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Courses - Spring 2024
AAST
Asian American Studies Department Site
Open Seats as of
02/28/2024 at 10:30 PM
AAST351
Asian Americans and Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Credit only granted for: AAST351, AAST398M or AAST398N.
Formerly: AAST398M, AAST398N.
From yellow peril invaders to model minority allies, Asian Americans have crafted their own dynamic cultural expressions in a number of media from film, television, and music to fashion, sports, and food that reveal and contest the contradictions of the U.S. nation-state. Asian American culture also uniquely sits at the nexus of immigration flows and digital technologies, providing a transnational lens to view the US place in the world. This advanced course, then, will introduce students to the study and practice of Asian American cyktyre as multiple , hybrid, and heterogeneous. It will do so through three sections: section one will introduce students to classical, cultural, and media concepts as well as relevant keywords outlined by Asian American Studies scholars; section two will review the work of Asian American cultural theorists; section three will focus on analyses of particular Asian American cultural productions. In doing so, students will gain an understanding of the shifting and interlocking tensions among the local, the national, and the global that form the cultural geographies of Asian America.
AMST
American Studies Department Site
AMST210
Introduction to Ethnography
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
A qualitative research method course used to study social worlds communities, cultures, institutions, and other social groups from the perspectives of the people who inhabit those social worlds. Ethnographic research involves understanding cultural traditions from an insider's perspective by studying the everyday lives of people steeped in those traditions.
AMST450
(Perm Req)
Seminar in American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: AMST201 and AMST340; and 1 course in AMST.
Restriction: Senior standing; and must be in American Studies program.
Developments in theories and methods of American Studies scholarship, with emphasis upon interaction between the humanities and the social sciences in the process of cultural analysis and evaluation.
ANSC
Animal Science
ANSC250
Companion Animal Care and Management
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Credit only granted for: ANSC250 and ANSC305.
Formerly: ANSC305.
Care and management of the companion small animals. Species covered include the cat, dog, rodents, lagomorphs, reptiles, amphibians, birds and others as class interest and schedule dictate. Basic description, evolutionary development, breeding, nutritional and environmental requirements, and public health aspects will be presented for each species.
ANSC340
Health Management of Animal Populations
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: BSCI223; and (ANSC220, ANSC232, ANSC242, ANSC250, ANSC255, ANSC260, or ANSC262).
Recommended: ANSC212.
Credit only granted for: ANSC340 or ANSC412.
Formerly: ANSC412.
A study of common and emerging animal diseases and their prevention and control. The main focus will be on livestock and poultry diseases. However, zoonotic, wildlife, and laboratory animal diseases will also be discussed along with risk assessment, bioterrorism counter-measures, and animal welfare, especially as these topics interface or impact animals used in food production.
ANSC359
(Perm Req)
Internship Experience in Animal and Avian Sciences
Credits: 3 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ANSC220, ANSC232, ANSC242, ANSC250, ANSC255, ANSC260, or ANSC262. Restriction: Must be in a major within the AGNR-Animal & Avian Sciences department; and permission of instructor.
ANSC435
Experimental Embryology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ANSC212.
Recommended: Completion of one course in reproductive physiology is recommended.
Credit only granted for: ANSC435 or ANSC489M.
Formerly: ANSC489M.
Experimental approaches to mammalian embryology with emphasis on domestic livestock systems as applied to research and production systems. Lab will include hands-on experiments and demos of in vitro embryo production, embryo splitting, cell injection and nuclear transfer.
Students must pay a $50.00 lab materials fee.
ANTH
Anthropology Department Site
ANTH310
Method & Theory in Medical Anthropology and Global Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Prerequisite: ANTH210.
Jointly offered with ANTH665.
Credit only granted for: ANTH310, ANTH465, or ANTH665.
Formerly: ANTH465.
Provides a critical perspective to global health that encompasses key political, economic, and cultural factors associated with the nature and magnitude of global health issues such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, paying particular attention to how poverty and inequalities within and between societies has accelerated current global health challenges. Introduces students to how medical anthropologists have contributed to the debates surrounding the globalization of health.
Restriction: Must be in Anthropology program; or permission of BSOS Anthropology department.
ANTH341
Introduction to Zooarchaeology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Credit only granted for: ANTH298D, ANTH641 or ANTH341.
Formerly: ANTH298D.
Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains, especially bones, from archaeological contexts. This course will address both methodology as well as many of the main issues in contemporary zooarchaeology. Zooarchaeology stands at the intersection of a number of social and biological sciences, such as Biology, Osteology, Ecology, History, Anthropology and Economics. We will discuss basic animal osteology and the concepts and practices behind the identification of animal remains from archaeological contexts. We will cover the nature of the data in zooarchaeology, especially issues around using proxy data.
ANTH447
Material Culture Studies in Archaeology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ANTH240.
Credit only granted for: ANTH447, ANTH448C, ANTH647, or ANTH689C.
Formerly: ANTH448C.
An in-depth introduction to the world of material culture studies with a focus on the methods and theories in historical archaeology. Students will look at archaeological data as historical documents, commodities and as symbols expressing ideas.
ANTH467
Researching Environment and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Recommended: ANTH322, ANTH360, ENSP101, or ENSP102.
In this applied course, students use mixed methods to research a locally-based, environmental sustainability issue. Classroom time will be split between seminar discussions of theory, methods, and relevant case studies, and lab work focused on project development, data analysis, and report write up. Students are expected to spend additional time outside class on data collection, analysis, and writing
ANTH481
Environmental Ethnographies of Asia
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Credit only granted for: ANTH481 or ANTH681.
Examines social and ecological environments in Asia through the lens of classic and contemporary ethnographies from across the continent. Considers how cultural, political and economic dynamics interact with ecological systems in both recurring and unexpected ways. Ethnographies include case studies of global commodity chains, technoscientific management, borders and migration, conservation, and local knowledge as they intersect with changing environments.
ARCH
Architecture Department Site
ARCH271
People, Planet, and Profit: Building Sustainable Places
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Cross-listed with: RDEV250.
Credit only granted for: ARCH271 or RDEV250.
An introduction to the four disciplines represented in the School: architecture and urban design, community planning, historic preservation, and real estate development, that work to create a more sustainable environment for the future to create a more sustainable environment for the future using our interpretation of the quadruple bottom line: socio-cultural, economic, environmental, and design sustainability. Students will be provided with an understanding of the fundamental scholarship and processes of each of these disciplines and examine the intersections between them. Additionally, they will learn by applying the approaches of the four disciplines through a series of field studies.
Cross-listed with RDEV250. Credit granted for ARCH271 or RDEV250.
ARCH272
Sustainability at College Park
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS or DSSP, SCIS
Explore the ways and the degrees to which University of Maryland, College Park campus master planning and operations incorporate principles of sustainability including smart growth, LEED and other building rating systems, higher education rating systems, sustainable agriculture and transportation planning. Among other subjects, students will learn about the Campus and the City of College Park and survey the relationship between local, national and global sustainability concerns. Students will learn about the University's Climate Action Plan and the roles, and extent to which, the UMD Office of Sustainability and other campus units are helping develop a carbon-neutral and resource-efficient campus infrastructure.
ARCH386
(Perm Req)
Experiential Learning
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must have learning proposal approved by faculty sponsor and student's internship sponsor; and sophomore standing or higher; and permission of ARCH-Architecture Program.
Learning experience tied to internship of specified duration with targeted learning outcomes.
ARCH402
(Perm Req)
Architecture Design Studio III
Credits: 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ARCH401.
Restriction: Must be in Architecture (B.S.) program.
Architectural design studio with emphasis on building and facade typologies, the development of architectural promenade and sequence, public and/or civic infill buildings dependent upon the architectural promenade, and urban housing types of varying densities. The architect's obligations to urban context are explored in many dimensions including historical, typological, and physical.
ARHU
Arts and Humanities Department Site
ARHU158Q
Explorations in Arts and Humanities; The Power of Youth
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Restricted to first semester first year students in the College of Arts and Humanities.

Twenty-something influencers such as Kylie Jenner and Shawn Mendes use social media to reach their millions of followers and to help shape what they think about, talk about, and purchase. Former Parkland, Florida student David Hogg shows how young people can affect social change by advocating for stricter gun control laws on national media outlets. Starting with these examples and drawing from literature, politics, and gender and sexuality studies, we will analyze youth and its power in our culture.
ARHU275
Scriptwriting for Theater, Film, and Television
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Cross-listed with: ENGL275.
Credit only granted for: ENGL275 or ARHU275.
Introduction to the theory and practice of scriptwriting with an opportunity to read, view, evaluate, write, and revise texts meant to be performed. Students will practice writing for the stage, film, and television and also examine selected scripts, performances, and film and television clips as models for their own creative work. Students will complete frequent writing exercises, participate in workshops, and learn to apply scholarship to the analysis and critique of scripts.
ARHU320
(Perm Req)
Writers' House Second Year Colloquium: Writing for Publication
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Recommended: Completion of ARHU318 and ARHU319 recommended.
Restriction: Currently enrolled in Writers' House or permission of program.
Credit only granted for: ARHU319A or ARHU320.
Formerly: ARHU319A.
Students write, discuss and revise for multiple forms of publication: reading their own work at least once in public, sending work out for publication to literary journals, and producing a chapbook of high quality by end of semester.
Restricted to Jimenez-Porter Writers' House students.
ARHU380
Arts & Humanities in Social Innovation, Change, and Justice: Do Good Now
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: JWST319P.
Credit only granted for: ARHU380, BSOS388B, JWST319P, or PLCY388D.
The course serves as the core course for the Arts-and-Humanities track in PLCY's minor in "Nonprofit Leadership and Social Innovation." Students will be introduced to the role that the Arts and Humanities can play in social innovation and social change, while exploring various mechanisms for achieving impact with a focus on advancing social justice, equity and systems change. This course deepens understandings of nonprofit leadership, entrepreneurship and social innovation by guiding students through the creation and implementation of social change projects and ventures of their choice.
Cross-listed with JWST319P. For Spring 2023: Credit granted only for JWST319P, ARHU380, BSOS388B, or PLCY388D.
ARHU386
(Perm Req)
Experiential Learning
Credits: 3 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Permission of ARHU-College of Arts & Humanities.
Restriction: Junior standing or higher.
ARTH
Art History & Archaeology Department Site
ARTH260
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Can art effect social change? How may we use the history of radical and avant-garde art to inform present-day movements and models of artistic and creative activism? This course explores the modern and contemporary history of political art and arts activism on local, national, and global scales.
ARTH386
Experiential Learning
Credits: 3 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Permission of ARHU-Art History & Archaeology department.
Restriction: Junior standing or higher.
Supervised internship experience in diverse areas of art historical, archaeological, and museological work.
Contact department for information to register for this course.
ARTT
Art Studio Department Site
ARTT100
Two-Dimensional Design Fundamentals
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Principles and elements of two-dimensional design. Introduction to visual communication.
Students must pay a $40.00 studio lab fee.
ARTT110
Elements of Drawing I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Fundamental concepts, media, and processes of drawing. Emphasis on observation and representation in combination with individual expression. Subject matter includes still life, human figure, nature, the built environment, and conceptual projects.
Students must pay a $40.00 studio lab fee.
ASTR
Astronomy Department Site
ASTR315
Astronomy in Practice
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL or DSSP
Restriction: Must not be in Astronomy program.
Additional information: Appropriate for non-science majors.
Students learn astronomy research techniques and contribute significantly to the existing body of astronomical knowledge. Students apply methods and tools such as celestial coordinates, telescopes and CCD cameras, and appropriate analysis software to a specific observational goal. Students produce a work detailing their scientific result which will be submitted for publication in a professional venue. Each semester, the course focuses on a specific astronomical topic or type of object, such as asteroids, extrasolar planets, supernovae in other galaxies, quasars, etc.
BMGT
Business and Management Department Site
BMGT190H
Introduction to Design and Quality
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must be in the Quest program.
Cross-listed with: ENES190.
Credit only granted for: BMGT190 or ENES190.
QUEST students learn and apply design practices to design new products and services. Working in multidisciplinary teams, students use quality and process improvement methods to identify, analyze, and recommend solutions to real-world problems.
Cross-listed with ENES190H. Credit granted for ENES190H or BMGT190H.
BMGT289A
Social Enterprise: Changing the World through Innovation and Transformative Action
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
In this course, students will hear from real-life social entrepreneurs, explore current day social issues of sustainability, climate change, leadership, disruptive innovations, and create or blueprint business plans to generate positive social change. This class will focus on innovative thinking skills, personal narratives, and social interaction strategies and plans.
BMGT289B
How Do Innovators Think?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
In this course, students will learn about: a) the innovation process and the role of the individual in generating innovations and b) the attributes, habits, and skills of individuals who have successfully started innovative new businesses or significantly added value to an existing company.
This class will have an additional 5 meetings on Monday evenings from 5-7pm.
BMGT289D
Frauds, Scams, and Thefts: What, How and Why?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
The primary objective of this course is for students to gain a conceptual understanding of how fraud occurs, how it can be prevented, and how fraud can be detected through practical application of skills and tools. This course provides general background relating to fraud (e.g. history, prevalence, psychology), and it delves into the myriad types of fraud, scams and theft. This course also examines the trends in fraud detection and investigation; and introduces and explores with students the constant tension between public order and civil liberties in white collar crime, forensics, and hacking.
BMGT289E
Entrepreneurial Thinking for Non-Business Majors: How Not to Miss Great Opportunities Your Life Throws at You
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
In this course, students learn how to analyze the world around them and then notice and define new trends, emerging problems, impending gaps, and how to turn these into exciting opportunities by providing creative solutions. Students will have a chance to not only sharpen their critical thinking skills, but also learn how to take initiative, develop a working solution, identify and resolve conflicts, and be confident and persistent, yet flexible enough to respond to changes. Student teams identify a compelling problem in present day life and then propose a creative solution taking into account possible difficulties in implementation. In addition, students will also be given problems on a much smaller scale and asked to create and present a workable solution. Students will be exposed to how a visionary's mind works and the creative solution process. In addition, students will also learn how entrepreneurial thinking can improve their day-to-day life.
BMGT289I
Why Good Managers Make Bad Decisions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
This course provides an overview of the concepts, approaches, and vocabulary of evidence-based management (EBM) and provides an understanding of how experts in many disciplines can employ evidenced based decision making. EBM is an emerging movement in business to explicitly use the current best information in management decision making with special emphasis on relevant scientific findings and unbiased organizational facts. The course stresses how individuals practicing EBM learn how to rethink their approaches to data and knowledge in order to make more effective decisions.
BMGT461
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must not have completed BMGT361.
Credit only granted for: BMGT261, BMGT361, BMGT461, ENES460, SMLP470 or HLMN470.
Process of creating new ventures, including evaluating the entrepreneurial team, the opportunity and the financing requirements. Skills, concepts, mental attitudes and knowledge relevant for starting a new business.
Restricted to BMGT majors with 72 credit hours completed. Non-majors should register for BMGT461N. BMGT minors should register for BMGT461M.
BMGT461M
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must not have completed BMGT361.
Credit only granted for: BMGT261, BMGT361, BMGT461, ENES460, SMLP470 or HLMN470.
Process of creating new ventures, including evaluating the entrepreneurial team, the opportunity and the financing requirements. Skills, concepts, mental attitudes and knowledge relevant for starting a new business.
Restricted to Innovation & Entrepreneurship Minors (#BU03) and also BMGT majors with 72 credit hours completed.
BMGT461N
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must not have completed BMGT361.
Credit only granted for: BMGT261, BMGT361, BMGT461, ENES460, SMLP470 or HLMN470.
Process of creating new ventures, including evaluating the entrepreneurial team, the opportunity and the financing requirements. Skills, concepts, mental attitudes and knowledge relevant for starting a new business.
Open to all non-BMGT majors with 72 credit hours completed. BMGT majors should register for BMGT 461. Not open to Innovation and Entrepreneurship minors.
BMGT490H
QUEST Capstone Professional Practicum
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ENES390 or BMGT390.
Cross-listed with: ENES490.
Credit only granted for: BMGT490 or ENES490.
The capstone course for the QUEST Honors Program provides students with an opportunity to learn in multidisciplinary teams of business, engineering, and science students in a real-world setting. Companies engage teams of QUEST students with real organizational challenges and dedicate resources to help students address these problems. Student teams must enhance their skills in quality management, process improvement, and systems design and will apply these to add value to a client. In the process, students will improve their teamwork skills.
Restricted to QUEST program students. Cross-listed with ENES490H. Credit granted for ENES490H or BMGT490H.
BMGT495
Strategic Management
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
A case-based course where students learn to play the role of the "strategic manager" who defines the scope of its business operations and, within the chosen scope, how the firm will compete against rivals. This course focuses on how a firm can both formulate effective business-level and corporate-level strategies to achieve competitive advantage and earn above average profits.
BSCI
Biological Sciences Program Department Site
BSCI416
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in BSCI410.
Recommended: BSCI330.
Approaches to human genetics and applications to biology and medicine focusing on specific human genetic topics using primary research papers as the main resource.
(Sponsoring Dept.: CBMG).
BSCI417
Microbial Pathogenesis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: BSCI222; and (BSCI223 or BSCI283).
Restriction: Junior standing or higher.
Current research in microbial pathogenesis and the molecular and cellular basis of bacterial disease. Comprehensive overview of the molecular basis of pathogenesis with a focus on model microbial systems to illustrate mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. Topics covered: how microorganisms attach to and enter cells; how host cells are damaged by microbial products; how the host responds to invasion; and host-pathogen evolution.
BSCI455
Neuroscience Laboratory
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: NEUR306 or BSCI353; and PHYS132.
Recommended: NEUR305.
Cross-listed with: NEUR405.
Credit only granted for: PSYC401, NEUR405, BSCI455 or BSCI454.
Students will utilize neurophysiological techniques to examine fundamental principles of neurons and neural circuits. This course will reinforce content from prerequisite NEUR courses. Students will also strengthen skills in experimental design and scientific writing.
(Sponsoring Dept.: BIOL). Acceptable toward Biological Sciences Specialization Areas: CEBG (Cell Biology), GENB (Cell Biology, Development, Physiology), and PHNB. Students must pay a $40.00 lab fee.
BSCV
CIVICUS
BSCV302
(Perm Req)
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: BSCV301.
Restriction: Sophomore standing or higher. Must be in the CIVICUS Program.
Capstone course required for CIVICUS citation. Through a supervised internship, students gain hands-on experience in an area related to civic engagement, which gives students authentic experiences that help them develop hard and soft skills to support their community engagement efforts and their work toward social good.
By permission of instructor.
BSOS
Behavioral and Social Sciences
BSOS355
(Perm Req)
Social Sciences Internship Practicum
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must have earned a minimum of 60 credits; and minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5; and must have completed at least 1 semester at UMD.
Credit only granted for: BSOS388I or BSOS355.
Formerly: BSOS388I.
BSOS 355 is an internship course open to all majors. It will enable students to articulate and apply the scholarship from the discipline related to their specific internship placement into a real-work environment.
CCJS
Criminology and Criminal Justice Department Site
CCJS300
(Perm Req)
Criminological and Criminal Justice Research Methods
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: CCJS100 and CCJS105; and (PSYC200, CCJS200, ECON321, BMGT230, or SOCY201).
Introduction to the formulation of research questions covering crime and justice, research designs, data collection, and interpretation and reporting in criminological and justice-system settings.
CLAS
Classics Department Site
CLAS321
Science & Society in Ancient Greece & Rome
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP
How did ancient Greek and Roman scientific practices differ from and resemble our own? How do we as historians recognize when someone is conducting scientific inquiry? What were the social and cultural contexts of scientific production in the ancient world? With a focus on the scientific practices and products of ancient Greeks and Romans from around the fifth century BCE to the second century CE, we investigate how several scientific disciplines -- including medicine, astronomy, and biology --developed under the influence of ancient social and cultural contexts, and how ancient literatures, in turn, were shaped by those working in scientific fields of inquiry. In addressing these questions special attention will be paid to the methods employed by the available sources of ancient scientists and the modes of demonstration, argumentation, and rhetoric employed in scientific texts. Readings of primary materials will be supplemented with selections of secondary scholarship.
CMSC
Computer Science Department Site
CMSC115
Gender, Race and Computing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have taken CMSC216 or higher.
Cross-listed with: WGSS115.
Credit only granted for: WGSS115 or CMSC115.
Race and gender have shaped computing from its earliest histories to contemporary debates over bias in search algorithms, surveillance, and AI. As computational processes shape ever more dimensions of everyday life from the personal to the global scale, understanding how they operate and how power operates within them grows ever more important. Combating racism and sexism is not as simple as ensuring the pool of programmers and engineers is more diverse; structures of power are embedded in digital technologies as they are in all aspects of our society, and we must learn to perceive their operation if we hope to transform them. We will examine how racism and sexism operate in the field of computer science and in everyday uses of digital technologies, while studying how feminist and racial justice movements have created alternative approaches. This class is for anyone who wishes to better understand the relationships between digital technology, structural power, and social justice.
CMSC116
You and I, and Generative AI
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Restriction: Must not have completed CMSC216 or higher.
This course will explore whether and how generative AI can be developed to support human values and promote human autonomy, and how the context of the deployment of AI may impact answers to this question. Entire industries are being transformed by AI technology, much of which is driven by the recent meteoric advances in generative AI: the variety of AI that produces full content, such as documents, images, speech, and video. These advances have enabled many people to do things they previously were incapable of - such as essay writing or adding special effects to home movies - but have also brought about a series of ethical questions around their development and use - such as the role of AI in Hollywood brought into the public eye through the 2023 writer's strike. These developments raise fundamental questions around whether it is even possible to develop generative AI technology that empowers rather than replaces people, and which serves human values such as rights, justice, and dignity. It also raises the question: Is generative AI different from other technologies that can be used toward both positive and negative ends? Different disciplines have different ways of answering questions around human values, whether it's the social sciences, the humanities, or computer science. In this course, you will not only learn about the challenges of developing values-centered generative AI technology, but also actively participate in crafting tomorrow's solutions.
Restriction: Must not have completed CMSC216 or higher.
CMSC122
Introduction to Computer Programming via the Web
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must not have completed any courses from CMSC131-499 course range; and must not be concurrently enrolled in CMSC131.
Credit only granted for: CMSC106, or CMSC122.
Introduction to computer programming in the context of developing full featured dynamic web sites. Uses a problem solving approach to teach basics of program design and implementation using JavaScript; relates these skills to creation of dynamic web sites; then explores both the potential and limits of web-based information sources for use in research. Intended to help relate a student's major to these emerging technologies.
CMSC125
Introduction to Computing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in MATH115 or higher.
Restriction: Must not be in the Computer Science program; and must not have completed any courses from CMSC131-499; and must not have completed BMGT302, IMDM127 or INST126.
Credit only granted for: IMDM127 or CMSC125.
Introduces you to the computing field as a whole. You will gain skills used across the spectrum of computing majors and learn about the great variety of routes into the various areas of study and employment in technological fields.
COMM
Communication Department Site
COMM385
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: COMM385 or COMM498I (Spring 2014).
Formerly: COMM498I (Spring 2014).
Explores contemporary theories of influence and their implications for communication practice. Topics include power and influence, logical theory, rhetorical theory, persuasion theory, framing theory, social influence theory, and propagation of influence in mediated social networks.
COMM386
(Perm Req)
Experiential Learning
Credits: 3 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Permission of ARHU-Communication department.
Restriction: Junior standing or higher; and must be in Communication program.
Supervised internship experience with communication professionals. Relation of academic training to professional experience.
CPET
College Park Scholars-Environment, Technology & Economy
CPET101
College Park Scholars: Environment, Technology & Economy First-Year Colloquium II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Prerequisite: CPET100.
Restriction: Students must be enrolled in the College Park Scholars Environment, Technology & Economy (CPET) program.
Introductory colloquium II: Continued examination of issues related to the convergence of the environment, technology and the economy. Group projects in sustainable development.
CPJT
College Park Scholars-Justice and Legal Thought
CPJT230
Capstone for Justice and Legal Thought: Internship
Credits: 2 - 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
The capstone of the four-semester College Park Scholars Justice and Legal thought citation program is an exploration of justice and law within a rigorous academic and experiential framework. Students must develop and perform practicum internships in professional law related settings. In all settings, students must interact directly with legal professionals in law related fields and through law-related institutions under the supervision of legal professionals and program staff. In conjunction with the experiential component, students will synthesize their experience within the learning outcomes of the Justice and Legal Thought Program through an innovative final project culminating in a poster presentation.
CPJT240
Capstone for Justice and Legal Thought: Service-Learning
Credits: 2
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
The capstone of the four-semester College Park Scholars Justice and Legal Thought citation program is an exploration of justice and law within a rigorous academic and experiential framework. Students must develop and perform practicum volunteer experiences in professional law related settings. In all settings, students must interact directly with legal professionals in law related fields and through law-related institutions under the supervision of legal professionals and program staff. In conjunctions with the experiential component, students will synthesize their experience within the learning outcomes of the Justice and Legal Thought program through an innovative final project culminating in a poster presentation.
CPJT250
Capstone for Justice and Legal Thought: Research
Credits: 2
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
The capstone of the four-semester College Park Scholars Justice and Legal Thought citation program is an exploration of justice and law within a rigorous academic and experiential framework. Students must develop and perform applied research in a law related setting. Students must interact directly with legal professionals under the supervision of program staff. Students will synthesize their experience within the learning outcomes of the Justice and Legal Thought Program through an innovative final research project culminating in a poster presentation.
CPSA
College Park Scholars-Arts
CPSA240
College Park Scholars: Arts Service-Learning Practicum
Credits: 2
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: CPSA200.
Restriction: Students must be matriculated into the College Park Scholars Arts (CPSA) program.
Additional information: When paired with successful completion of CPSA 200, students will earn General Education Scholarship-in-Practice credit.
Supervised Service-Learning project in an area related to the arts.
CPSA250
College Park Scholars: Arts Research Practicum
Credits: 2
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: CPSA200.
Restriction: Students must be matriculated into the College Park Scholars Arts (CPSA) program.
Additional information: When paired with successful completion of CPSA 200, students will earn General Education Scholarship-in-Practice credit.
Supervised research project in an area related to the arts.
CPSA260
College Park Scholars: Arts Peer-Teaching Practicum
Credits: 2
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: CPSA200.
Restriction: Students must be matriculated into the College Park Scholars Arts (CPSA) program.
Additional information: When paired with successful completion of CPSA 200, students will earn General Education Scholarship-in-Practice credit.
Supervised peer-teaching project in an area related to the arts.
CPSP
College Park Scholars Program Department Site
CPSP339P
Advanced Practicum: Internship
Credits: 1 - 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
CPSP359G
Advanced Practicum: Research
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
CPSP359S
Advanced Practicum: Research
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
CPSS
College Park Scholars-Science, Technology and Society
CPSS240
College Park Scholars: Science, Technology & Society - Service-Learning Practicum
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Restriction: Matriculation into the College Park Scholars Science, Technology & Society (CPSS) program; or permission of instructor.
Supervised Service-Learning practicum in issues related to science, technology and society.
Most of the class times will be spent at area Prince George's schools with partnering robotics teams. Consult the class requirements and locations provided in the syllabus at the beginning of the class.

This course requires a $61 background check fee for working in Prince George's County K-12 schools.
CPSS340
College Park Scholars: Infrastructure and Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must be currently enrolled in a College Park Scholars program.
Credit only granted for: CPSP349T or CPSS340.
Formerly: CPSP349T.
One of the most important, and underappreciated, aspects of our society is its infrastructure (roads, buildings, communication systems, water delivery systems, sanitation systems, energy systems, etc.). We often take for granted the services infrastructure bring us. As a consequence, the United States, which at one time was a world leader in creating infrastructure, is experiencing an infrastructure crisis. Furthermore, not everyone experiences this issue equally. This course is designed to identify the root causes of the crisis. You will explore emerging social, political, legal, cultural, and social justice issues associated with the building and maintenance of infrastructure from the perspective of Science and Technology Studies (STS) and engineers. You will work with a volunteer corps of professional engineers from a variety of disciplines on a service-learning project designed to assess the safety and vitality of infrastructure.
DANC
DANC200
Introduction to Dance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
A study of dance as a form of communication and as an art form; a survey of the theories and styles of dance, and their relationships to other art forms.
ECON
Economics Department Site
ECON354
Using Big Data to Solve Economic and Social Problems
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ECON200 and ECON201; and 1 course with a minimum grade of C- from (STAT100, ECON230, BMGT230, ECON321, STAT400, or other equivalent course).
Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Economics Bachelor of Arts; Economics Bachelor of Science).
Shows how "big data" can be used to understand and address some of the most important social and economic problems of our time. The course will give students an introduction to frontier research and policy applications in economics and social science in a less-technical manner. Topics include equality of opportunity, education, racial disparities, innovation and entrepreneurship, health care, climate change, criminal justice, and tax policy. In the context of these topics, the course will also provide an introduction to basic methods in data science, including regression, causal inference, and machine learning.
Students will need a laptop during discussion sections. If needed, students can borrow laptops through the university libraries. Click Here here .
EDCP
Education Counseling and Personnel Services Department Site
EDCP210
Peer Counseling Skills and Mental Health Advocacy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must not have completed EDCP310; and must not have completed PSYC433.
Credit only granted for: EDCP210, EDCP310, or PSYC433.
Introduction to core helping skills in peer counseling settings and three predominant theoretical approaches used in the counseling field (humanistic, psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral). The course also explores mental health stigma and advocacy. Students will build an understanding of the practical application of underlying principles and theory in counseling and the helping professions, while exploring their own, and societal, biases, assumptions, and attitudes toward mental health.
EDCP230
The Science and Practice of Happiness and Psychological Well-Being
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP
An introduction to theory and research on positive psychology, subjective well-being, and the psychology of happiness. This will include examination of hedonic and eudaimonic models of well-being and sociocultural understandings of happiness, together with how it relates to health, relationships, money, religion, work, and social media. Students will also explore common misconceptions and myths about happiness and well-being and will engage in a variety of activities designed to deepen their understanding of happiness in their own lives and broader societal trends related to well-being.
EDHD
Education, Human Development Department Site
EDHD220
(Perm Req)
Exploring Early Childhood General and Special Education
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Permission of EDUC-Human Development and Quantitative Methodology department.
Students who are considering a career in education will consider information about the teaching profession. Students reflect on their personal strengths, identify areas of growth, and examine their predisposition to work with young children with and without disabilities. They will discuss the nature of teaching, the moral and philosophic underpinnings that influenced their decision to enter into the teaching professions, as well as the roles and responsibilities of teachers and the characteristics and qualities for effective teachers (teaching styles and teacher's primary role in the classroom).
Students should allow an appropriate amount of travel time from the off-campus experience to your classes meeting on campus.
EDHD228
(Perm Req)
Research Experiences in Human Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Contact department for information to register for this course.
EDSP
Education, Special Department Site
EDSP220
Disability in Community: Access, Accommodation, and Adaptation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, DVCC
Examines the concept of disability in a variety of community settings. Drawing on classic and contemporary readings in psychology, sociology and special education, the course will couple conceptual and historical understanding of disability with first-hand service-learning experiences in the community. Students will develop a plan in several phases that encompasses principles of Universal Design for Living/Learning (UDL) to study and participate in community-based activities.
EDSP311
Peer Mentor Training and Certification
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Provides opportunities and training to facilitate inclusion of students with ID/DD on campus as a peer mentor. Students will develop understanding of disabilities and other conditions that could affect learning and other activities and learn ways to assist and build friendship through a mentor-mentee relationship.
EDUC
Education
EDUC388
(Perm Req)
Special Topics in Education; Guided Experiences in College Teaching
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Restricted to students approved as undergraduate teaching assistants. Section 0101 is reserved for standard UTA program and should be taken concurrently with EDUC498, 0101 for one credit.
EDUC388C
(Perm Req)
Special Topics in Education; Guided Experience in Teaching for Peer Educators
Credits: 1
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
EDUC388T
(Perm Req)
Special Topics in Education; Guided Experiences in College Teaching - UTA
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
ENES
Engineering Science
ENES100
(Perm Req)
Introduction to Engineering Design
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Must have math eligibility for MATH140 or higher.
Students work as teams to design and build a product using computer software for word-processing, spreadsheet, CAD, and communication skills.
Credit granted for ENES100 or ENES100A.

Non-engineering students can enroll for ENES100A and must request permis sion to do so at eng.umd.edu/keystone/courses.
ENES100A
(Perm Req)
Introduction to Engineering Design
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Must have math eligibility for MATH140 or higher.
Students work as teams to design and build a product using computer software for word-processing, spreadsheet, CAD, and communication skills.
Restricted to non-engineering students. Credit granted for ENES100 or ENES100A.
ENES140
Discovering New Ventures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Additional information: This course may count as an elective for a student at the University of Maryland, depending on the student's specific degree program. It cannot be counted towards the requirements for the Smith School of Business Entrepreneurship Fellow Program.
Students explore dynamic company startup topics by working in teams to design a new venture. This multi-disciplinary course helps students to learn the basic business, strategy, and leadership skills needed to launch new ventures. Topics include learning how to assess the feasibility of a startup venture, as well as how to apply best practices for planning, launching, and managing new companies. Students discuss a wide range of issues of importance and concern to entrepreneurs and learn to recognize opportunities, assess the skills and talents of successful entrepreneurs, and learn models that help them navigate uncertainty.
All questions regarding this course should be directed to mtecheducation@umd.edu.

A Fearless Ideas Course from the Academy for Innovation & Entrepreneurship (AIE): http://ter.ps/iamFEARLESS Click here for more information on the Fearless Ideas Courses.
ENES190H
Introduction to Design and Quality
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must be in the Quest program.
Cross-listed with: BMGT190.
Credit only granted for: BMGT190 or ENES190.
QUEST students learn and apply design practices to design new products and services. Working in multidisciplinary teams, students use quality and process improvement methods to identify, analyze, and recommend solutions to real-world problems.
Cross-listed with BMGT190H. Credit granted for BMGT190H or ENES190H.
ENES192
Engineering For Us All
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: MATH107.
Additional information: Recommended for non-engineering majors.
Students are challenged to uncover hidden valuable connections among a variety of disciplines, while creatively seeking and solving problems as a team. Students learn and practice skills for how groups function and identify innovation while addressing the tensions between our inherent drives to seek and solve, to share, and to sell.
ENES210
Entrepreneurial Opportunity Analysis and Decision-Making in 21st Century Technology Ventures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENES210 or ENES461.
This multi-disciplinary course helps students learn the principles of entrepreneurial opportunity analysis and decision-making in an increasingly dynamic and technically-inclined society. Emphasis is placed on how aspiring technology entrepreneurs can develop their entrepreneurial perspectives to develop winning entrepreneurial plans for their future ventures.
All questions regarding this course should bedirected to mtecheducation@umd.edu.
ENES240
Ethical, Policy and Social Implications of Science and Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Restriction: Must be in the Science, Technology, Ethics and Policy minor.
Cross-listed with: PLCY240.
Credit only granted for: ENES240 or PLCY240.
Asks students to think about how society should manage complexity, transformation, and uncertainty with an eye on developing a broader sense of ethics and social responsibility. Introduces analytical frameworks, concepts, and data collection techniques that interdisciplinary scholars use to map relationships among science, technology and society and generate important questions about the future of society.
ENES317
Introduction to Leadership in Engineering, Science, and Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must be in the Minor in Global Engineering Leadership(#EN09).
Additional information: Students not meeting restriction requirements should add themselves to the course holdfile. Restrictions DO NOT apply to winter and summer terms.
Develop a comprehensive overview and introduction to leadership and organizational development. Students will reflect on their own leadership experiences, develop a strong foundational knowledge of leadership theory, and advance their capacities in effectively leading teams. Students will connect leadership theory to practice by engaging in case study analysis and critique leadership practices enacted within engineering and technology settings. Students will complete self-assessments to better understand their own leadership strengths and refine their approaches to leadership by incorporating theories covered in this course.
ENES490H
QUEST Capstone Professional Practicum
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ENES390 or BMGT390.
Cross-listed with: BMGT490.
Credit only granted for: BMGT490 or ENES490.
The capstone course for the QUEST Honors Program provides students with an opportunity to learn in multidisciplinary teams of business, engineering, and science students in a real-world setting. Companies engage teams of QUEST students with real organizational challenges and dedicate resources to help students address these problems. Student teams must enhance their skills in quality management, process improvement, and systems design and will apply these to add value to a client. In the process, students will improve their teamwork skills.
Restricted to QUEST program students. Cross-listed with BMGT490H. Credit granted for BMGT490H or ENES490H.
ENGL
English Department Site
ENGL271
Writing Poems and Stories: An Introductory Workshop
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Introduction to theory and practice of writing fiction and poetry. Emphasis on critical reading of literary models. Exercises and workshop discussions with continual reference to modeling, drafting, and revising as necessary stages in a creative process.
ENGL272
Writing Fiction: A Beginning Workshop
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Introduction to theory and practice of writing fiction. Emphasis on critical reading of literary models. Exercises and workshop discussions with continual reference to modeling, drafting, and revising as necessary stages in a creative process.
ENGL273
Writing Poetry: A Beginning Workshop
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Introduction to theory and practice of writing poetry. Emphasis on critical reading of literary models. Exercises and workshop discussions with continual reference to modeling, drafting, and revising as necessary stages in a creative process.
ENGL275
Scriptwriting for Theater, Film, and Television
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Cross-listed with: ARHU275.
Credit only granted for: ENGL275 or ARHU275.
Introduction to the theory and practice of scriptwriting with an opportunity to read, view, evaluate, write, and revise texts meant to be performed. Students will practice writing for the stage, film, and television and also examine selected scripts, performances, and film and television clips as models for their own creative work. Students will complete frequent writing exercises, participate in workshops, and learn to apply scholarship to the analysis and critique of scripts.
ENGL290
Introduction to Digital Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Introductory course in digital studies. Surveys contemporary humanities work in digital technologies, including the web and social media and their historical antecedents. Explores design and making as analytical tools alongside reading and writing. Situates digital media within power and politics and develops critical awareness of how media shape society and ethics. Interdisciplinary approaches to creativity, analysis, and technology. While the course will include hands-on practice, no prior experience of programming, designing, or making required other than a willingness to experiment and play.
ENGL292
Writing for Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Prerequisite: Permission of ARHU-English department.
Recommended: ENGL101.
Restriction: Requires application and references.
Jointly offered with: ENGL388C.
Credit only granted for: ENGL292 or ENGL388C.
Service learning in collaboration with students at area high schools. Explores how writing can be a tool for social change. Participants serve as mentors, create a performance event concerning a pressing social issue, and compose reflections, literacy narratives, publicity materials, and a multimodal project. Focus on developing critical self-awareness.
Jointly offered with ENGL388C. Credit granted ENGL292 or ENGL388C.
ENGL293
Writing in the Wireless World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Recommended: ENGL101.
A hands-on exploration of writing at the intersection of technology and rhetoric. Students will learn to read, analyze, and compose the kinds of multimodal documents--documents combining text, image, and sound--that constitute communication in our digital world.
ENGL294
Persuasion and Cleverness in Social Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Prerequisite: Must have satisfied Fundamental Studies Academic Writing requirement.
Exploration of various persuasive media encountered in daily life through the lens of rhetorical and critical theories. Principles of rhetoric and analysis of how persuasion functions across media. Invention of effective multimedia works appropriate to purpose, audience, and context. Concepts from cultural studies used to develop critical awareness about power and ideology and how they influence the way people produce and understand messages. By integration of technology, rhetoric, and cultural studies, students become more critically-rhetorically informed thinkers, authors, and audiences of arguments and culture in the digital age. Writing intensive course. No prior multimedia experience is expected.
ENGL295
Introduction to Digital Storytelling and Poetics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
What is the thread weaving through an animated visualization of economic data in a popular newspaper, an indie text-based videogame, a saucy twitter bot spitting out haikus, and an interactive digital essay? Storytelling--using whatever is at hand to communicate with audiences in evocative and connected ways. Combining technical and textual analysis with their own experiments in digital composition, students will learn to use new media techniques for the interpretation, creation, and dissemination of both critical and imaginative writing. From branching narratives to hypertext media and video games, to more recent developments in machine-generated poetry, XR, and embodied and location-based narrative, the methods and materials in this introductory course link creative expression and analysis of texts to contemporary conversations about social difference, representation, interface, and computation.
ENGL297
Research and Writing in the Workplace
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ENGL101.
Introduction to the rhetorical principles and professional practices of professional writing, particularly the research, writing, communication, analytical, and technological skills needed for the Professional Writing minor. How culture and technology relate to the work of professional writing; design principles and rhetorical moves; digital tools, research skills, and writing strategies of professional writers. Develops skills needed to publish a writing portfolio that showcases students' professional writing competencies and projects their professional writer identities.
ENGL361
Recovering Oral Histories
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Prerequisite: Students must have completed one course in English, Latin American Studies, or Education.
Service-learning course that gives students an opportunity to develop writing, interviewing, and communication skills as they contribute to the work of a community organization. In the classroom, students will reflect on the process and do background research to understand the particular context of the organization's work. In the field, students will interview (or have informal discussions with) young people helped by the organization in order to construct a narrative about their lives, their perceptions of themselves, and their experiences.
ENGL388C
(Perm Req)
Writing for Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Prerequisite: Permission of ARHU-English Department .
Recommended: ENGL101.
Restriction: Requires application and references.
Jointly offered with: ENGL292.
Credit only granted for: ENGL292 or ENGL388C.
Service learning in collaboration with students at area high schools. Explores how writing can be a tool for social change. Participants serve as mentors, create a performance event concerning a pressing social issue, and compose reflections, literacy narratives, and publicity materials. Students also design individual projects that link course content and students' own professional interests.
ENGL388M
(Perm Req)
Maryland General Assembly Writing Internship
Credits: 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ENGL381 or HONR368A.
Restriction: Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0; and must have earned a minimum of 60 credits; and must be admitted to the MGA program.
Cross-listed with: HONR379W.
Credit only granted for: ENGL388M or HONR379W.
Experiential learning at the Maryland General Assembly (early January through early April). Interns participate in standard office tasks, research legislative issues, and draft legislative texts such as constituent letters, notes on bills, newsletters, policy memos, and testimony. Specific assignments vary according to the host legislator's needs and the intern's schedule.
Cross-listed with HONR379W. Credit granted for ENGL388M or HONR379W.
ENGL388P
(Perm Req)
English Careers Internship
Credits: 1 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Permission of ARHU-English department. Repeatable to 12 credits if content differs.
Additional information: Each enrolled credit equals 45 hours of on-site internship work.
Students receive credit for an internship of their choice that focuses at least half of its work on core English skills such as writing, editing, and research. Students secure their own internship placements. Course assignments include, for instance, an activity log, reflection papers, a supervisor evaluation, and a final portfolio of work.
Prerequisite: permission of the department. Contact english@umd.edu.
ENGL388V
(Perm Req)
Undergraduate Teaching Assistants in English
Credits: 1 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Permission of the ARHU-English department. Repeatable to 12 credits.
Additional information: Students should consult with the UTA Coordinator to determine the number of enrollment credits.
A weekly teaching practicum and concurrent internship as an undergraduate teaching assistant in an English course. Students will explore the theories and best practices of teaching and learning in the various fields of the English discipline, particularly writing and literary studies. The emphasis is on creating inclusive classrooms and working with diverse learners and is grounded in theories of critical pedagogy. Students will apply principles of learning theory to develop and facilitate learner-centered lessons and discussions. They will also study composition pedagogy in preparation for responding to student writing in the course for which they are an assistant.
Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 12 credits. Contact Lyra Hilliard, lyrahill@umd.edu. Students taking ENGL388V for the first time should register for either section 0101 or 0401 for 4 credits. When taking the course again in subsequent semesters, students should register for 2001 or 3001 for 3 credits."
ENGL388W
(Perm Req)
Writing Center Internship
Credits: 1 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Permission of the Writing Center (1205 Tawes Hall). Repeatable to 12 credits.
Cross-listed with: SPAN388W.
Credit only granted for: ENGL388W or SPAN388W.
Examines face-to-face and online writing center theory and practice through readings, exercises, and supervised tutoring. Students investigate the writing process and help other writers to negotiate it.
Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 12 credits. To apply, go to http://www.english.umd.edu/academics/writingcenter/ internship. Cross-listed with SPAN388W. Credit only greanted for ENGL388W or SPAN388W.

Students taking ENGL388W for the first time should register for section 0101 for 4 credits. When taking the course a gain in subsequent semesters, students should register for 2001.
ENSP
Environmental Science and Policy Department Site
ENSP400
(Perm Req)
Capstone in Environmental Science and Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ENSP101; and ENSP102.
Restriction: Must be in Environmental Science and Policy program; and senior standing; and permission of the Environmental Science and Policy Program.
Integration of physical, biological, and social sciences with applications to environmental science and policy. Problem-solving and multi-disciplinary case study evaluations pertinent to contemporary and future issues related to the environment.
ENST
Environmental Science and Technology Department Site
ENST472
(Perm Req)
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must be in a major within AGNR-Environmental Science & Technology department; and permission of AGNR-Environmental Science & Technology department.
Additional information: This is the pinnacle course for students majoring in ENST and is therefore recommended in one of the students' final semesters.
This capstone course focuses on professional project preparation, presentation, and critical evaluation on environmental science research. Students will develop and present original projects and critique projects presented by others.
ENST486
(Perm Req)
Senior Professional Experience
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ENST389.
Restriction: Must be in the Environmental Science and Technology program; and permission of AGNR-Environmental Science & Technology department.
Additional information: The course has two types of activities: lecture and experiential learning. Students are expected to work on their professional-level experience for 90 hours and participate in a 2-hour lecture every other week, during the semester to develop their Senior Integrative Experience (SIE) project. Each student's research question, proposal methodology, analysis, paper, and presentation will follow learning outcomes of all ENST SIE course options.
Students will arrange an off-campus professional-level work experience related to Environmental Science and Technology (ENST) to develop expertise in a specific area of their ENST concentration curriculum. Classroom sessions will frame student experiences within the broader discipline of Environmental Science and Technology. This course will tie together current practices in the ENST career industry, proposal writing, critical analysis, and culminate in a final paper and presentation.
FGSM
Federal and Global Fellows
FGSM398
(Perm Req)
Federal and Global Experiential Learning
Credits: 3 - 9
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Cross-listed with HNUH398P. Credit only granted for FGSM398 or HNUH398P.
FMSC
Family Science Department Site
FMSC302
Research Methods in Family Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP
Prerequisite: Must have completed an introductory statistics course.
Restriction: Must be in a major within SPHL-Family Science department.
Credit only granted for: FMSC302 or FMST302.
Formerly: FMST302.
Introduction to the methods of the social and behavioral sciences employed in family science. The role of theory, the development of hypotheses, measurement, design, and data analysis.
FMSC341
Personal and Family Finance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Credit only granted for: FMSC341 or FMST341.
Formerly: FMST341.
Individual and family financial strategies with emphasis on financial planning, savings, investments, insurance, income taxes, housing, and use of credit. Planning, analyzing, and controlling financial resources to resolve personal/family financial problems and to attain financial security.
GEMS
Gemstone
GEMS104
Topics in Science, Technology and Society (STS)
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Prerequisite: GEMS100.
Restriction: Must be in the Gemstone program.
An examination of how cultural, economic, political and social forces shape scientific and technological systems and, conversely, how scientific and technological systems have affected the culture, economies, organization and politics of societies. Students in the course will form small teams to carry out semester-long research on socio/technical topics related to the course theme chosen for that specific semester.
GEMS104 discussions will be various times through the week beginning January 24 and running through spring break on March 18. Beginning with week 9, March 28 (the week after spring break), GEMS104 lectures will continue to be on Tuesdays from 5-6:15pm and discussions will move to Thursdays (March 31 is the first Thursday) from 5-6:15pm.
GEMS497
Team Thesis Defense
Credits: 2
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: GEMS396.
Restriction: Must be in the Gemstone program.
Gemstone teams will complete the team research project and thesis. The team will formally present the thesis to experts in the area of interest at a Team Thesis Conference before final submission.
GEOG
Geographical Sciences Department Site
GEOG156
How NASA Sees the Earth
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Cross-listed with: INST156.
Credit only granted for: GEOG156 or INST156.
The world of Earth science data is complex and can be overwhelming with a wide range of data sources and formats, hefty downloads and the need for complicated analytical tools. To make use of enormous volumes of available data and geoinformation products, one has to know where and how to search and obtain the data, how to analyze the data, and how to extract useful information and knowledge. In this course, you will learn about the state-of-the-art Web-based tools that allow you to efficiently display and analyze a large number of datasets in a way many professionals working in the Earth science domain would. You will learn how to visualize multiple Earth science datasets produced by NASA in a variety of ways directly on the Internet, without the need to download, manage and store them. Students will be introduced to comprehensive functions to analyze the data and generate customized maps, animations, multi-variable correlations, regional subsetting, etc.
GEOL
Geology Department Site
GEOL394
(Perm Req)
Geology Senior Thesis II: Research
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: GEOL393; and must have completed at least three upper level GEOL courses.
Restriction: Must be in Geology program; and junior standing or higher.
The second semester of the two-semester Geology Senior Thesis. Investigation of specific original research question in geosciences. Emphasis is on completion of original research proposed in GEOL393 and presentation of results both in writing and in public presentations that adhere to geosciences professional standards.
Contact department for information to register for this course.
GREK
GREK301
Scenes from Athenian Life
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Credit only granted for: GREK301 or GREK351.
Formerly: GREK351.
Makes the transition from study of Greek grammar to reading. Focus on selected aspects of life in Athens: marriage, friendship, the courts, festival, theatre. Reading short works by three authors: Lysias, Plato, and a playwright (e.g., Menander). Readings are in ancient Greek.
GVPT
Government and Politics Department Site
GVPT201
Scope and Methods for Political Science Research
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Credit only granted for: GVPT100 or GVPT201.
Formerly: GVPT100.
An introduction to empirical research in political science.
GVPT241
The Study of Political Philosophy: Ancient and Modern
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Examines some of the salient continuities and breaks between the ancient and modern traditions in Western political philosophy.
GVPT273
Introduction to Environmental Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
An overview of modern environmental philosophy, politics, and policy, exploring environmental politics in the US by way of comparison with other developed and developing countries.
GVPT356
(Perm Req)
Capstone in International Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVCC
Prerequisite: GVPT354.
Restriction: Enrollment is restricted to students in the Minor in International Development and Conflict Management; and sophomore standing or higher; and permission of BSOS-Government & Politics department.
Serves as one of the two capstone courses for the Minor in International Development and Conflict Management. Focuses on advanced theory and the practice and profession of international development and is designed to provide students an introduction to, and a chance to engage with, a core set of practical skills relevant to the field.

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HACS
ACES-Cybersecurity
HACS208E
(Perm Req)
Introduction to Reverse Engineering
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living-Learning Program.
An introduction to software reverse engineering tools and methodologies. Fundamental topics will be introduced: compilers, linkers, loaders, assembly language, as well as static and dynamic analysis tools. We will motivate some reasons for software reverse engineering and examine the background material necessary for an understanding of the subject. This will include computer architecture and low-level systems programming, as well as an introduction to x86_64 assembly language. We will apply this newly acquired knowledge while learning about static and dynamic analysis tools used by practitioners of software reverse engineering.
HACS208I
Security Incident Handling and Management
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living-Learning Program.
Examines the many roles, capabilities, organizations, and objectives involved in security incident handling and management. Core course content includes three major components: learning about the skill sets that people use, participating in role playing exercises that increasingly build upon this knowledge, and finally conducting exercises in a lab environment simulating security incident discovery, handling, and management.
Restriction: Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living-Learning Program. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs.
HACS287
(Perm Req)
Undergraduate Research in Cybersecurity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living-Learning Program; and permission of UGST-HCOL-ACES Cybersecurity Program.
The Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students (ACES) program encourages its students to engage in research in order to gain greater insight into a specific area within cybersecurity, obtain an appreciation for the subtleties and difficulties associated with the production of knowledge and fundamental new applications, and to prepare for graduate school and the workforce.
Contact department for information to register for this course.
HDCC
Design Cultures and Creativity
HDCC209A
Capstone in Design Cultures and Creativity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
HDCC209B
Capstone in Design Cultures and Creativity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
HDCC209C
Capstone in Design Cultures and Creativity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
HDCC209D
Capstone in Design Cultures and Creativity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
HESP
Hearing and Speech Sciences Department Site
HESP120
Introduction to Linguistics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP
Additional information: HESP120 is required for HESP majors. HESP majors may not substitute LING200.
An introduction to the scientific study of natural language with focus on the basic concepts of phonology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics, with subsequent attention to the applied aspects of linguistic principles.
HHUM
Honors Humanities Department Site
HHUM106
Honors Humanities: The Humanities in Practice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Recommended: HHUM105.
Restriction: Must be in the Honors Humanities Program.
Additional information: Priority enrollment will be given to students in Honors Humanities.
The application of the disciplines, methods and traditions of the Humanities to contemporary problems and issues such as social injustice, immigration, income inequality, and the role of social media. Students will apply to such issues the tools of the Humanities: research and historical analysis, critical reasoning, communication and persuasion, ethical debate, and imagination. The course will utilize the institutions of Washington, D.C. to explore contemporary problems and will guide students in the creation of their individual proposals for the capstone project that is the culmination of the curriculum in Honors Humanities.
HHUM206
Honors Humanities Keystone Project
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Design, execution and completion of students' chosen Keystone Projects in the form of research, creativity, or service. Students will have formulated tentative plans for their projects in HHUM106; in this course they will revise and augment those proposals, articulate their connections with the traditions and methods of the humanities, formulate a work plan for completing the project within one semester, and work with their fellow students to workshop their materials as they develop. The course will culminate in a presentation of the project at the annual Keystone Symposium and with the submission of the project in its final form.
HIST
History Department Site
HIST396
(Perm Req)
Honors Colloquium II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Permission of ARHU-History department; or HIST395.
Restriction: Must be in History program.
Uses a seminar approach to examine a major problem of historical interpretation across two or more diverse cultures in different periods. Topics vary and include: religion and society, the city in history, gender, slavery and emancipation, and modernization.
HIST408B
(Perm Req)
Senior Seminar; What Does Government Do? The State in American History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Permission of department.
HIST408J
(Perm Req)
Senior Seminar; Gender and Sexuality in Early Modern Europe
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Permission of department.

Recent years have witnessed an explosion of research on gender and sexuality in early modern Europe (1500-1800). This seminar will explore this challenging historiography and students will write an historiographical essay on a subject of their choosing.
HIST408W
(Perm Req)
Senior Seminar; The Rise and Fall of the Slave South
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Permission of department.

Capstone readings seminar for history majors. Explores the rise, maturation and ultimate destruction of the slave South by examining its constituent elements--slaves, slaveholders, yeoman farmers, white nonslaveholders, free people of African descent--and the sources of cohesion and conflict among them.
HIST408Y
(Perm Req)
Senior Seminar; Jewish Women in Modernity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Permission of department. Exploration of the role of Jewish women in the process of Jewish modernin and the impact of modernization on Jewish women in Europe and America e nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
HIST465
Oral History of Immigration
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVCC
Credit only granted for: HIST428M or HIST465.
Formerly: HIST428M.
Uses oral history to explore experiences of migrants to the Washington, D.C. area since the mid-twentieth century in projects based on engagement with local immigrants.
HLTH
HLTH391
(Perm Req)
Making a Difference: Applying Community Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: SPHL100, HLTH124, HLTH140, HLTH200, HLTH230, EPIB301, EPIB315, BSCI170, BSCI201, and HLTH302. Students must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in HLTH364.
Corequisite: HLTH420 and HLTH490.
Restriction: Must be in a major within the SPHL-Behavioral and Community Health department.
The exploration and application of community health concepts including theoretical models, advocacy, cultural competency, asset mapping, and needs assessment. Includes planning, implementing and evaluating a community health program with a designated community partner.
HLTH391H
(Perm Req)
Making a Difference: Applying Community Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: SPHL100, HLTH124, HLTH140, HLTH200, HLTH230, EPIB301, EPIB315, BSCI170, BSCI201, and HLTH302. Students must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in HLTH364.
Corequisite: HLTH420 and HLTH490.
Restriction: Must be in a major within the SPHL-Behavioral and Community Health department.
The exploration and application of community health concepts including theoretical models, advocacy, cultural competency, asset mapping, and needs assessment. Includes planning, implementing and evaluating a community health program with a designated community partner.
HNUH
University Honors
HNUH219P
Transform Maryland: Management Consulting Internship
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
This three-credit internship, open to all majors, offers a fully immersive consulting experience that affords undergraduate students the opportunity to engage with a real client. Working in dynamic teams, students learn advanced management consulting strategies, and apply critical thinking and solution design to real world cases, all while developing general professional acumen. The internship innovates real University of Maryland business processes. Managed by senior members of the DIT's Enterprise Planning and Continuous Improvement unit, the internship matches teams with top-tier professionals and a senior university administrator as a project client. Supported by professional coaching from practicing talent managers and management consultants, students research and benchmark against other schools, analyze and synthesize results, and formulate actionable recommendations for the client. The internship culminates in a recommendation pitch to campus leadership.
HNUH219P follows HUNH219T to complete the Transform Maryland Theory/Practice track.
HNUH229P
Climate in Crisis: Strategy and Advocacy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
This theory and practice track examines theoretical frameworks for understanding climate change and concrete cases that shed light on the complexity of managing it. In this, the practical component of the Climate in Crisis track, we explore several domestic energy and climate policy case studies, examining the competing roles played by various interest groups that influence legislative and regulatory outcomes, with a focus on differing organizational advocacy strategies. Once we have mastered organizational advocacy strategies, students bring those tools to bear on the most recent US Federal policy mandates and legislation. In 229T, students will complement this work with a deep dive into the nature of public goods and climate change policy, among other crucial considerations.
HNUH229P pairs with HNUH229T to complete the Climate in Crisis Theory/Practice track. This pair of courses can be taken in any order.
HNUH248B
Setting the Table: The Challenges and Opportunities for Sustainable Agriculture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
What will the farm of the future look like? Our current food system is plagued with paradoxes. An estimated 41.2 million Americans are classified as food insecure, but we produce 4,000 calories per person per day. Between 2008 and 2012, 1.6 million acres of long-term grasslands were converted to crop production, yet more than 350,000 acres of farmland were lost to development annually. This course will investigate what determines the food we eat and how we can make changes today that will improve both food access and the environment for future generations. Students will learn agribusiness, as well as alternative food movements and regenerative agriculture. They will meet experts from the USDA and Maryland producers. By growing their own vegetables, tracking food consumption, and exploring family history linked to farming, students will leave the course as conscious consumers empowered to navigate food system reform.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH248B is the required I-Series course in the Global Crises, Sustainable Futures thematic cluster. Global Crises, Sustainable Futures courses will be offered through Spring 2024.
HNUH258B
The Ecology of Childhood Poverty
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
How does poverty shape the relationship between humans and their environment? It may seem obvious that being poor in childhood has enduring effects on development. What is less obvious is how experiencing poverty in childhood shapes relationships between children and their surroundings, including family interactions, peer relationships, adult dynamics, and the health of the community. Less clear still is the extent to which positive interactions with caretakers and social supports can protect children from potential harm as they grow up. This course focuses on the complexity of poverty as a social force and community concern. Students will investigate the nature of poverty through an interdisciplinary lens that includes social theory, developmental psychology, and empirical studies. After analyzing various approaches to the study of child poverty, students will be in a position to use research on parenting and poverty to evaluate public policy and social programs in their own backyard.
HNUH258B is the required I-Series course in the Metamorphosis thematic cluster. Metamorphosis courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH258V
Collective Behavior in Natural and Artificial Systems
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
From fish schools to traffic jams, natural and artificial systems alike exhibit forms of collective behavior. In fact, the onset of collective behavior in a system of interacting individuals often corresponds to a period of broader transition in the system from a disordered to ordered state. Why do environments as diverse as the ocean and human society follow the same pattern of emergence? The course takes up this question through an exploration of physical and biological systems, such as insects and animal groups, and human crowds; and case studies in transportation, robotics, and social networks. Students will learn to model, analyze, predict, and even synthesize collective networks of all kinds using quantitative methods such as graph theory, dynamical systems theory, agent-based modeling, and data-driven approaches. No prior knowledge of systems theory or methodology is necessary.
This course is part of the Metamorphosis thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH258B to complete the cluster. Metamorphosis courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH398P
(Perm Req)
Federal and Global Experiential Learning
Credits: 3 - 9
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Permission of instructor. Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs.
Cross-listed with: FGSM398.
Credit only granted for: FGSM398 or HNUH398P.
This is the experiential course component of the Federal Fellows Program and Global Fellows Program.
Cross-listed with FGSM398. Credit only granted for FGSM398 or HNUH398P.
HONR
HONR379W
(Perm Req)
Maryland General Assembly Writing Internship
Credits: 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: ENGL381 or HONR368A.
Restriction: Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0; and must have earned a minimum of 60 credits; and must be admitted to the MGA program.
Cross-listed with: ENGL388M.
Credit only granted for: ENGL388M or HONR379W.
Experiential learning at the Maryland General Assembly (early January through early April). Interns participate in standard office tasks, research legislative issues, and draft legislative texts such as constituent letters, notes on bills, newsletters, policy memos, and testimony. Specific assignments vary according to the host legislator's needs and the intern's schedule.
Prerequisite: permission of department and completion of either ENGL381 or HONR368A. Cross-listed with ENGL388M. Credit granted for ENGL388M or HONR379W.
INAG
Institute of Applied Agriculture Department Site
INAG272
Principles of Arboriculture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Cross-listed with: PLSC272.
Credit only granted for: INAG272 or PLSC272.
The establishment and maintenance of healthy trees in an urban setting will be studied. Lectures will focus on the environmental constraints to tree development in the city, and the role of physiological processes in regulating tree vigor. Laboratory exercises will cover the unique aspects of urban soils, tree valuation procedures, pruning and training, and supervised climbing.
INST
Information Studies
INST123
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must not have completed or be currently taking INST327 or BMGT402.
An introduction to relational databases for students with no previous programming experience. Provides a means for students of diverse backgrounds to successfully learn how to store, retrieve, and maintain data in relational databases. Topics include a brief comparison of database systems with an emphasis on relational databases, fundamental relational database concepts, and data types. Includes technical approaches to accessing information stored in relational databases.
INST152
"Fake Checking": Battling Misinformation and Disinformation in the Real World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Examining the phenomenon of "fake news" using the principles of information literacy, students will develop their skills in locating, analyzing, and evaluating different information sources -- in the classroom, in their personal lives, and in the workplace.
INST156
How NASA Sees the Earth
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Cross-listed with: GEOG156.
Credit only granted for: GEOG156 or INST156.
The world of Earth science data is complex and can be overwhelming with a wide range of data sources and formats, hefty downloads and the need for complicated analytical tools. To make use of enormous volumes of available data and geoinformation products, one has to know where and how to search and obtain the data, how to analyze the data, and how to extract useful information and knowledge. In this course, you will learn about the state-of-the-art Web-based tools that allow you to efficiently display and analyze a large number of datasets in a way many professionals working in the Earth science domain would. You will learn how to visualize multiple Earth science datasets produced by NASA in a variety of ways directly on the Internet, without the need to download, manage and store them. Students will be introduced to comprehensive functions to analyze the data and generate customized maps, animations, multi-variable correlations, regional subsetting, etc.
INST327
Database Design and Modeling
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in INST126 or GEOG276.
Restriction: Must be in Information Science or Social Data Science program.
Credit only granted for: INST327 or BMGT402.
Introduction to databases, the relational model, entity-relationship diagrams, user-oriented database design and normalization, and Structured Query Language (SQL). Through labs, tests, and a project, students develop both theoretical and practical knowledge of relational database systems.
JOUR
Journalism Department Site
JOUR150
Introduction to Mass Communication
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP
Additional information: Not applicable toward journalism major.
Survey of the functions and effects of the mass media in the United States. A consumer's introduction to newspapers, television, radio, film, sound recording, books, magazines, and new media technology.
JOUR175
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Additional information: Not applicable toward journalism major.
An analysis of the information, values and underlying messages conveyed via television, newspapers, the internet, magazines, radio and film. Examines the accuracy of those messages and explores how media shape views of politics, culture and society.
Synchronous online meetings 1/24 from 6:30-8pm EST, 2/28 from 6:30-8pm EST, 4/3 from 6:30-8pm EST and 5/1 from 6:30-8pm EST.
JOUR289I
Information 3.0: Exploring Technological Tools
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Students will expand their understanding of various digital information and the issues it raises, evaluate media research investigating how users interact with information for different purposes, analyze how diverse audiences seek, select, share and produce various types of digital information, and evaluate the ethics related to digital privacy and security.
JOUR325
(Perm Req)
Capital News Service Bureau
Credits: 9
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: JOUR320; and permission of JOUR-Philip Merrill College of Journalism.
Advanced journalism training. Students report as part of college's Capital News Service program.
Washington, DC students should enroll in section 0101. Annapolis students should enroll in section 0201. College Park students should enroll in section 0301 and 0401.
JOUR327
(Perm Req)
Urban Affairs Reporting
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: JOUR320; and permission of instructor.
Jointly offered with JOUR627.
Credit only granted for: JOUR327 or JOUR627.
Students are immersed in coverage of issues affecting cities, working on a semester-long multi-platform reporting project based in Baltimore.
JOUR353
(Perm Req)
News Bureau: Multimedia Reporting
Credits: 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: JOUR352; and permission of JOUR-Philip Merrill College of Journalism; and (JOUR320 or JOUR360).
Advanced reporting and writing in an online environment focusing on multimedia, non-traditional storytelling and investigative reporting.
Contact instructor to obtain permission.
JOUR355
(Perm Req)
News Bureau: Multimedia Editing and Production