquiry, cultural tradition, ecology, and labor. Also studies how Latinx literary traditions have shaped and been shaped by broader currents in American literature, as well as what connections exist between Latinx literature and social and artistic developments in other parts of the world, particularly Latin America and the Caribbean. Authors may include Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, Eulalia Perez, Juan Nepomuceno Seguin, Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Jose Marti, Arthur A. Schomburg, Jesus Colon, Julia de Burgos, Cesar Chavez, Ariel Dorfman, Gloria Anzaldua, Junot Diaz, and Cristina Garcia.
Cross-listed with AMST298Q. Credit granted for ENGL235 or AMST298Q.
ENGL241
What the Novel Does
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
An exploration of what the novel does that cannot be done by film, by television, by cell-phone screens, by any stream of images, or by textual excerpts pulled up for a quick read. The different ways of the novel, with particular focus on the process of thinking and the developed consciousness. The novel as a machine to think with and an irreplaceable model of complex human thought. Study of how thought is presented in radically different ways in novels that cross lines of class, gender, chronology, and nationality.
ENGL243
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
An exploration of arguably the most complex, profound, and ubiquitous expression of human experience. Study through close reading of significant forms and conventions of Western poetic tradition. Poetry's roots in oral and folk traditions and connections to popular song forms.
ENGL245
Film Form and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: CINE245.
Credit only granted for: ENGL245, CINE245 or FILM245.
Formerly: FILM245.
Introduction to film as art form and how films create meaning. Basic film terminology; fundamental principles of film form, film narrative, and film history. Examination of film technique and style over past one hundred years. Social and economic functions of film within broader institutional, economic, and cultural contexts.
ENGL246
Introduction to the Short Story
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
A survey of the genre, with a focus on significant elements, such as plot, character, description, style, and theme. Readings will be drawn from a range of cultures and communities.
ENGL250
Reading Women Writing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: WGSS255.
Credit only granted for: ENGL250, WMST255 or WGSS255.
Formerly: WMST255.
Explores literary and cultural expressions by women and their receptions within a range of historical periods and genres. Topics such as what does a woman need in order to write, what role does gender play in the production, consumption, and interpretation of texts, and to what extent do women comprise a distinct literary subculture. Interpretation of texts will be guided by feminist and gender theory, ways of reading that have emerged as important to literary studies over the last four decades.
ENGL255
Literature of Science and Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Examines science and technology through the lens of British and American literature, primarily between 1800 and the present. Readings from early natural and experimental philosophers of the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment. How literary works represent the ethics of science and technology; beneficial developments of science, and also heavy toll of industrialization. Writers studied may include Francis Bacon, Mary Shelley, Charles Darwin, H.G. Wells, Albert Einstein, Aldous Huxley, Richard Feynman, Philip K. Dick, Octavia Butler, Michael Frayn, and Tom Stoppard.
ENGL256
Fantasy Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
How fantasy employs alternate forms of representation, such as the fantastical, estranging, or impossible, which other genres would not allow. Through novels, short stories, graphic novels, and film, traces fantasy's roots in mythology and folklore, then explores how modern texts build upon or challenge these origins. Examination of literary strategies texts use to represent the world through speculative modes. How to distinguish fantasy from, and relate it to, other genres such as science fiction, horror, fairly tales, and magical realism. Fantasy's investment in world-building, history, tradition, and categories of identity such as race, class, and gender. How fantasy, as a genre, form, and world-view, is well-suited to our contemporary reality.
ENGL257
Children's Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Literature of the nineteenth through the twenty-first century concerned with, and written for, children and young adults. How such narratives speak to themes of changing social, religious, political, and personal identity. Through poetry, novels, graphic novels, and film, explores how children's tales encapsulate and reflect on human existence, while pushing boundaries of what constitutes "children's literature" and what exactly defines the "child." Considers questions of literary classification through investigation of political and religious issues, gender politics, animal rights, social justice, race, war, and what it means to "grow up."
ENGL265
LGBTQ+ Literatures and Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have completed LGBT265.
Cross-listed with: LGBT265.
Credit only granted for: ENGL265 or LGBT265.
A study of literary and cultural expressions of queer and trans identities, positionalities, and analytics through an exploration of literature, art, and media. We will examine historical and political power relations by considering the intersections of sexuality and gender with race, class, nation, and disability. Topics include the social construction and regulation of sexuality and gender, performance and performativity, intersectionality, and the relationship between aesthetic forms and queer/ trans subjectivity. Our interpretations will be informed by queer and trans theories.
ENGL275
Scriptwriting for Theater, Film, and Television
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Cross-listed with: ARHU275.
Credit only granted for: ENGL275 or ARHU275.
Introduction to the theory and practice of scriptwriting with an opportunity to read, view, evaluate, write, and revise texts meant to be performed. Students will practice writing for the stage, film, and television and also examine selected scripts, performances, and film and television clips as models for their own creative work. Students will complete frequent writing exercises, participate in workshops, and learn to apply scholarship to the analysis and critique of scripts.
ENGL290
Introduction to Digital Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Introductory course in digital studies. Surveys contemporary humanities work in digital technologies, including the web and social media and their historical antecedents. Explores design and making as analytical tools alongside reading and writing. Situates digital media within power and politics and develops critical awareness of how media shape society and ethics. Interdisciplinary approaches to creativity, analysis, and technology. While the course will include hands-on practice, no prior experience of programming, designing, or making required other than a willingness to experiment and play.
ENGL293
Writing in the Wireless World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Recommended: ENGL101.
A hands-on exploration of writing at the intersection of technology and rhetoric. Students will learn to read, analyze, and compose the kinds of multimodal documents--documents combining text, image, and sound--that constitute communication in our digital world.
ENGL294
Persuasion and Cleverness in Social Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Prerequisite: Must have satisfied Fundamental Studies Academic Writing requirement.
Exploration of various persuasive media encountered in daily life through the lens of rhetorical and critical theories. Principles of rhetoric and analysis of how persuasion functions across media. Invention of effective multimedia works appropriate to purpose, audience, and context. Concepts from cultural studies used to develop critical awareness about power and ideology and how they influence the way people produce and understand messages. By integration of technology, rhetoric, and cultural studies, students become more critically-rhetorically informed thinkers, authors, and audiences of arguments and culture in the digital age. Writing intensive course. No prior multimedia experience is expected.
ENGL295
Introduction to Digital Storytelling and Poetics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
What is the thread weaving through an animated visualization of economic data in a popular newspaper, an indie text-based videogame, a saucy twitter bot spitting out haikus, and an interactive digital essay? Storytelling--using whatever is at hand to communicate with audiences in evocative and connected ways. Combining technical and textual analysis with their own experiments in digital composition, students will learn to use new media techniques for the interpretation, creation, and dissemination of both critical and imaginative writing. From branching narratives to hypertext media and video games, to more recent developments in machine-generated poetry, XR, and embodied and location-based narrative, the methods and materials in this introductory course link creative expression and analysis of texts to contemporary conversations about social difference, representation, interface, and computation.
ENGL361
Recovering Oral Histories
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Prerequisite: Students must have completed one course in English, Latin American Studies, or Education.
Service-learning course that gives students an opportunity to develop writing, interviewing, and communication skills as they contribute to the work of a community organization. In the classroom, students will reflect on the process and do background research to understand the particular context of the organization's work. In the field, students will interview (or have informal discussions with) young people helped by the organization in order to construct a narrative about their lives, their perceptions of themselves, and their experiences.
FREN
FREN250
Introduction to Cultural and Textual Analysis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: FREN204; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Restriction: Must not be a native/fluent speaker of French.
Credit only granted for: FREN250 or FREN250H.
Introduction to cultural and textual analysis of selected readings from various genres in French literature. Taught in French.
Cross-listed with FREN250H. Credit granted for FREN250 or FREN250H.
FREN250H
Introduction to Cultural and Textual Analysis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: FREN204; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Restriction: Must not be a native/fluent speaker of French.
Credit only granted for: FREN250 or FREN250H.
Introduction to cultural and textual analysis of selected readings from various genres in French literature. Taught in French.
For general honors students only. Cross-listed with FREN250. Credit granted for FREN250 or FREN250H.
GEMS
Gemstone
GEMS104
Topics in Science, Technology and Society (STS)
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Prerequisite: GEMS100.
Restriction: Must be in the Gemstone program.
An examination of how cultural, economic, political and social forces shape scientific and technological systems and, conversely, how scientific and technological systems have affected the culture, economies, organization and politics of societies. Students in the course will form small teams to carry out semester-long research on socio/technical topics related to the course theme chosen for that specific semester.
GEMS104 discussions will be various times through the week beginning January 24 and running through spring break on March 18. Beginning with week 9, March 28 (the week after spring break), GEMS104 lectures will continue to be on Tuesdays from 5-6:15pm and discussions will move to Thursdays (March 31 is the first Thursday) from 5-6:15pm.
GERS
German Studies
GERS255
Once Upon a Time: Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
Credit only granted for: GERM255 or GERS255.
Formerly: GERM255.
A critical examination of how fairy tales and folklore pervade and influence diverse facets of Western culture, ranging from issues of politics and national identity, ethics and morality, violence and fear, education and pedagogy, to gender and sexuality in the establishment and regulation of social norms. Taking the German tales collected by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm as its focal point, the magical and often terrifying world of fairy tales within the German, European, and American cultural traditions from Romanticism to today will be explored. Taught in English.
HDCC
Design Cultures and Creativity
HDCC106
Seminar in Design Cultures & Creativity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Must be in the Design Cultures and Creativity Honors College Living/Learning program.
Introduction to the methods and theory of design production, with emphasis on creative and expressive platforms.
HEBR
HEBR314
Conversation and Composition II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: HEBR313; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
A practical language course recommended for all students continuing with Hebrew. Review of grammar and composition. Selected readings. Oral and written exercises.
HHUM
Honors Humanities Department Site
HHUM106
Honors Humanities: The Humanities in Practice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Recommended: HHUM105.
Restriction: Must be in the Honors Humanities Program.
Additional information: Priority enrollment will be given to students in Honors Humanities.
The application of the disciplines, methods and traditions of the Humanities to contemporary problems and issues such as social injustice, immigration, income inequality, and the role of social media. Students will apply to such issues the tools of the Humanities: research and historical analysis, critical reasoning, communication and persuasion, ethical debate, and imagination. The course will utilize the institutions of Washington, D.C. to explore contemporary problems and will guide students in the creation of their individual proposals for the capstone project that is the culmination of the curriculum in Honors Humanities.
HISP
Historic Preservation
HISP200
The Everyday and the American Environment
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Jointly offered with HISP615.
An introduction to the theories of the everyday within the context of the American built environment. Focuses primarily on the American experience of underrepresented, minority, and/or immigrant communities; both historical and contemporary. Attempts to challenge what is meant by American in describing the American everyday built environment.
HIST
History Department Site
HIST110
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Interpretation of select literature and art of the ancient Mediterranean world with a view to illuminating the antecedents of modern culture; religion and myth in the ancient Near East; Greek philosophical, scientific, and literary invention; and the Roman tradition in politics and administration.
HIST200
Interpreting American History: Beginnings to 1877
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU
Credit only granted for: HIST156 or HIST200.
Formerly: HIST156.
The United States from colonial times to the end of the Civil War. Establishment and development of American institutions.
HIST201
Interpreting American History: From 1865 to the Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: HIST157 or HIST201.
Formerly: HIST157.
The United States from the end of the Civil War to the present. Economic, social, intellectual, and political developments. Rise of industry and emergence of the United States as a world power.
HIST205
Environmental History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU
An exploration of the way different societies have used, imagined, and managed nature. Includes examination of questions of land use, pollution, conservation, and the ideology of nature, especially but not exclusively in Europe and North America.
HIST219I
Religions of the Ancient Near East
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: RELS225, JWST225.
Credit only granted for: JWST225, HIST219I, RELS225, or RELS219A.
Formerly: RELS219A.
Introduction to ancient Near Eastern religious systems and mythology, from the third millennium BCE through the fourth century BCE. Particular emphasis on Mesopotamia and ancient Israel.
Cross-listed with JWST225 and RELS219A. Credit only granted for JWST225, RELS219A and HIST219I.
HIST287
Why the Jews? Historical and Cultural Investigations
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have completed HIST282, HIST283, JWST234, or JWST235.
Cross-listed with JWST233.
Credit only granted for: HIST287 or JWST233.
Examines the history and culture of the Jews from the thirteenth century BCE/BC to the present through an examination of significant themes or problems (such as "religion" or "diaspora") that shape our understanding of the Jewish people. A primary focus in the course will be on texts, artifacts, and other cultural products by Jews and others that illustrate the history of the Jews help understand their cultural heritage.
HIST291
Jewish Texts and Cultures of the Second Temple Period
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: JWST231.
Credit only granted for: HIST291 or JWST231.
An introduction to the literature, history, and culture of Jews in the period between the sixth century BCE and the second century CE. Special topics may include the rise of the formation of the biblical canon, scriptural interpretation, sectarian and revolutionary movements, and growth of the diaspora.
HIST328W
Women in Classical Antiquity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: CLAS320, WGSS320.
Credit only granted for: CLAS320, WMST320, WGSS320 or HIST328W.
A study of women's image and reality in ancient Greek and Roman societies through an examination of literary, linguistic, historical, legal, and artistic evidence; special emphasis in women's role in the family, views of female sexuality, and the place of women in creative art. Readings in primary sources in translation and modern critical writings.
HIST339J
Ancient Slavery and its American Impacts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: CLAS340.
Credit only granted for: CLAS340 or HIST339J.
Interrogates how slavery permeated the ancient Mediterranean societies of Greece and Rome. We will pay particular attention to how hierarchical inequalities are institutionalized, experienced, and represented and to how different marginalized and dominant groups interacted. Enslaved persons performed necessary labor in Greece and Rome and their work was essential for the formation of ancient society in agriculture, mining, domestic spaces, literature, finance, and government. Studying ancient slavery offers a chance to examine Greece and Rome from the bottom up, parsing the scant literary and material evidence for the lives and struggles of enslaved persons. We will practice several different approaches in order to tease out the systematic, economic, political, and personal effects of slavery in the ancient world. The United States of America was also founded as a slave society, and discussions of slavery in the Americas often look back to the ancient Mediterranean. The course will therefore conclude with a unit on how enslavers and abolitionists in the United States utilized and responded to slavery in antiquity.
HNUH
University Honors
HNUH228U
A Life Worth Living: The Legacy of Eugenics in Genetics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
Should parents be able to choose their child's eye color? Or alter their child's genome to eliminate a hereditary disability? While these might seem like different concerns, both are eugenic questions. In this class students will learn about the legacy of eugenics and its role in the development of genetics by analyzing science fiction works through the lens of disability studies. We'll explore the past to identify who has historically been considered "fit" and look to the future to consider what kinds of embodiments, and life experiences, society seems willing to let disappear.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH228U is part of the Redesigning Life thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH228B to complete the cluster. Redesigning Life courses will be offered through Spring 2024.
HNUH238W
Monsters and Racism: Black Horror and Speculative Fiction
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: WGSS298W.
Credit only granted for: HONR299Y, HNUH238W, or WGSS298W.
Formerly: HONR299Y.
The previous decade has been considered a renaissance for Black Horror. From Get Out to Lovecraft Country, the genre has enjoyed unprecedented mainstream media buzz and accolades. This course looks at contemporary Black horror and speculative fiction as cultural texts which put into question our notions of human(e) and inhuman(e) through critiques of white supremacy and accompanying oppressions. Students will learn a host of critical skills through close reading and analysis of literature and film by Black creators such as Jordan Peele, Misha Green, Toni Morrison, Jewelle Gomez, and Octavia Butler. With the ability to interpret cultural texts using literary criticism, film analysis, history, cultural studies, ethnic studies, feminist theory, and the social sciences, students will connect these texts to continuing historical and contemporary issues of racial and cultural oppression such as medical discrimination, policing and criminalization, misogynoir, and racialized capitalism.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later. This course is part of the Systemic Racism Thematic Cluster and must be paired with HNUH 238B to complete the cluster. Systemic Racism courses will be offered through Spring 2024.
HNUH258W
Migration, Myth, and Memory: Humanity and Hope in the Immigrant Novel
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
Stories of immigrants to the United States reveal the metamorphosis of the nation itself: labor, culture, religion, and politics have all been transformed by diverse waves of new Americans. Simultaneously, the outlook and traditions of migrants have been profoundly affected by these processes. As a result, both migration and Americanism remain highly contested notions, particularly in light of forced migrations that mark the nation's early history. This course grapples with the complex ways that identity, memory, and culture are made and remade. Moreover, students engage these concepts at the granular level, considering how individual experiences interface with broad historical trends. Through discussions centered on novels about diverse immigrant experiences, students will learn to contextualize problems, re-humanize individuals associated with major social trends and political controversies, and transcend cliches about immigration and American culture through humane interrogation.
This course is part of the Metamorphosis thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH258B to complete the cluster. Metamorphosis courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH259T
Drawn to D.C.: Reading the City
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
A movement known as the Metropolitan Revolution has recognized cities as sites of concentrated economic growth and political power. What does that movement have to do with you? Not only does the city change who you are, but the ambitions and fears that you bring to it also alter what is already there. With Washington, D.C. as a case study, this course considers cities in the context of the ambitious plans that developed them and the unbuilt spaces that open us to imagining them anew. From the ideological tensions and competing policies that politicize urban space, to the construction challenges and social implications of choices made, why we build is as important as what we build. We will experience Washington through its history of spaces, stories, music, art; and learn to see ourselves as co-designers of its present. This course is self-contained but paired with HNUH259P in the Drawn to D.C. track, which explores the created spaces we inhabit, and how they inhabit us.
HUNH259T pairs with HUNH259P to complete the Drawn to D.C. Theory/Practice track. This pair of courses can be taken in any order.
HNUH268U
Power, Politics, and the Past: Local Communities and Cultural Heritage
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
The politics of the past surround us. An online memorial to the struggle against the Dakota Pipeline, the call to commemorate Indigeneity instead of Columbus, monuments to the Confederacy torn down... How do diverse communities claim--or reject--particular places, practices, and ideas as their shared heritage, and why? In this course, we will explore these questions with reference to Indigenous communities in global context, with a particular focus on Mexico. Students will engage with theoretical approaches and contemporary case studies to analyze the politics and ethics surrounding the use of the past in diverse Indigenous presents. Visits to DC's museums and archives will help students practice theorizing real-world materials. Students will leave the course with the analytical tools necessary to understand cultural heritage and advocate for Indigenous perspectives on the past. A typical day in this course will involve reading an article-length work and participating in student-led discussion.
This course is part of the Heritage thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH268B to complete the cluster. Heritage courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH268V
Art Museums and the Politics of Cultural Heritage
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
Despite the great variety of art museums in the world, these institutions share a common goal: to preserve and interpret cultural consciousness through objects or other material facets of human agency. While these collections often feature the cultural heritage(s) of their lands, in many cases, they also hold objects that have been taken away through illegal or morally questionable practices from their original context. Thus, they prompt discussions about who these holdings really belong to, how they should be displayed and interpreted, and whether they should return to their places of origin. This course explores a number of these issues by asking some fundamental questions: why do art museums matter? How have they evolved over time? What can they become in the future? Students will debate these questions to gain a finer understanding of the complex role of these institutions as custodians of cultural heritage.
This course is part of the Heritage thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH268B to complete the cluster. Heritage courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH278B
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
How do ordinary citizens power democracy? At the age of 18, every American citizen is endowed with the right to vote, but what if democracy demands more than voting? With democratic processes seemingly in peril all around us, what can and should ordinary citizens do to safeguard democracy? Looking beyond the basic right to vote, this class will instead explore the complex ecosystem of citizenship practices necessary for collective self-governance. Turning to both philosophy and history, the course material addresses the power and peril of such civic habits as mutual aid, economic participation, tolerance, attention, organizing, protest, and more. We consider what resources these habits require, what virtues they inspire, and what happens when they conflict with each other. Students in this course will acquire the tools to develop and act on their own answer to the pressing question of what it will take to save democracy.
IMDM
Immersive Media Design
IMDM150
Digital Media Theory and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Must be in the Immersive Media Design program; or permission of IMDM - Immersive Media Design program.
Credit only granted for: ARTT150 or IMDM150.
An introduction to the fundamental structures and themes of digital culture in contemporary society. This course will provide you with a theoretical grounding in which to understand the current landscape of digital media culture, design and art. As an introductory course for the Immersive Media Design major, the focus will be on contextualizing immersive digital media such as virtual reality, augmented reality, immersive projection, and electronic art installation through reading, writing and discussion. Students will have opportunities to experience a range of these technologies first hand.
INST
Information Studies
INST104
Design Across Campus
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
What is design, who does it, and how is it done? There is no one answer to this question--it depends on who you ask. The answers to these questions vary across disciplines and across the University campus. This course, designed with modules from contributors in UMD programs including Information Studies, Human-Computer Interaction, Graphic Design, Immersive Media Arts, Journalism, Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Engineering, and Policy, will introduce students to the goals and values, approaches, skills, and practices of diverse fields of design. It will enable students to identify grand challenges in design and serve as a sorting hat to help students find a design practice that matches their own values, approaches, skills and goals.
ITAL
Italian Department Site
ITAL411
Monsters and Demons: the Faces of Evil in Dante's Inferno
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
An interdisciplinary study of Dante's Inferno as represented in the Divine Comedy. Special emphasis on Dante's own portrayal of monsters and demons and their roles in the poet's eschatological vision of Hell.Taught in English
JAPN
Japanese Department Site
JAPN425
The Atomic Bomb in Literature and Memory
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
Study of declassified documents and commentary on the United States decision to use the bomb in 1945, the many ways Japanese writers have attempted to express their indescribable experiences in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the shaping of historical narratives and national identities in post-war Japan and the U.S. Taught in English.
JOUR
Journalism Department Site
JOUR282
Beyond Facebook: How Social Media are Transforming Society, Culture, Business and Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR289F or JOUR282.
Formerly: JOUR289F.
How has social media changed the world, and how has the world changed social media? This course explores how social media has influenced relationships, culture, industry, politics, and the information environment, as well as how significant global events and technological advancements have contributed to the evolution of social media. This course gives students a broad contextual understanding of social media that they may apply in their daily lives as well as future academic inquiry.
JOUR283
Probing War: Investigative Narratives and American Conflicts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR283 or JOUR289J.
Formerly: JOUR289J.
Students will explore the realities of war through the work of journalists who pushed beyond the daily headlines, some risking life and limb, to challenge official versions and document uncomfortable realities about American conflicts.
JOUR456
Literature in Journalism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Credit only granted for: JOUR456 or JOUR673.
From Truman Capote's In Cold Blood to Mark Bowden's Black Hawk Down, students will examine how literary works can help writers approach a subject in a different way than more traditional forms of journalism, including the advantages and limitations of the style.
JWST
Jewish Studies Department Site
JWST225
Religions of the Ancient Near East
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: RELS225, HIST219I.
Credit only granted for: JWST225, HIST219I, RELS225, or RELS219A.
Formerly: RELS219A.
Introduction to ancient Near Eastern religious systems and mythology, from the third millennium BCE through the fourth century BCE. Particular emphasis on Mesopotamia and ancient Israel.
JWST231
Jewish Texts and Cultures of the Second Temple Period
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: HIST291.
Credit only granted for: HIST291 or JWST231.
An introduction to the literature, history, and culture of Jews in the period between the sixth century BCE and the second century CE. Special topics may include the rise of the formation of the biblical canon, scriptural interpretation, sectarian and revolutionary movements, and growth of the diaspora.
JWST233
Why the Jews? Historical and Cultural Investigations
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have completed HIST282, HIST283, JWST234, or JWST235.
Cross-listed with HIST287.
Credit only granted for: JWST233 or HIST287.
Examines the history and culture of the Jews from the thirteenth century BCE/BC to the present through an examination of significant themes or problems (such as "religion" or "diaspora") that shape our understanding of the Jewish people. A primary focus in the course will be on texts, artifacts, and other cultural products by Jews and others that illustrate the history of the Jews help understand their cultural heritage.
JWST319P
Arts & Humanities in Social Innovation, Change, and Justice: Do Good Now
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: ARHU380.
Credit only granted for: ARHU380, BSOS388B, JWST319P, or PLCY388D.
The course serves as the core course for the Arts-and-Humanities track in PLCY's minor in "Nonprofit Leadership and Social Innovation." Students will be introduced to the role that the Arts and Humanities can play in social innovation and social change, while exploring various mechanisms for achieving impact with a focus on advancing social justice, equity and systems change. This course deepens understandings of nonprofit leadership, entrepreneurship and social innovation by guiding students through the creation and implementation of social change projects and ventures of their choice.
Cross-listed with ARHU380. For Spring 2022: Credit granted only for JWST319P, ARHU380, BSOS388B, or PLCY388D.

The course serves as the core course for the Arts-and-Humanities track in PLCY's minor in "Nonprofit Leadership and Social Innovation." Students will be introduced to the role that the Arts and Humanities can play in social innovation and social change, while exploring various mechanisms for achieving impact with a focus on advancing social justice, equity and systems change. This course deepens understandings of nonprofit leadership, entrepreneurship and social innovation by guiding students through the creation and implementation of social change projects and ventures of their choice.
KNES
Kinesiology Department Site
KNES285
History of Physical Culture, Sport, & Science in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Restricted to majors or non-majors with less than or equal to 60 credits.
Credit only granted for: KNES285 or KNES293.
Examines the history of physical culture in America, focusing on the period from the end of the Civil War to the Cold War. Physical culture refers to a broad range of movement practices including sport, play, rehabilitative exercise, health and fitness training, and recreation and leisure. More specifically, we challenge the idea that historical physical culture practices--and the scientific processes from which they were derived--were 'neutral' or 'objective'; rather, we explore the cultural, social, political, and economic contexts shaping physical culture knowledge, study, structures, and policies across American history. The goal is for you to learn and apply techniques of historical analysis to develop a critical understanding of how knowledge about, and practices of, physical culture supported a particular social order via the construction of difference, norms, and/or hierarchies, and ultimately contributed to some of the inequalities that endure today.
LACS
Latin American and Caribbean Studies
LACS235
Issues in Latin American and Caribbean Studies II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: PORT235, SPAN235.
Credit only granted for: LASC235, PORT235, SPAN235, or LACS235.
Formerly: LASC235.
Major issues shaping Latin American and Caribbean societies including the changing constructions of race, ethnicity, gender and class as well as expressions of popular cultures and revolutionary practices. Taught in English.
LARC
Landscape Architecture Department Site
LARC160
Introduction to Landscape Architecture and Environmental Design
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
History, theory, philosophy and current practice of the profession of landscape architecture. Explores the interactive relationship between humans and their environment by examining people's perceptions of and changing attitude towards the landscape, as well as, an examination of how these are related to ecological and cultural influences. Topics include urban, ecological, community and creative design.
LARC263
History of Landscape Architecture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
A survey of landscape architecture history from the ancient Western civilizations to the twentieth century with consideration of parallel developments in the Eastern World, European Africa and the Americas.
LGBT
Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Studies
LGBT265
LGBTQ+ Literatures and Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have completed LGBT265.
Cross-listed with: ENGL265.
Credit only granted for: ENGL265 or LGBT265.
A study of literary and cultural expressions of queer and trans identities, positionalities, and analytics through an exploration of literature, art, and media. We will examine historical and political power relations by considering the intersections of sexuality and gender with race, class, nation, and disability. Topics include the social construction and regulation of sexuality and gender, performance and performativity, intersectionality, and the relationship between aesthetic forms and queer/ trans subjectivity. Our interpretations will be informed by queer and trans theories.
LING
Linguistics Department Site
LING240
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in LING200.
Additional information: Required for Linguistics majors and recommended for students in related fields.
The study of language as a cognitive phenomenon. Ways of representing people's knowledge of their native language, ways in which that knowledge is attained naturally by children, and how it is used in speaking and listening. Additional topics may include: animal communication, language and the brain, language and thought.
MLSC
MD Language Science Ctr
MLSC250
Lol that's not funny: Language change and linguistic creativity in online communication
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Recent developments in technology, from texting to Zoom, have created new environments for human language use. Examining how communication is changing in these environments highlights humans' endless linguistic ingenuity -- ranging from new vocabulary and punctuation conventions to the use of hashtags, emoji and memes. At the same time, these linguistic innovations exemplify broader patterns of language change and diversity that have been documented and studied by language scientists. In this course, we will engage with the study of language variation and change through a survey of language use in different online environments, and will apply insights from linguistic research to analyze our own and others' language use in more nuanced ways.
MUSC
School of Music Department Site
MUSC130
What Does Music Mean?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Must not be in any of the following programs (Music (Professional Program); Music Education).
An examination of how music creates meaning in different eras, through studying musical sound, biography, and social history.
MUSC204
Popular Music in Black America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Traces black popular music in the U.S. with a special focus on spirituals, ragtime, the blues, early jazz, R&B, Motown, funk, soul, and rap. Examines how these styles have been borrowed by the American music industry.
MUSC205
History of Popular Music, 1950-Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
A historical survey of rock music (blues, rock, soul, metal, rap, etc.) from circa 1950 to the present, with emphasis on popular music as music and popular music as social history.
MUSC210
The Impact of Music on Life
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: MUET210 or MUSC210.
Formerly: MUET210.
Music as a part of culture. Materials drawn from traditions throughout the globe to illustrate issues of historical and contemporary significance, including the impact of race, class and gender on the study of music.
MUSC215
World Popular Musics and Identity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: MUET200 or MUSC215.
Formerly: MUET200.
Focus on popular musics in different cultures with an emphasis on cross-cultural comparisons and analysis of how musics and identity intersect.
MUSC220
Selected Musical Cultures of the World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Must not be in any of the following programs: (Music (Professional Program); Music Education).
A critical and comparative exploration of musical practices from around the world in their social, political and economic contexts.
Also offered as ANTH298B. For Spring 2020; credit only granted for MUET220, MUSC220, or ANTH298B.
PERS
Persian Department Site
PERS385
Theatre and Dance in Iran and Afghanistan
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Repeatable to 3 credits if content differs.
Cross-listed with: TDPS358A, THET328W.
Credit only granted for: TDPS358A, THET328W, PERS398A, or PERS385.
Formerly: PERS398A.
Students will learn about stories, plays, and movements in Iran and Afghanistan from past to present. Through watching performances, readings, and discussions, we explore the relationship between storytelling, body, space, and power in forming and performing identity and life experiences. Looking at case studies from traditional, popular, and western style dance and theater are an exciting part of the course. Note: This course requires no prior knowledge of Persian culture or dance and theatre studies on the part of the students.
PHIL
Philosophy Department Site
PHIL100
Introduction to Philosophy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
An introduction to the literature, problems, and methods of philosophy either through a study of some of the main figures in philosophic thought or through an examination of some of the central and recurring problems of philosophy.
PHIL140
Contemporary Moral Issues
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
The uses of philosophical analysis in thinking clearly about such widely debated moral issues as abortion, euthanasia, homosexuality, pornography, reverse discrimination, the death penalty, business ethics, sexual equality, and economic justice.
PHIL202
Know Thyself: Wisdom Through Cognitive Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PHIL209N or PHIL202.
Formerly: PHIL209N.
How do we improve our decision making? Cognitive science demonstrates that self-knowledge isn't as easy as we think, and that there are numerous biases and fallacies that impact our decision-making in ways that are hard for us to be aware of. In this course you will learn what some of these are and how they have been discovered, and you will explore potential strategies for avoiding these fallacies and for making wiser choices.
PHIL203
The Rights and Wrongs of Killing People
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PHIL209J or PHIL203.
Formerly: PHIL209J.
Virtually everyone thinks it's permissible to kill people only in special circumstances. But why is killing usually wrong? Is it ever acceptable to kill an innocent human being intentionally? This course raises these and related questions and examines cases such as terrorism, suicide, abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, war. Except for a brief discussion of animals, all the controversies considered deal with killing and causing death to human beings.
PHIL205
Are Sports Ethical?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PHIL205, PHIL209G, or HONR229E.
Formerly: HONR229E.
Things happen routinely in sports that would seem morally unacceptable in other context: violence between the participants, attempts to trick the referee, fans hoping that some players would do embarrassingly badly, spectators feeling anger towards whole nations. Nonetheless, all of this may seem reasonable and even justifiable within a sporting context. This course will investigate the ethical structure of sports, and what it tells us about the ethics of everyday life. Philosophy will provide the primary disciplinary context, but we will also think about sociological, legal and anthropological perspectives on sports. Issues will include the nature of sportsmanship, what types of violence in sports are acceptable, drug use in sports, what it means to be a fan (for example, asking why loyalty to your team is valuable) and how our view of sports interacts with our view of nations. By the end of the course you should have gained familiarity with a variety of ethical concepts and a sensitivity to the ethical issues in sports. You should also find that by thinking about morality in the context of sports, you will look at larger ethical issues in new ways.
PHIL220
Bioethics: Regulating Right and Wrong
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Credit only granted for: PHIL209A or PHIL220.
Formerly: PHIL209A.
Bioethicists formulate ethical guidelines. They answer questions such as: When life-saving health resources are scarce, who should get them? Should we increase supply of one such resource, kidneys, by buying them from living "donors"? If drug trials in developing countries benefit patients who consent to participate, are the trials ethical, even if the same research would be forbidden in the US? If a sick person aims to hasten her death, how, if at all, might her doctor permissibly help her? In this course, students construct and defend ethical rules in four domains: research ethics, allocation of scarce resources, markets in organs, and physician-assisted dying.
PHIL236
Philosophy of Religion
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: RELS236.
Credit only granted for: PHIL236 or RELS236.
A philosophical study of some of the main problems of religious thought: the nature of religious experience, the justification of religious belief, the conflicting claims of religion and science, and the relation between religion and morality.
PHIL245
Political and Social Philosophy I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
A critical examination of such classical political theories as those of Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, Marx, and such contemporary theories as those of Hayek, Rawls, and recent Marxist thinkers.
PHIL320
Knowing Oneself and Knowing the World: Early Modern Philosophy from Descartes to Kant
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: 6 credits in PHIL courses; or permission of instructor.
A study of major philosophical issues of the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries through an examination of such philosophers as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Cavendish, Locke, Berkeley, Hume and Kant
RELS
Religious Studies
RELS170
Ancient Myths and Modern Lives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Cross-listed with: CLAS170.
Credit only granted for: CLAS170 or RELS170.
Additional information: This course cannot be taken for language credit.
What are myths and why do we tell them? What powers do myths have? We will tackle these questions by looking at the enduring and fascinating myths from ancient Greece and Rome. In addition to studying how they shaped ancient societies, we will also look at their modern influence and reflect upon the power that myths still hold in our contemporary world. Taught in English.
RELS225
Religions of the Ancient Near East
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: HIST219I, JWST225.
Credit only granted for: JWST225, HIST219I, RELS225, or RELS219A.
Formerly: RELS219A.
Introduction to ancient Near Eastern religious systems and mythology, from the third millennium BCE through the fourth century BCE. Particular emphasis on Mesopotamia and ancient Israel.
RELS271
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVCC, SCIS
Credit only granted for: RELS289I or RELS271.
Formerly: RELS289I.
Draws upon examples from a wide variety of religious traditions to explore the question of what religion is and how to best understand it. Engagement with diverse approaches to religion including phenomenology and the study of "the sacred"; sociology and the study of religious communities; and questions of religious experience, ritual, and identity formation.
RUSS
Russian Department Site
RUSS287
The Power of the Word: Freedom of Speech in the U.S. and Russia
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: RUSS287 or RUSS289I.
Formerly: RUSS289I.
Additional information: Taught in English.
The central theme is the abiding human propensity to ask questions, to use language to pursue inquiry. To be a "critical thinker," one must develop the habit and discipline of asking questions and challenging assumptions. Through a comparative approach to the US and Russian experiences, we will explore the role of language and its power in different political and social systems. We will explore such questions as: Why is free speech so fiercely defended in a democracy and such a threat to totalitarianism? What is the relationship between free speech, political power and dissent? Is the pen still mightier than the sword, even in the nuclear age? What has shaped our current attitudes toward freedom of expression? How has the concept of political free speech been extended to include freedom of expression in general, such as in the creative arts? What role do new technologies play in the arena of free speech debates? We will explore how freedom of speech and expression has been defended or its suppression justified in the US and Russia. We will practice the art of questioning and constructing counter-arguments throughout the course.
SLLC
School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures Department Site
SLLC286
Living the Good Life: Chinese Philosophy in the Modern World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Additional information: Taught in English.
Confucius, Mencius, Zhuangzi and other Chinese thinkers who lived more than 2,000 years ago would argue that the contemporary Western emphasis on self-discovery (Find yourself) and self-acceptance has led you astray. See what they have to say and discuss what relevance it has for the modern world as we study how early Chinese thinkers wrestled with questions of existence, morality, and governance. No previous knowledge of Chinese philosophy and history will be assumed and no prerequisites are required. We will discuss ideas that are both historical and relevant to students' lives. What is "the Way"? How do we cultivate spontaneity? Is there a stable self? How can we be more alive? These are questions important for ancient kings but also for UMD students choosing a major, or wondering how ARHU can benefit them.
SPAN
Spanish Department Site
SPAN207
Reading and Writing in Spanish
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: Must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in SPAN204; or must have appropriate Foreign Language Placement Test (FLPT) score.
Selected readings with emphasis on reading comprehension and the development of reading strategies. Work in composition writing and a review of selected grammatical topics. Complements material of SPAN204.
SPAN235
Issues in Latin American and Caribbean Studies II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: LACS235, PORT235.
Credit only granted for: LASC235, PORT235, SPAN235, or LACS235.
Formerly: LASC235.
Major issues shaping Latin American and Caribbean societies including the changing constructions of race, ethnicity, gender and class as well as expressions of popular cultures and revolutionary practices. Taught in English.
SPAN303
Approaches to Cultural Materials in the Hispanic World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: SPAN301.
Recommended: May elect to take SPAN311 and/or SPAN316 in same semester as SPAN303.
Development of proficiency in critical thought through the reading, viewing, and analytical discussion of major genres and styles of cultural materials selected from Spanish-speaking world. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN332
Spanish Culture, Civilization and Literature II: Renaissance and Baroque
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: SPAN303; and (SPAN311 or SPAN316).
An overview of cultural and literary production of Spain from the late 15th through late 17th centuries, exploring the production of literary texts in their socio-historical, political, religious and cultural contexts and development. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN333
Spanish Culture, Civilization and Literature III: Modern Times
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: SPAN303; and (SPAN311 or SPAN316).
An overview of cultural and literary production of Spain from the late 17th century through the present day, exploring the production of literary texts in their socio-historical, political, religious and cultural contexts and development. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN362
Latin American Literatures and Cultures II: From Independence to Nation Formation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Prerequisite: SPAN303; and (SPAN311 or SPAN316).
An overview of cultural and literary production of Latin America from the 18th Century to approximately 1900, exploring the production of literary texts in their socio-historical, political, and cultural contexts and development. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN363
Latin American Literatures and Cultures III: From Modernism to Neo-Liberalism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Prerequisite: SPAN303; and (SPAN311 or SPAN316).
An overview of cultural and literary production of Latin America from the late 19th through the early 21st centuries, exploring the production of literary texts in their socio-historical, political, and cultural contexts and development. Taught in Spanish.
THET
Theatre Department Site
THET110
Introduction to the Theatre
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
In the age of pop music and blockbuster films, of memes and viral videos, we often forget that theatre was one of the original forms of popular entertainment. We will focus on theatre practitioners including actors, directors, designers and backstage personnel to understand how theatre is produced. We will also consider popular entertainment in Europe and America, with a particular focus on musical theatre and Broadway to explore how theatre communicates, resonates, and remains relevant to all audiences.
THET251
Broadway Mashup: Remixing America Through Musical Theater
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Interrogate musical theater's political history, investigating how this uniquely American genre uses narrative, song, and dance to weave critical differences across race, ethnicity, immigration status, religion, gender, sexuality, and ability into our national fabric.
THET294
Black Theatre and Performance II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Sophomore standing or higher.
Thematic and historical survey of African-American drama from the 1960s to the present. Emphasis on sociopolitical context, thematic thrust, issues, styles, the aesthetic reflected in the work, impact on African-American and general theatre audiences.
TLPL
Teaching and Learning, Policy and Leadership Department Site
TLPL250
Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
Credit only granted for: EDPS210 or TLPL250.
Formerly: EDPS210.
An examination of illustrative historical and philosophical examples of the interplay of ideas and events in the shaping of educational aims and practices from ancient cultures to modern technological societies.
WGSS
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
WGSS250
Introduction to WGSS: Art and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: WMST250 or WGSS250.
Formerly: WMST250.
Provides students with a critical introduction to the ways that art and art activism have served as a conduit to understanding and challenging systems of inequity and practices of normativity. Interrogating the categories of gender, sexuality, race, class, ability, the course will provide students with an examination of how artists have responded to pressing social justice issues of their eras. While the course centers visual art, students will also engage genres such as music, plays, literature, digital and performance art as arenas of social change.
WGSS255
Reading Women Writing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: ENGL250.
Credit only granted for: ENGL250, WMST255 or WGSS255.
Formerly: WMST255.
Explores literary and cultural expressions by women and their receptions within a range of historical periods and genres. Topics such as what does a woman need in order to write, what role does gender play in the production, consumption, and interpretation of texts, and to what extent do women comprise a distinct literary subculture. Interpretation of texts will be guided by feminist and gender theory, ways of reading that have emerged as important to literary studies over the last four decades.
WGSS275
World Literature by Women
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU,