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Courses - Spring 2024
AASP
African American Studies Department Site
Open Seats as of
02/28/2024 at 10:30 PM
AASP100
Introduction to African American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Significant aspects of the history of African Americans with particular emphasis on the evolution and development of black communities from slavery to the present. Interdisciplinary introduction to social, political, legal and economic roots of contemporary problems faced by blacks in the United States with applications to the lives of other racial and ethnic minorities in the Americas and in other societies.
AASP100H
Introduction to African American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Significant aspects of the history of African Americans with particular emphasis on the evolution and development of black communities from slavery to the present. Interdisciplinary introduction to social, political, legal and economic roots of contemporary problems faced by blacks in the United States with applications to the lives of other racial and ethnic minorities in the Americas and in other societies.
Restricted to HONR students only.
AASP187
The New Jim Crow: African-Americans, Mass Incarceration and the Prison Industrial Complex
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Recommended: AASP100.
Students will examine the birth of the racial caste system following the abolition of slavery, the parallels between the racial hierarchy of the Jim Crow system and contemporary mass incarceration, and the rise of the prison industrial complex as a multi-billon business which thrives on the oppression of low-income populations and poor communities of color.
AASP202
Black Culture in the United States
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
The course examines important aspects of African American life and thought which are reflected in African American literature, drama, music and art. Beginning with the cultural heritage of slavery, the course surveys the changing modes of black creative expression from the 19th-century to the present.
AASP202H
Black Culture in the United States
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
The course examines important aspects of African American life and thought which are reflected in African American literature, drama, music and art. Beginning with the cultural heritage of slavery, the course surveys the changing modes of black creative expression from the 19th-century to the present.
AASP211
Get Out: The Sunken Place of Race Relations in the Post-Racial Era
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: AASP298G or AASP211.
Formerly: AASP298G.
Prevailing thought suggests that we live in an era that is post-racial, particularly after the election of Barack Obama. Media often serves to drive our assessment of where our nation stands on issues like race, gender and sexuality. This course uses the film Get Out to delve into the production, evolution and significance of race in present day America. The course will engage multiple forms of media to investigate life in "Post-Racial" America, including but not limited to the role of stereotypes, interracial relationships, police-community relations, etc.
AASP298L
African-American Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: ENGL234.
Credit only granted for: ENGL234 or AASP298L.
An exploration of the stories black authors tell about themselves, their communities, and the nation as informed by time and place, gender, sexuality, and class. African American perspective themes such as art, childhood, sexuality, marriage, alienation and mortality, as well as representations of slavery, Reconstruction, racial violence and the Nadir, legalized racism and segregation, black patriotism and black ex-patriots, the optimism of integration, and the prospects of a post-racial America.
Cross-listed with ENGL234. Credit granted for AASP298L or ENGL234.
AASP400
Directed Readings in African American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Prerequisite: AASP202 or AASP100.
The readings will be directed by the faculty of African American Studies. Topics to be covered will be chosen to meet the needs and interests of individual students.
AASP400H
Directed Readings in African American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Prerequisite: AASP202 or AASP100.
The readings will be directed by the faculty of African American Studies. Topics to be covered will be chosen to meet the needs and interests of individual students.
AAST
Asian American Studies Department Site
AAST200
Introduction to Asian American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AMST298C.
Credit only granted for: AAST200 or AMST298C.
The aggregate experience of Asian Pacific Americans, from developments in the countries of origin to their contemporary issues. The histories of Asian Pacific American groups as well as culture, politics, the media, and stereotypes, viewed from an interdisciplinary perspective.
AAST201
Asian American History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: HIST221.
Credit only granted for: AAST201 or HIST221.
Introduction to the history of Asian Americans and Asians in the United States and the Americas and to the field of Asian American Studies, from an interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include theories of race and ethnicity; Asian migration and diaspora to the Americas; Asian American work and labor issues; gender, family, and communities; nationalism and nativism, and anti-Asian movements; Asian Americans in World War II, the Cold War, and the issues in the civil rights & post-civil rights era.
AAST233
Introduction to Asian American Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: ENGL233.
Credit only granted for: ENGL233 or AAST233.
A survey of Asian American literature with an emphasis on recurrent themes and historical context.
AAST351
Asian Americans and Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Credit only granted for: AAST351, AAST398M or AAST398N.
Formerly: AAST398M, AAST398N.
From yellow peril invaders to model minority allies, Asian Americans have crafted their own dynamic cultural expressions in a number of media from film, television, and music to fashion, sports, and food that reveal and contest the contradictions of the U.S. nation-state. Asian American culture also uniquely sits at the nexus of immigration flows and digital technologies, providing a transnational lens to view the US place in the world. This advanced course, then, will introduce students to the study and practice of Asian American cyktyre as multiple , hybrid, and heterogeneous. It will do so through three sections: section one will introduce students to classical, cultural, and media concepts as well as relevant keywords outlined by Asian American Studies scholars; section two will review the work of Asian American cultural theorists; section three will focus on analyses of particular Asian American cultural productions. In doing so, students will gain an understanding of the shifting and interlocking tensions among the local, the national, and the global that form the cultural geographies of Asian America.
AAST440
South Asian American Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: AAST440 or AAST498W.
Formerly: AAST498W.
Examines writing by South Asian American authors and authors writing about South Asian American issues. It explores major South Asian diaspora themes, considering how migration, war, the events of 9/11, global capitalism, and the changing socio-political and racial scene have affected South Asians in the United States. We will use a transnational approach to consider how writers and filmmakers explore gender, class, religious, caste, and other differences amongst South Asian Americans. We will also examine the place of South Asian Americans in relation to other Asian American populations. We will consider how South Asian American texts disrupt traditional literary classifications based on national identities by reflecting the complex global conditions, imperialistic and capitalistic expansion, and interconnectedness of peoples, nations, and cultures that have transformed American literature and conceptions of American identity.
AMST
American Studies Department Site
AMST101
Introduction American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: AMST101 or AMST201.
Formerly: AMST201.
Introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of American Studies by examining concepts such as culture, identity, cultural practices, and globalization, as well as theories underlying these concepts. Engages key themes, especially constructions of difference and identity, cultures of everyday life, and America and the world.
AMST203
Popular Culture in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
An introduction to American popular culture, its historical development, and its role as a reflection of and influence on our culture and society.
AMST205
Material Aspects of American Life
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Historical survey of American material culture. Ways of describing and interpreting accumulated material evidence (e.g., buildings, town plans) introduced by stressing relationship between artifact and culture.
AMST213
Heroes and Villains in American Film
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: CINE282.
Credit only granted for: AMST213, HONR219F, CINE282 or FILM298V.
Formerly: HONR219F, FILM298V.
We will examine the complex, changing, and ever-present representations of heroes and villains in American film. Beginning with a foundational understanding of how heroes and, conversely, villains have been defined through classic Hollywood film, we will explore how these definitions have shifted throughout the 20th and 21st century in various narrative genres, including westerns, war films, film noir, fantasy, science fiction, and, of course, superhero movies. In particular, we will be focusing on how the hero and villain maintain or disrupt specific cultural ideologies concerning race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and ability. This course will examine how these various ideologies have evolved throughout the 20th and 21st century, impacting the ways in which heroes and villains are both represented in American film and perceived by diverse audiences. Finally, we will examine our own complicated and sometimes troubling identification with these heroes, even when they might stand in stark contrast to our cultural values and identities.
AMST298C
Introduction to Asian American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AAST200.
Credit only granted for: AAST200 or AMST298C.
The aggregate experience of Asian Pacific Americans, from developments in the countries of origin to their contemporary issues. The histories of Asian Pacific American groups as well as culture, politics, the media, and stereotypes, viewed from an interdisciplinary perspective.
AMST298Q
U.S. Latinx Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: ENGL235.
Credit only granted for: ENGL235 or AMST298Q.
Examines the poetry, prose, and theater of Latinx communities in the United States from their origins in the Spanish colonization of North America to their ongoing development in the 21st century. Considers how authors use literary form to gain insight into human experience, including mortality, religious belief, gender and sexuality, war and peace, family, language use, scientific inquiry, cultural tradition, ecology, and labor. Also studies how Latinx literary traditions have shaped and been shaped by broader currents in American literature, as well as what connections exist between Latinx literature and social and artistic developments in other parts of the world, particularly Latin America and the Caribbean. Authors may include Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, Eulalia Perez, Juan Nepomuceno Seguin, Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Jose Marti, Arthur A. Schomburg, Jesus Colon, Julia de Burgos, Cesar Chavez, Ariel Dorfman, Gloria Anzaldua, Junot Diaz, and Cristina Garcia.
AMST418K
Film and American Landscape
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Explores how representations of various geographic spaces in American film impact our understanding of community, identity, and place. In particular, we will think about how these spaces are culturally produced and changeable rather than static. The same space can hold diverse meanings for various groups of people and how such a space is represented in film is often wrapped up with issues of power, the reinforcement of stereotypes, and the creation of self/other dichotomies. By analyzing a variety of narrative, documentary, major studio, and independent films, we will seek to understand how American films' representations of rural, urban, and suburban spaces both reflect, contradict, and often influence our lived experiences of these spaces; in other words, this course will examine how the "reel" intersects with the "real".
ANTH
Anthropology Department Site
ANTH222
Introduction to Ecological and Evolutionary Anthropology
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, DVUP
Credit only granted for: ANTH220 or ANTH222.
An introduction to the evolution of human physiology and human behavior, the relationship between hominid and non-hominid primates, and the study of relationships between a population of humans and their biophysical environment.
Students must pay a $40.00 lab materials fee.
ANTH240
Introduction to Archaeology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Exploration of the variety of past human societies and cultures through archaeology, from the emergence of anatomically modern humans to the more recent historical past.
ANTH260
Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology and Linguistics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Culture and social relationships in a wide variety of settings from small-scale to complex societies. An overview of how anthropology analyzes human behavior. Particular attention to the relationship between language and culture.
ANTH264
Immigration Policy, Immigrant Lives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: IMMR219C.
Credit only granted for: ANTH264 or IMMR219C.
An examination of the phenomenon of international migration, or immigration. Students develop awareness of how immigration has been framed in the general public and examined by social science disciplines, most prominently anthropology. Examination of case studies of different immigrant groups in distinct geographic contexts will illuminate the varied incorporation experiences of immigrants into U.S. society.
ANTH265
Anthropology of Global Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
An overview of the growing field of global health including health care systems, medical practices, ideas about illness in cross-cultural contexts, issues of health development, global health inequity, and human rights issues. The course will focus on the history of global health, the critique of major international health agencies and their development paradigms, and the political economy of social inequalities and health.
ANTH310
Method & Theory in Medical Anthropology and Global Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Prerequisite: ANTH210.
Jointly offered with ANTH665.
Credit only granted for: ANTH310, ANTH465, or ANTH665.
Formerly: ANTH465.
Provides a critical perspective to global health that encompasses key political, economic, and cultural factors associated with the nature and magnitude of global health issues such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, paying particular attention to how poverty and inequalities within and between societies has accelerated current global health challenges. Introduces students to how medical anthropologists have contributed to the debates surrounding the globalization of health.
Restriction: Must be in Anthropology program; or permission of BSOS Anthropology department.
AREC
Agricultural and Resource Economics Department Site
AREC345
Global Poverty and Economic Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
This interdisciplinary course explores social and economic development around the world. Topics include geography, democratization, political instability and conflict, health and education, agricultural development, micro-entrepreneurship, and an introduction to impact evaluation methods used to evaluate the efficacy of public policy aimed at alleviating poverty.
AREC365
World Hunger, Population, and Food Supplies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
An introduction to the problem of world hunger and possible solutions to it. World demand, supply, and distribution of food. Alternatives for leveling off world food demand, increasing the supply of food, and improving its distribution. Environmental limitations to increasing world food production.
ARTH
Art History & Archaeology Department Site
ARTH200
Art and Society in Ancient and Medieval Europe and the Mediterranean
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Examines the material culture and visual expressions of Mediterranean and European societies from early times until ca. 1300 CE, emphasizing the political, social, and religious context of the works studied, the relationships of the works to the societies that created them, and the interrelationship of these societies.
ARTH261
Monuments, Monumentality, and the Art of Memorial
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Why do societies create monuments? And why do they preserve and destroy, change and remove them? How do monuments embody cultural values, shape historical narratives, and become sites of mourning and memory? This course investigates the political and cultural work of monuments across time and space, from the ancient world to European empires to the contemporary United States. The issues we consider include intercultural exchange and religious contexts, race and representation, and appropriation and iconoclasm.
ARTH292
Discovering Japan: How the Arts Shaped a Nation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Explores the origins and creation of Japan from ancient to contemporary times through East Asian and European exchange. Acquaints students with painting, sculpture, architecture, ceramics, gardens, and other art forms in relation to the various cultural contexts within which they were produced and used.
ARTH361
American Art from Civil War to Civil Rights
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Explores diverse artistic movements and makers in the United States, beginning at the end of the Civil War in 1865 and concluding with the art of Civil Rights era in the 20th century. We will ask how the visual arts construct and challenge formations of race, class, gender, and citizenship in the context of political transformations and social movements over a century of US history. This course emphasizes the practice of close looking as we encounter works art across a range of media--photography, painting, sculpture, film, material culture, performance art and public art.
CCJS
Criminology and Criminal Justice Department Site
CCJS370
(Perm Req)
Race, Crime and Criminal Justice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Prerequisite: CCJS100.
Role and treatment of racial/ethnic minorities in the criminal justice system. Course will provide students with historical and theoretical framework for understanding this dynamic.
CHIN
Chinese Department Site
CHIN425
Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in China
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Recommended: Any CHIN course or course on China.
Credit only granted for: CHIN425 or CHIN429G.
Formerly: CHIN429G.
This course looks into ethnic and cultural diversity in China. It examines the evolution of the People's Republic of China's (PRC) ethnic policies in relation to nation-state building over the last six decades. Specifically, it studies how the PRC has categorized the Chinese people into 56 ethnic groups, how it has made affirmative action policies to accommodate ethnic diversity, and what problems its approaches have experienced and what solutions it has proposed in its accommodation of ethnicity and diversity in the 21st century. To examine the above issues, the course introduces and applies the concepts of ethnicity, nationality, ethnic nationalism, civic nationalism, identity, social Darwinism, the Soviet model of multinational state building, the Chinese model of inclusive Chinese nation state building, citizenship, individual rights, group rights, equality, and diversity.
CHSE
Counseling, Higher Education, and Special Education
CHSE205
Disability: From Stigma and Sideshow to Mainstream and Main Street
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: EDSP289I or CHSE205.
Formerly: EDSP289I.
Explores the cultural, historical, educational, and medical roots of difference among human beings and examines the impact of cultural and technological changes on individuals traditionally identified as disabled. The course is designed to develop a broad understanding of the concept of "disability" and the emerging technologies that shape contemporary understanding of this phenomenon and the lives of those considered disabled.
CINE
Cinema and Media Studies
CINE280
Film Art in a Global Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: CMLT280.
Credit only granted for: CINE280, FILM298D or CMLT280.
Formerly: FILM298D.
Comparative study of a variety of film traditions from around the world, including cinema from Hollywood, Europe, Asia and developing countries, with a stress on different cultural contexts for film-making and viewing.
CINE282
Heroes and Villains in American Film
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AMST213.
Credit only granted for: AMST213, HONR219F, CINE282 or FILM298V.
Formerly: HONR219F, FILM298V.
We will examine the complex, changing, and ever-present representations of heroes and villains in American film. Beginning with a foundational understanding of how heroes and, conversely, villains have been defined through classic Hollywood film, we will explore how these definitions have shifted throughout the 20th and 21st century in various narrative genres, including westerns, war films, film noir, fantasy, science fiction, and, of course, superhero movies. In particular, we will be focusing on how the hero and villain maintain or disrupt specific cultural ideologies concerning race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and ability. This course will examine how these various ideologies have evolved throughout the 20th and 21st century, impacting the ways in which heroes and villains are both represented in American film and perceived by diverse audiences. Finally, we will examine our own complicated and sometimes troubling identification with these heroes, even when they might stand in stark contrast to our cultural values and identities.
CLAS
Classics Department Site
CLAS316
Classical Antiquity and the Cinema
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: CINE316.
Credit only granted for: CLAS316 or CINE316.
Many films, while rooted in the time and place in which they were created, draw upon themes and stories from ancient Greek and Roman literature. While the filmmakers' understandings of modern social forces affect their representations of the ancient world, the ancient works also shape the ways in which filmmakers tell their stories. Film criticism and close reading complement each other in the analysis of films and the ancient works on which they are based.
CLAS320
Women in Classical Antiquity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: HIST328W, WGSS320.
Credit only granted for: CLAS320, WMST320, WGSS320 or HIST328W.
A study of women's image and reality in ancient Greek and Roman societies through an examination of literary, linguistic, historical, legal, and artistic evidence; special emphasis in women's role in the family, views of female sexuality, and the place of women in creative art. Readings in primary sources in translation and modern critical writings.
CLAS322
Roman Freedpersons
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
The literary remains of three Roman freedpersons--the editor and biographer Tiro (c. 80-4 BCE), the poet and fabulist Phaedrus (fl. 1st cen. CE), and the philosopher Epictetus (c. 55-135 CE)--give us a rare glimpse into the internal experience of persons enslaved and emancipated by Roman elites. To contextualize these experiences, we study the legal basis of Roman slavery, epigraphic self-representations, and stereotyping representations of freedpersons by free authors. We also read our authors against comparable works by freeborn analogues--the senator Cicero, the poet Horace, and the philosopher Seneca--to test the boundaries of how the identity of libertus ("freedman") affected and failed to affect our authors' literary aims. To deepen our study of how historical conditions shape the creation of freed authorship and the transmission of freed authors, we also read, and consider the conditions surrounding the publication of, American freedpersons' literature.
CLAS340
Ancient Slavery and its American Impacts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: HIST339J.
Credit only granted for: CLAS340 or HIST339J.
Interrogates how slavery permeated the ancient Mediterranean societies of Greece and Rome. We will pay particular attention to how hierarchical inequalities are institutionalized, experienced, and represented and to how different marginalized and dominant groups interacted. Enslaved persons performed necessary labor in Greece and Rome and their work was essential for the formation of ancient society in agriculture, mining, domestic spaces, literature, finance, and government. Studying ancient slavery offers a chance to examine Greece and Rome from the bottom up, parsing the scant literary and material evidence for the lives and struggles of enslaved persons. We will practice several different approaches in order to tease out the systematic, economic, political, and personal effects of slavery in the ancient world. The United States of America was also founded as a slave society, and discussions of slavery in the Americas often look back to the ancient Mediterranean. The course will therefore conclude with a unit on how enslavers and abolitionists in the United States utilized and responded to slavery in antiquity.
CMLT
Comparative Literature Department Site
CMLT235
Black Diaspora Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Examination of key works by writers of the African Diaspora. Relationship among black people across multiple geographic spaces; Africa, the Caribbean, the United States, Europe, Latin America, and Asia. Specific historical, cultural, and literary contexts; themes such as gender, sexuality, migration, slavery, freedom, and equality. Readings may include literary texts (fiction, poetry, drama), music and film. All readings in English, but drawn from multiple languages of the black diaspora, including English, Spanish, French and Portuguese.
CMLT270
Global Literature and Social Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Comparative study of literature through selected literary works from several non-Western cultures, viewed cross-culturally in light of particular social, political, and economic perspectives.
CMLT275
World Literature by Women
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: WGSS275.
Credit only granted for: WMST275, CMLT275 or WGSS275.
Formerly: WMST275.
Comparative study of selected works by women writers of several countries, exploring points of intersection and divergence in women's literary representations.
CMLT277
Literatures of the Americas
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Comparative study of several North, South, and Central American cultures with a focus on the specificities, similarities, and divergences of their literary and cultural texts.
CMLT280
Film Art in a Global Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: CINE280.
Credit only granted for: CINE280, FILM298D or CMLT280.
Formerly: FILM298D.
Comparative study of a variety of film traditions from around the world, including cinema from Hollywood, Europe, Asia and developing countries, with a stress on different cultural contexts for film-making and viewing.
Cross-listed with FILM298D. Credit only granted for: CMLT280 or FILM298D.
CMSC
Computer Science Department Site
CMSC115
Gender, Race and Computing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have taken CMSC216 or higher.
Cross-listed with: WGSS115.
Credit only granted for: WGSS115 or CMSC115.
Race and gender have shaped computing from its earliest histories to contemporary debates over bias in search algorithms, surveillance, and AI. As computational processes shape ever more dimensions of everyday life from the personal to the global scale, understanding how they operate and how power operates within them grows ever more important. Combating racism and sexism is not as simple as ensuring the pool of programmers and engineers is more diverse; structures of power are embedded in digital technologies as they are in all aspects of our society, and we must learn to perceive their operation if we hope to transform them. We will examine how racism and sexism operate in the field of computer science and in everyday uses of digital technologies, while studying how feminist and racial justice movements have created alternative approaches. This class is for anyone who wishes to better understand the relationships between digital technology, structural power, and social justice.
COMM
Communication Department Site
COMM324
Communication and Gender
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Explores how communication shapes constructions of gender, sex, sexuality and other identity markers. Topics include issues of oppression, identity, and power and social, political, and economic situations and examines how these issues impact our daily lives.
CPET
College Park Scholars-Environment, Technology & Economy
CPET101
College Park Scholars: Environment, Technology & Economy First-Year Colloquium II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Prerequisite: CPET100.
Restriction: Students must be enrolled in the College Park Scholars Environment, Technology & Economy (CPET) program.
Introductory colloquium II: Continued examination of issues related to the convergence of the environment, technology and the economy. Group projects in sustainable development.
EDCP
Education Counseling and Personnel Services Department Site
EDCP489
(Perm Req)
Field Experiences in Counseling and Personnel Services
Credits: 1 - 4
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DVUP
Contact department for information to register for this course.
EDHD
Education, Human Development Department Site
EDHD230
Human Development and Societal Institutions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Development of the individual in the context of relationships with the formal and informal institutions of society. An examination of various aspects of development from the broad perspective of the social sciences.
EDSP
Education, Special Department Site
EDSP210
Introduction to Special Education
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Restriction: Sophomore standing or lower.
Credit only granted for: EDSP210, EDSP211 or EDSP470.
Characteristics and needs of individuals receiving special education and related services. Current issues and practices in special education.
EDSP211
(Perm Req)
Introduction to Special Education
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Restriction: Sophomore standing or lower; and permission of EDUC-Counseling, Higher Education and Special Education department.
Credit only granted for: EDSP210, EDSP211 or EDSP470.
An introduction to the field of special education. Students examine historical foundations, including legislation; review components necessary for effective service delivery; and develop an understanding of the role of collaboration and consultation with parents, school personnel and other professionals. In addition, students are introduced to the nature and characteristics of various disabilities and review current issues in the field including overrepresentation of minority students in special education, inclusion, and federal and state assessment mandates. Current topics are addressed including evidence-based practices, universal design for learning, and individualization and differentiation of instruction..
EDSP311
Peer Mentor Training and Certification
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Provides opportunities and training to facilitate inclusion of students with ID/DD on campus as a peer mentor. Students will develop understanding of disabilities and other conditions that could affect learning and other activities and learn ways to assist and build friendship through a mentor-mentee relationship.
EDSP470
Introduction to Special Education
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Restriction: Must not have completed EDSP210.
Credit only granted for: EDSP210, EDSP211 or EDSP470.
Designed to give an understanding of the needs of all types of exceptional children.
EC/ECSE majors should register for EDSP211.
ENGL
English Department Site
ENGL142
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENGL142 or ENGL289M.
Formerly: ENGL289M.
What does the literature of Maryland teach us about our state's past, present, and future? "Literary Maryland" explores this question by taking students on a tour of our state's prose, poetry, and drama from colonization to the present. In addition to reading fascinating writing and visiting interesting places, you'll learn how the Chesapeake was formed; why nobody sings the entire national anthem; and what led Baltimore to name its football team after a poem written by a Virginian.
ENGL233
Introduction to Asian American Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AAST233.
Credit only granted for: ENGL233 or AAST233.
A survey of Asian American literature with an emphasis on recurrent themes and historical context.
ENGL234
African-American Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AASP298L.
Credit only granted for: ENGL234 or AASP298L.
An exploration of the stories black authors tell about themselves, their communities, and the nation as informed by time and place, gender, sexuality, and class. African American perspective themes such as art, childhood, sexuality, marriage, alienation and mortality, as well as representations of slavery, Reconstruction, racial violence and the Nadir, legalized racism and segregation, black patriotism and black ex-patriots, the optimism of integration, and the prospects of a post-racial America.
Cross-listed with AASP298L. Credit granted for AASP298L or ENGL234.
ENGL235
U.S. Latinx Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AMST298Q.
Credit only granted for: ENGL235 or AMST298Q.
Examines the poetry, prose, and theater of Latinx communities in the United States from their origins in the Spanish colonization of North America to their ongoing development in the 21st century. Considers how authors use literary form to gain insight into human experience, including mortality, religious belief, gender and sexuality, war and peace, family, language use, scientific inquiry, cultural tradition, ecology, and labor. Also studies how Latinx literary traditions have shaped and been shaped by broader currents in American literature, as well as what connections exist between Latinx literature and social and artistic developments in other parts of the world, particularly Latin America and the Caribbean. Authors may include Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, Eulalia Perez, Juan Nepomuceno Seguin, Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Jose Marti, Arthur A. Schomburg, Jesus Colon, Julia de Burgos, Cesar Chavez, Ariel Dorfman, Gloria Anzaldua, Junot Diaz, and Cristina Garcia.
Cross-listed with AMST298Q. Credit granted for ENGL235 or AMST298Q.
ENGL250
Reading Women Writing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: WGSS255.
Credit only granted for: ENGL250, WMST255 or WGSS255.
Formerly: WMST255.
Explores literary and cultural expressions by women and their receptions within a range of historical periods and genres. Topics such as what does a woman need in order to write, what role does gender play in the production, consumption, and interpretation of texts, and to what extent do women comprise a distinct literary subculture. Interpretation of texts will be guided by feminist and gender theory, ways of reading that have emerged as important to literary studies over the last four decades.
ENGL265
LGBTQ+ Literatures and Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have completed LGBT265.
Cross-listed with: LGBT265.
Credit only granted for: ENGL265 or LGBT265.
A study of literary and cultural expressions of queer and trans identities, positionalities, and analytics through an exploration of literature, art, and media. We will examine historical and political power relations by considering the intersections of sexuality and gender with race, class, nation, and disability. Topics include the social construction and regulation of sexuality and gender, performance and performativity, intersectionality, and the relationship between aesthetic forms and queer/ trans subjectivity. Our interpretations will be informed by queer and trans theories.
ENGL292
Writing for Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Prerequisite: Permission of ARHU-English department.
Recommended: ENGL101.
Restriction: Requires application and references.
Jointly offered with: ENGL388C.
Credit only granted for: ENGL292 or ENGL388C.
Service learning in collaboration with students at area high schools. Explores how writing can be a tool for social change. Participants serve as mentors, create a performance event concerning a pressing social issue, and compose reflections, literacy narratives, publicity materials, and a multimodal project. Focus on developing critical self-awareness.
Jointly offered with ENGL388C. Credit granted ENGL292 or ENGL388C.
ENGL388C
(Perm Req)
Writing for Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Prerequisite: Permission of ARHU-English Department .
Recommended: ENGL101.
Restriction: Requires application and references.
Jointly offered with: ENGL292.
Credit only granted for: ENGL292 or ENGL388C.
Service learning in collaboration with students at area high schools. Explores how writing can be a tool for social change. Participants serve as mentors, create a performance event concerning a pressing social issue, and compose reflections, literacy narratives, and publicity materials. Students also design individual projects that link course content and students' own professional interests.
FMSC
Family Science Department Site
FMSC330
Family Health: Health Happens in Families
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Restriction: Junior standing or higher.
The objective of this gateway course is to help you understand and apply basic theories and empirical data on family health. The course is designed to provide you with skills to think critically about theories including: Life Course Theory, the Bio-Ecological and Social-Ecological Models, and Systems Theory. We will ask questions about the distinct qualities and intersections of contexts and characteristics that impact the functioning of families. We will apply theory and research to topical issues in family health that are impacted by social structures such as conflict, crisis, migration, incarceration and inequalities.
FMSC381
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Prerequisite: SOCY100 or SOCY105.
Restriction: Must be in a major within SPHL-Family Science department.
Social, political, cultural and economic factors influencing income and wealth in American families.
FMSC460
Violence in Families
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Prerequisite: SOCY100, SOCY105, or PSYC100.
Credit only granted for: FMSC460 or FMST460.
Formerly: FMST460.
Theories of child, spouse, and elder abuse in the family setting. Emphasis on historical, psychological, sociological and legal trends relating to physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. Introduction to methods for prevention and remediation.
GVPT
Government and Politics Department Site
GVPT200
International Political Relations
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
A study of the major factors underlying international relations, the causes of conflict and cooperation among international actors, the role of international institutions, the interactions of domestic and foreign policies, and major issues in security, economy and the environment.
GVPT282
The Politics of Global Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
A study of the domestic governmental institutions; processes and problems such as conflict and economic development; and the socio-economic environments that are common to lower-income countries around the world.
This is a GVPT Global Learning offering. For more information click here.
HISP
Historic Preservation
HISP200
The Everyday and the American Environment
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Jointly offered with HISP615.
An introduction to the theories of the everyday within the context of the American built environment. Focuses primarily on the American experience of underrepresented, minority, and/or immigrant communities; both historical and contemporary. Attempts to challenge what is meant by American in describing the American everyday built environment.
HIST
History Department Site
HIST111
The Medieval World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
The development of Europe in the Middle Ages; the role of religious values in shaping new social, economic, and political institutions; medieval literature, art and architecture.
HIST201
Interpreting American History: From 1865 to the Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: HIST157 or HIST201.
Formerly: HIST157.
The United States from the end of the Civil War to the present. Economic, social, intellectual, and political developments. Rise of industry and emergence of the United States as a world power.
HIST211
Women in America Since 1880
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: WGSS211.
Credit only granted for: HIST211, WMST211 or WGSS211.
Formerly: WMST211.
An examination of women's changing roles in working class and middle class families, the effects of industrialization on women's economic activities and status, and women's involvement in political and social struggles, including those for women's rights, birth control, and civil rights.
HIST221
Asian American History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AAST201.
Credit only granted for: AAST201 or HIST221.
Introduction to the history of Asian Americans and Asians in the United States and the Americas and to the field of Asian American Studies, from an interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include theories of race and ethnicity; Asian migration and diaspora to the Americas; Asian American work and labor issues; gender, family, and communities; nationalism and nativism, and anti-Asian movements; Asian Americans in World War II, the Cold War, and the issues in the civil rights & post-civil rights era.
HIST222
Immigration and Ethnicity in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: AAST222, HIST222, or SOCY222.
The history of immigration and the development of diverse populations i the United States are examined. Topics include related political controversies, the social experiences of immigrants, ethnicity, generations, migration, inter-group relations, race, and diversity in American culture.
HIST233
Empire! The British Imperial Experience 1558-1997
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: HIST219P or HIST233.
Formerly: HIST219P.
Britain's empire from the mid-sixteenth century to the late twentieth century, focusing on the encounter between Britain and indigenous peoples. Topics include the origins of British imperialism in Ireland and North America, the slave trade, the East India Company and India, women in empire, transportation and the making of Australia, sex in empire, missionaries, racial theories, and decolonization.
HIST251
Latin America Since Independence
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: LACS251.
Credit only granted for: HIST251, LASC251, or LACS251.
Formerly: HIST251 or LASC251.
Introductory survey of the history of Latin America from the era of independence (c. 1810-1825) through the early 1980s. Major themes include independence and sovereignty, postcolonialism and neocolonialism, nation- and state-building, liberalism, citizenship, economic development and modernization, social organization and stratification, race and ethnicity, gender relations, identity politics, reform and revolution, authoritarianism and democratization, and inter-American relations.
Cross-listed with LASC251. Credit granted for HIST251 or LASC251.
HIST287
Why the Jews? Historical and Cultural Investigations
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have completed HIST282, HIST283, JWST234, or JWST235.
Cross-listed with JWST233.
Credit only granted for: HIST287 or JWST233.
Examines the history and culture of the Jews from the thirteenth century BCE/BC to the present through an examination of significant themes or problems (such as "religion" or "diaspora") that shape our understanding of the Jewish people. A primary focus in the course will be on texts, artifacts, and other cultural products by Jews and others that illustrate the history of the Jews help understand their cultural heritage.
HIST289A
Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Medieval Spain: Tolerance, Oppression, and the Problematic Past
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: RELS289C.
Credit only granted for: HIST289A or RELS289C.
For 800 years, medieval Spain was home to one of the most religiously diverse societies in European history. Despite frequent hostilities, the interactions of Spanish Jews, Christians, and Muslims produced a flowering of science, theology, and literature in an often remarkably tolerant climate. Students will learn how medieval Spanish people themselves experienced interreligious contact and conflict. They will also discover the modern pressures, prejudices, and ideals that have shaped historians interpretations of medieval Spain.
HIST289N
The Politics of Sexuality in America: A Historical Approach
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: WGSS298N.
Credit only granted for: HIST289N or WGSS298N.
Why do particular issues about sexuality hold such an important place in American political debates? What animates these controversies and what can a historical perspective on these issues add to our understanding of modern sexual politics? This class explores the historical sexual politics that undergird contemporary debates concerning sexuality in America. It focuses on topics that garner significant public attention - Reproductive rights - LGBTQ rights - Sexting - and explores the histories that undergird Americans disagreements.
HIST291
Jewish Texts and Cultures of the Second Temple Period
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: JWST231.
Credit only granted for: HIST291 or JWST231.
An introduction to the literature, history, and culture of Jews in the period between the sixth century BCE and the second century CE. Special topics may include the rise of the formation of the biblical canon, scriptural interpretation, sectarian and revolutionary movements, and growth of the diaspora.
HIST328W
Women in Classical Antiquity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: CLAS320, WGSS320.
Credit only granted for: CLAS320, WMST320, WGSS320 or HIST328W.
A study of women's image and reality in ancient Greek and Roman societies through an examination of literary, linguistic, historical, legal, and artistic evidence; special emphasis in women's role in the family, views of female sexuality, and the place of women in creative art. Readings in primary sources in translation and modern critical writings.
HIST339J
Ancient Slavery and its American Impacts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: CLAS340.
Credit only granted for: CLAS340 or HIST339J.
Interrogates how slavery permeated the ancient Mediterranean societies of Greece and Rome. We will pay particular attention to how hierarchical inequalities are institutionalized, experienced, and represented and to how different marginalized and dominant groups interacted. Enslaved persons performed necessary labor in Greece and Rome and their work was essential for the formation of ancient society in agriculture, mining, domestic spaces, literature, finance, and government. Studying ancient slavery offers a chance to examine Greece and Rome from the bottom up, parsing the scant literary and material evidence for the lives and struggles of enslaved persons. We will practice several different approaches in order to tease out the systematic, economic, political, and personal effects of slavery in the ancient world. The United States of America was also founded as a slave society, and discussions of slavery in the Americas often look back to the ancient Mediterranean. The course will therefore conclude with a unit on how enslavers and abolitionists in the United States utilized and responded to slavery in antiquity.
HNUH
University Honors
HNUH238U
Unequal Opportunity? Race and the Future of American Education
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
America's schools are dynamic microcosms of society at large. They simultaneously reflect, reproduce, and shape what happens outside of the classroom, including the many ways that racism affects us all. The educational mechanisms that operate for the benefit of some and to the detriment of others are often hard to see, often because they are hidden in plain sight. For example, national tests are standardized. When racialized differences in test scores appear, they are called "achievement gaps" and the disparity is attributed to essential differences or cultural deficiency rather than inequitable access and opportunity. In this course students will learn methods to critically examine such commonplace notions as the achievement gap and to document their effects on society. They will also develop strategies for self-reflection that enable them to confront inequity in their own educational experience and work to create change.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

This course is part of the Systemic Racism thematic cluster. Students who enroll in HNUH238U are required to complete HNUH238B to complete the cluster. Systemic Racism courses will be offered through spring 2024.
HNUH248U
The Loneliness Crisis: Origins and Solutions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
In 2017, U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy deemed loneliness an "epidemic." Despite the rise of social media that is meant to foster connection, over 23% of adults report being lonely and social networks have been shrinking for decades. Like a viral epidemic, widespread loneliness has grave consequences. Loneliness shortens lifespans at a rate akin to smoking 15 cigarettes a day and predicts mortality risk better than poor diet or lack of exercise. This course will explore how loneliness became a crisis--exploring potential drivers of loneliness like social media, systemic racism, homophobia, and the rise of romantic love--and what we can do about it. It will end with students developing interventions to diminish loneliness and practicing skills to connect with one another.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH248U is part of the Global Crises, Sustainable Futures thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH248B to complete the cluster. Global Crises, Sustainable Futures courses will be offered through Spring 2024.
JOUR
Journalism Department Site
JOUR175
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Additional information: Not applicable toward journalism major.
An analysis of the information, values and underlying messages conveyed via television, newspapers, the internet, magazines, radio and film. Examines the accuracy of those messages and explores how media shape views of politics, culture and society.
Synchronous online meetings 1/24 from 6:30-8pm EST, 2/28 from 6:30-8pm EST, 4/3 from 6:30-8pm EST and 5/1 from 6:30-8pm EST.
JOUR452
Women in the Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Cross-listed with: WGSS452.
Credit only granted for: JOUR452, WMST452 or WGSS452.
Formerly: WMST 452.
Participation and portrayal of women in the mass media from colonial to contemporary times.
JOUR453
Media Coverage of Diversity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Restriction: Junior standing or higher.
Analysis of media coverage of issues relating to diversity in the United States, with special attention to race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation and religious affiliation.
Cross-listed with AASP499N. Credit only granted for JOUR453 or AASP499N.
JWST
Jewish Studies Department Site
JWST231
Jewish Texts and Cultures of the Second Temple Period
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: HIST291.
Credit only granted for: HIST291 or JWST231.
An introduction to the literature, history, and culture of Jews in the period between the sixth century BCE and the second century CE. Special topics may include the rise of the formation of the biblical canon, scriptural interpretation, sectarian and revolutionary movements, and growth of the diaspora.
JWST233
Why the Jews? Historical and Cultural Investigations
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have completed HIST282, HIST283, JWST234, or JWST235.
Cross-listed with HIST287.
Credit only granted for: JWST233 or HIST287.
Examines the history and culture of the Jews from the thirteenth century BCE/BC to the present through an examination of significant themes or problems (such as "religion" or "diaspora") that shape our understanding of the Jewish people. A primary focus in the course will be on texts, artifacts, and other cultural products by Jews and others that illustrate the history of the Jews help understand their cultural heritage.
KNES
Kinesiology Department Site
KNES285
History of Physical Culture, Sport, & Science in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Restricted to majors or non-majors with less than or equal to 60 credits.
Credit only granted for: KNES285 or KNES293.
Examines the history of physical culture in America, focusing on the period from the end of the Civil War to the Cold War. Physical culture refers to a broad range of movement practices including sport, play, rehabilitative exercise, health and fitness training, and recreation and leisure. More specifically, we challenge the idea that historical physical culture practices--and the scientific processes from which they were derived--were 'neutral' or 'objective'; rather, we explore the cultural, social, political, and economic contexts shaping physical culture knowledge, study, structures, and policies across American history. The goal is for you to learn and apply techniques of historical analysis to develop a critical understanding of how knowledge about, and practices of, physical culture supported a particular social order via the construction of difference, norms, and/or hierarchies, and ultimately contributed to some of the inequalities that endure today.
KNES287
Sport and American Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Recommended: Minimum grade of C- in KNES285.
Sport will be related to such social problems as delinquency, segregation, collective behavior, and leisure; to social processes such as socialization, stratification, mobility, and social control; and to those familiar social institutions the family, the school, the church, the military, the economy, the polity, and the mass media.
Restricted to majors or non-majors with less than or equal to 45 credits.
KNES334
Adapted Physical Activity: Empowering People with Disabilities to Lead a Healthy and Active Lifestyle
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Prerequisite: KNES370; or students not in the Kinesiology major may contact the instructor for permission.
Restriction: Must have earned a minimum of 90 credits.
Credit only granted for: KNES498L or KNES334.
Formerly: KNES498L.
Study of the field of adapted physical activity and its impact on the health and wellness of individuals with disabilities. Students will design an adapted physical activity program proposal and develop the skills needed to empower people with disabilities to participate in physical activity and sports programs. Students will explore their own perceptions towards disability and how people with disabilities are portrayed in our society. They will study the etiology of disabling conditions and the implications for participating in physical activity.
Restricted to KNES majors only.
KNES485
Sport and Globalization
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in KNES287.
Restriction: Must be in a major within the SPHL-Kinesiology department; and must have earned a minimum of 75 credits.
Examination of sport culture from a global perspective; focuses on theorizing the similarities and differences between various national sporting cultures.
LACS
Latin American and Caribbean Studies
LACS235
Issues in Latin American and Caribbean Studies II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: PORT235, SPAN235.
Credit only granted for: LASC235, PORT235, SPAN235, or LACS235.
Formerly: LASC235.
Major issues shaping Latin American and Caribbean societies including the changing constructions of race, ethnicity, gender and class as well as expressions of popular cultures and revolutionary practices. Taught in English.
LACS251
Latin America Since Independence
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: HIST251.
Credit only granted for: HIST251, LASC251, or LACS251.
Formerly: HIST251 or LASC251.
Introductory survey of the history of Latin America from the era of independence (c. 1810-1825) through the early 1980s. Major themes include independence and sovereignty, postcolonialism and neocolonialism, nation- and state-building, liberalism, citizenship, economic development and modernization, social organization and stratification, race and ethnicity, gender relations, identity politics, reform and revolution, authoritarianism and democratization, and inter-American relations.
LGBT
Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Studies
LGBT200
Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: LGBT200.
An interdisciplinary study of the historical and social contexts of personal, cultural and political aspects of LGBT life. Sources from a variety of fields, such as anthropology, history, psychology, sociology, and women's studies, focusing on writings by and about LGBT people.
LGBT265
LGBTQ+ Literatures and Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have completed LGBT265.
Cross-listed with: ENGL265.
Credit only granted for: ENGL265 or LGBT265.
A study of literary and cultural expressions of queer and trans identities, positionalities, and analytics through an exploration of literature, art, and media. We will examine historical and political power relations by considering the intersections of sexuality and gender with race, class, nation, and disability. Topics include the social construction and regulation of sexuality and gender, performance and performativity, intersectionality, and the relationship between aesthetic forms and queer/ trans subjectivity. Our interpretations will be informed by queer and trans theories.
LGBT448Y
Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies; Dickinson, Erotics, Poetics, Biopics: Some (Queer) Ways We Read Poetry
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Prerequisite: Two English courses in literature; or permission of ARHU-English department. Cross-listed with ENGL439D and WGSS498Y. Credit only granted for ENGL439D, LGBT448Y, WGSS498Y, or WMST498Y.
MUSC
School of Music Department Site
MUSC204
Popular Music in Black America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Traces black popular music in the U.S. with a special focus on spirituals, ragtime, the blues, early jazz, R&B, Motown, funk, soul, and rap. Examines how these styles have been borrowed by the American music industry.
MUSC205
History of Popular Music, 1950-Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
A historical survey of rock music (blues, rock, soul, metal, rap, etc.) from circa 1950 to the present, with emphasis on popular music as music and popular music as social history.
MUSC210
The Impact of Music on Life
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: MUET210 or MUSC210.
Formerly: MUET210.
Music as a part of culture. Materials drawn from traditions throughout the globe to illustrate issues of historical and contemporary significance, including the impact of race, class and gender on the study of music.
MUSC215
World Popular Musics and Identity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: MUET200 or MUSC215.
Formerly: MUET200.
Focus on popular musics in different cultures with an emphasis on cross-cultural comparisons and analysis of how musics and identity intersect.
MUSC220
Selected Musical Cultures of the World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Must not be in any of the following programs: (Music (Professional Program); Music Education).
A critical and comparative exploration of musical practices from around the world in their social, political and economic contexts.
Also offered as ANTH298B. For Spring 2020; credit only granted for MUET220, MUSC220, or ANTH298B.
PHSC
Public Health Science
PHSC450
Addressing Social and Structural Inequities Through Public Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MIEH300; and 1 course with a minimum grade of C- from either SPHL100 or PHSC300.
A focus on addressing social and structural inequities within race, gender, disability, and class through various perspectives in the field of public health. Students explore the causes, challenges, consequences, and extent these injustices have on health disparities from local, national, and global perspectives. Students view these inequities through the lens of the affected populations, and work interactively and collaboratively to interpret, design, and evaluate public health interventions and approaches to address key health disparities within specific communities. The aim of this course is to help students define appropriate research and address structural inequities with innovative approaches through the professional practice of public health.
RELS
Religious Studies
RELS289C
Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Medieval Spain: Tolerance, Oppression, and the Problematic Past
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HIST289A.
Credit only granted for: HIST289A or RELS289C.
For 800 years, medieval Spain was home to one of the most religiously diverse societies in European history. Despite frequent hostilities, the interactions of Spanish Jews, Christians, and Muslims produced a flowering of science, theology, and literature in an often remarkably tolerant climate. Students will learn how medieval Spanish people themselves experienced interreligious contact and conflict. They will also discover the modern pressures, prejudices, and ideals that have shaped historians interpretations of medieval Spain.
SLLC
School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures Department Site
SLLC305
Language, Identity and Diversity in the U.S.
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Introduces issues of linguistic diversity in the framework of the U.S. as a multilingual society. Special emphasis is placed on attitudes toward language diversity, specifically, how regional, social, generational, ethnic, racial and gender differences in language use contribute to notions of identity.
SOCY
Sociology Department Site
SOCY241
Inequality in American Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: SOCY241 or SOCY441.
A broad-based overview of inequality in contemporary U.S. society, focusing on measuring patterns and trends over time. A series of learning modules familiarizes students with how inequality unfolds in relation to social stratification processes along the lines of race, gender, education and social class, income and wealth, and health.
Credit granted for SOCY241 or SOCY441.
SOCY245
The Family in Contemporary American Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Credit only granted for: SOCY243 or SOCY245.
This is a course in the sociology of the family as an institutional arena in the United States. Students will become familiar with the empirical patterns and trends, political and cultural debates, and policy issues concerning families - and the major theories and research methods used in the sociological study of the family. The readings include a textbook and a research monograph. To succeed, students will attend lectures and participate in discussion; complete quizzes and in-class writing assignments; and take a midterm and final exam.
SPAN
Spanish Department Site
SPAN235
Issues in Latin American and Caribbean Studies II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: LACS235, PORT235.
Credit only granted for: LASC235, PORT235, SPAN235, or LACS235.
Formerly: LASC235.
Major issues shaping Latin American and Caribbean societies including the changing constructions of race, ethnicity, gender and class as well as expressions of popular cultures and revolutionary practices. Taught in English.
SPAN362
Latin American Literatures and Cultures II: From Independence to Nation Formation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Prerequisite: SPAN303; and (SPAN311 or SPAN316).
An overview of cultural and literary production of Latin America from the 18th Century to approximately 1900, exploring the production of literary texts in their socio-historical, political, and cultural contexts and development. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN363
Latin American Literatures and Cultures III: From Modernism to Neo-Liberalism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Prerequisite: SPAN303; and (SPAN311 or SPAN316).
An overview of cultural and literary production of Latin America from the late 19th through the early 21st centuries, exploring the production of literary texts in their socio-historical, political, and cultural contexts and development. Taught in Spanish.
THET
Theatre Department Site
THET251
Broadway Mashup: Remixing America Through Musical Theater
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Interrogate musical theater's political history, investigating how this uniquely American genre uses narrative, song, and dance to weave critical differences across race, ethnicity, immigration status, religion, gender, sexuality, and ability into our national fabric.
THET294
Black Theatre and Performance II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Sophomore standing or higher.
Thematic and historical survey of African-American drama from the 1960s to the present. Emphasis on sociopolitical context, thematic thrust, issues, styles, the aesthetic reflected in the work, impact on African-American and general theatre audiences.
TLPL
Teaching and Learning, Policy and Leadership Department Site
TLPL453
Life in Two Languages: Understanding Bilingual Communities and Individuals
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Overview of society and individual multilingualism. Topics include diglossia, language shift, codeswitching, bilingual first language acquisition, language attrition, dual language education policy and practice.
URSP
Urban Studies and Planning
URSP372
Diversity and the City
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Exploration of the different needs of diverse economic, racial/ethnic, and gender groups that live and work in cities, the historical background of differences, the impact of societal structures and group cultures, and how public and private policies do and can affect different groups.
WGSS
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
WGSS115
Gender, Race and Computing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have taken CMSC216 or higher.
Cross-listed with: CMSC115.
Credit only granted for: WGSS115 or CMSC115.
Race and gender have shaped computing from its earliest histories to contemporary debates over bias in search algorithms, surveillance, and AI. As computational processes shape ever more dimensions of everyday life from the personal to the global scale, understanding how they operate and how power operates within them grows ever more important. Combating racism and sexism is not as simple as ensuring the pool of programmers and engineers is more diverse; structures of power are embedded in digital technologies as they are in all aspects of our society, and we must learn to perceive their operation if we hope to transform them. We will examine how racism and sexism operate in the field of computer science and in everyday uses of digital technologies, while studying how feminist and racial justice movements have created alternative approaches. This class is for anyone who wishes to better understand the relationships between digital technology, structural power, and social justice.
WGSS200
Introduction to WGSS: Gender, Power, and Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: WMST200 or WGSS200.
Formerly: WMST200.
Examines constructions of race, class, sexuality, ability, and gender relations from a social science multi-disciplinary perspective. The course interrogates the ways that systems of hierarchy and privilege are created, enforced, and intersect through the language of race, class, sexuality, and national belonging. The course will provide students with the skills to examine how systems of power manifest in areas such as poverty, division of labor, health disparities, policing, violence. In addition to examining the impact of systems of power, students will reflect on their own location within the exercise of racialized, and gendered power relations. This course encourages students to understand and critique these systems both personally and politically.
WGSS211
Women in America Since 1880
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Cross-listed with: HIST211.
Credit only granted for: HIST211, WMST211 or WGSS211.
Formerly: WMST211.
An examination of women's changing roles in working class and middle class families, the effects of industrialization on women's economic activities and status, and women's involvement in political and social struggles, including those for women's rights, birth control, and civil rights.
WGSS250
Introduction to WGSS: Art and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: WMST250 or WGSS250.
Formerly: WMST250.
Provides students with a critical introduction to the ways that art and art activism have served as a conduit to understanding and challenging systems of inequity and practices of normativity. Interrogating the categories of gender, sexuality, race, class, ability, the course will provide students with an examination of how artists have responded to pressing social justice issues of their eras. While the course centers visual art, students will also engage genres such as music, plays, literature, digital and performance art as arenas of social change.
WGSS255
Reading Women Writing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: ENGL250.
Credit only granted for: ENGL250, WMST255 or WGSS255.
Formerly: WMST255.
Explores literary and cultural expressions by women and their receptions within a range of historical periods and genres. Topics such as what does a woman need in order to write, what role does gender play in the production, consumption, and interpretation of texts, and to what extent do women comprise a distinct literary subculture. Interpretation of texts will be guided by feminist and gender theory, ways of reading that have emerged as important to literary studies over the last four decades.
WGSS275
World Literature by Women
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: CMLT275.
Credit only granted for: WMST275, CMLT275 or WGSS275.
Formerly: WMST275.
Comparative study of selected works by women writers of several countries, exploring points of intersection and divergence in women's literary representations.
WGSS280
Gender and Science in Film and Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Isaac Azimov once said of science fiction that it is the genre that "deals with the reaction of human beings to changes in science and technology." With this definition in mind, we will embark on a critical exploration of sci-fi film and other media, using it as a lens for analyzing society's deepest fears and most furtive hopes. Our investigation will center on the liminal space between hegemonic culture and its prescribed excesses. These liminal spaces--between self and other, disability and enhancement, cultural hybridization, and gender crossing--shift in response to real-world sociopolitical tensions. We will consider feminist and anti-racist media scholars' concerns over representation, authorship and ideology alongside questions of technological change. Students will use analytical and creative assignments to explore not only how the scientific imaginary serves as fertile ground for feminist, disability, and anti-racist critique, but also provides a locus for alternative futures.
WGSS290
Bodies in Contention
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: WMST298D or WGSS290.
Formerly: WMST298D.
Explores the contributions of feminist scholarship in framing and resolving contemporary controversies concerning gendered bodies. It includes the ways in which knowledge about the human body has been shaped by cultural ideas of gender, race, sexuality and ability.
WGSS298N
The Politics of Sexuality in America: A Historical Approach
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HIST289N.
Credit only granted for: HIST289N or WGSS298N.
Why do particular issues about sexuality hold such an important place in American political debates? What animates these controversies and what can a historical perspective on these issues add to our understanding of modern sexual politics? This class explores the historical sexual politics that undergird contemporary debates concerning sexuality in America. It focuses on topics that garner significant public attention - Reproductive rights - LGBTQ rights - Sexting - and explores the histories that undergird Americans disagreements.
WGSS320
Women in Classical Antiquity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: CLAS320, HIST328W.
Credit only granted for: CLAS320, WMST320, WGSS320 or HIST328W.
A study of women's image and reality in ancient Greek and Roman societies through an examination of literary, linguistic, historical, legal, and artistic evidence; special emphasis in women's role in the family, views of female sexuality, and the place of women in creative art. Readings in primary sources in translation and modern critical writings.
WGSS452
Women in the Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Cross-listed with: JOUR452.
Credit only granted for: JOUR452, WMST452 or WGSS452.
Formerly: WMST 452.
Participation and portrayal of women in the mass media from colonial to contemporary times.