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Courses - Spring 2024
AASP
African American Studies Department Site
Open Seats as of
02/28/2024 at 10:30 PM
AASP187
The New Jim Crow: African-Americans, Mass Incarceration and the Prison Industrial Complex
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Recommended: AASP100.
Students will examine the birth of the racial caste system following the abolition of slavery, the parallels between the racial hierarchy of the Jim Crow system and contemporary mass incarceration, and the rise of the prison industrial complex as a multi-billon business which thrives on the oppression of low-income populations and poor communities of color.
AASP211
Get Out: The Sunken Place of Race Relations in the Post-Racial Era
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: AASP298G or AASP211.
Formerly: AASP298G.
Prevailing thought suggests that we live in an era that is post-racial, particularly after the election of Barack Obama. Media often serves to drive our assessment of where our nation stands on issues like race, gender and sexuality. This course uses the film Get Out to delve into the production, evolution and significance of race in present day America. The course will engage multiple forms of media to investigate life in "Post-Racial" America, including but not limited to the role of stereotypes, interracial relationships, police-community relations, etc.
AMST
American Studies Department Site
AMST260
American Culture in the Information Age
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: AMST260 or AMST298I.
Formerly: AMST298I.
Examines the ways in which content and form of public information interact with the culture, families & individuals.
ANSC
Animal Science
ANSC227
Eating with Eyes Wide Open
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Students will investigate the tension that is created by trade-offs that, knowingly or not, are made by consumers relative to agricultural production methods and dietary choices. Course will inform students about their food supply so they can make informed decisions and practice intentional or informed eating.
ANTH
Anthropology Department Site
ANTH242
Fire, Farming and Climate Change: An Archaeology Take on the History of Human Impacts on our Planet
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
An examination of why climate changes, the methods for recording climate change, and case studies of the varied responses of past human societies to climate change in different geographic regions and time periods with varying socio-political and economic systems.
ANTH264
Immigration Policy, Immigrant Lives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: IMMR219C.
Credit only granted for: ANTH264 or IMMR219C.
An examination of the phenomenon of international migration, or immigration. Students develop awareness of how immigration has been framed in the general public and examined by social science disciplines, most prominently anthropology. Examination of case studies of different immigrant groups in distinct geographic contexts will illuminate the varied incorporation experiences of immigrants into U.S. society.
ANTH265
Anthropology of Global Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
An overview of the growing field of global health including health care systems, medical practices, ideas about illness in cross-cultural contexts, issues of health development, global health inequity, and human rights issues. The course will focus on the history of global health, the critique of major international health agencies and their development paradigms, and the political economy of social inequalities and health.
ANTH323
Plagues, Pathogens and Public Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ANTH429A or ANTH323.
Formerly: ANTH429A.
The impact of diseases on populations from prehistoric times through the present will be examined, along with public perceptions of disease, scientific breakthroughs on treatment and prevention, and the ways that politics and public health policies can enhance or impede the advancement of disease treatment. The natural history of disease, population structure, and immunity will be discussed. The class will address emerging and re-emerging diseases and the ways that first responders, researchers, and policy makers may affect the outcome of an outbreak.
AOSC
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science
AOSC123
Causes and Consequences of Global Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Cross-listed with: GEOL123.
Credit only granted for: AOSC123, GEOG123, or GEOL123.
Study of the major components of Earth's climate system and climate change history. Discussion of 21st century climate change prediction, mitigation and adaptation efforts.
AOSC200
Weather and Climate
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with AOSC201) or DSNS, SCIS
Prerequisite: MATH107, MATH110, or MATH115.
Recommended: Concurrent enrollment in AOSC201.
What are weather and climate? Most people think they know but if you ask people to explain the differences and similarities you're bound to get a range of answers. Weather affects not just our daily activities but other important aspects of society such as transportation, commerce, security and agriculture. Most people understand what weather is to some extent. Climate and climate change are concepts that evoke strong emotional responses from people but are less well understood. In this class, students examine fundamental issues such as the greenhouse effect, severe weather, and global weather patterns and how they relate to a changing climate. Instruction in the lectures will provide the basic knowledge needed to understand these issues. In the discussion sections, students will be divided into groups to address the implications of these topics through group projects.

A Marquee Science and Technology Course designed for Non-Science Majors: http://www.marqueecourses.umd.edu/* Click here for more Marquee course information.
ARCH
Architecture Department Site
ARCH272
Sustainability at College Park
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS or DSSP, SCIS
Explore the ways and the degrees to which University of Maryland, College Park campus master planning and operations incorporate principles of sustainability including smart growth, LEED and other building rating systems, higher education rating systems, sustainable agriculture and transportation planning. Among other subjects, students will learn about the Campus and the City of College Park and survey the relationship between local, national and global sustainability concerns. Students will learn about the University's Climate Action Plan and the roles, and extent to which, the UMD Office of Sustainability and other campus units are helping develop a carbon-neutral and resource-efficient campus infrastructure.
AREC
Agricultural and Resource Economics Department Site
AREC210
The Food Chain: What Happens As Your Food Goes From Farm to Table
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Food supply chains link farms, input providers, traders, food processors, and retailers. We assess how supply chains are organized, how they use technologies, and how they are adapting their organization and technologies to meet the challenges facing the food system and society. The challenges include: 1) Producing enough food to meet a growing global population, while reducing damages to air, water, and soil resources; (2) Meeting the health challenges posed by obesity and food insecurity, while also meeting consumer preferences for how food should be produced; and (3) Doing all this in the face of climate change.
ARHU
Arts and Humanities Department Site
ARHU380
Arts & Humanities in Social Innovation, Change, and Justice: Do Good Now
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: JWST319P.
Credit only granted for: ARHU380, BSOS388B, JWST319P, or PLCY388D.
The course serves as the core course for the Arts-and-Humanities track in PLCY's minor in "Nonprofit Leadership and Social Innovation." Students will be introduced to the role that the Arts and Humanities can play in social innovation and social change, while exploring various mechanisms for achieving impact with a focus on advancing social justice, equity and systems change. This course deepens understandings of nonprofit leadership, entrepreneurship and social innovation by guiding students through the creation and implementation of social change projects and ventures of their choice.
Cross-listed with JWST319P. For Spring 2023: Credit granted only for JWST319P, ARHU380, BSOS388B, or PLCY388D.
ARTH
Art History & Archaeology Department Site
ARTH260
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Can art effect social change? How may we use the history of radical and avant-garde art to inform present-day movements and models of artistic and creative activism? This course explores the modern and contemporary history of political art and arts activism on local, national, and global scales.
ARTH261
Monuments, Monumentality, and the Art of Memorial
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Why do societies create monuments? And why do they preserve and destroy, change and remove them? How do monuments embody cultural values, shape historical narratives, and become sites of mourning and memory? This course investigates the political and cultural work of monuments across time and space, from the ancient world to European empires to the contemporary United States. The issues we consider include intercultural exchange and religious contexts, race and representation, and appropriation and iconoclasm.
ARTT
Art Studio Department Site
ARTT260
Dangerous Art: Censorship or Subsidy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Combines a broad historical analysis of the relationship between art and authority with an examination of contemporary culture criticism and art practice. Explores the uses and abuses of art and culture in totalitarianand theocratic states as a prelude to a review of the role of official culture in the United States. Examines art and culture in the public arena and many related areas where the arts and policy interact.
ASTR
Astronomy Department Site
ASTR220
Collisions in Space - The Threat of Asteroid Impacts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in the Astronomy major.
Should we defend our planet against potential asteroid impacts? Collisions in Space will evaluate the threat of asteroid impacts with the Earth using knowledge of asteroid characteristics and orbits. The merits of possible defense plans will be discussed, as well as the budgetary and political concerns associated with implementing any such plan. Appropriate for non-science majors.
BMGT
Business and Management Department Site
BMGT289A
Social Enterprise: Changing the World through Innovation and Transformative Action
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
In this course, students will hear from real-life social entrepreneurs, explore current day social issues of sustainability, climate change, leadership, disruptive innovations, and create or blueprint business plans to generate positive social change. This class will focus on innovative thinking skills, personal narratives, and social interaction strategies and plans.
BMGT289B
How Do Innovators Think?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
In this course, students will learn about: a) the innovation process and the role of the individual in generating innovations and b) the attributes, habits, and skills of individuals who have successfully started innovative new businesses or significantly added value to an existing company.
This class will have an additional 5 meetings on Monday evenings from 5-7pm.
BMGT289D
Frauds, Scams, and Thefts: What, How and Why?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
The primary objective of this course is for students to gain a conceptual understanding of how fraud occurs, how it can be prevented, and how fraud can be detected through practical application of skills and tools. This course provides general background relating to fraud (e.g. history, prevalence, psychology), and it delves into the myriad types of fraud, scams and theft. This course also examines the trends in fraud detection and investigation; and introduces and explores with students the constant tension between public order and civil liberties in white collar crime, forensics, and hacking.
BMGT289E
Entrepreneurial Thinking for Non-Business Majors: How Not to Miss Great Opportunities Your Life Throws at You
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
In this course, students learn how to analyze the world around them and then notice and define new trends, emerging problems, impending gaps, and how to turn these into exciting opportunities by providing creative solutions. Students will have a chance to not only sharpen their critical thinking skills, but also learn how to take initiative, develop a working solution, identify and resolve conflicts, and be confident and persistent, yet flexible enough to respond to changes. Student teams identify a compelling problem in present day life and then propose a creative solution taking into account possible difficulties in implementation. In addition, students will also be given problems on a much smaller scale and asked to create and present a workable solution. Students will be exposed to how a visionary's mind works and the creative solution process. In addition, students will also learn how entrepreneurial thinking can improve their day-to-day life.
BMGT289I
Why Good Managers Make Bad Decisions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
This course provides an overview of the concepts, approaches, and vocabulary of evidence-based management (EBM) and provides an understanding of how experts in many disciplines can employ evidenced based decision making. EBM is an emerging movement in business to explicitly use the current best information in management decision making with special emphasis on relevant scientific findings and unbiased organizational facts. The course stresses how individuals practicing EBM learn how to rethink their approaches to data and knowledge in order to make more effective decisions.
BSCI
Biological Sciences Program Department Site
BSCI135
Amazing Green: Plants that Transformed the World
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, SCIS
An interactive way to learn about plants and science, focusing on how plants have changed human history, the biology of their growth, and the science behind their use.
(Sponsoring Dept: CBMG). Students must pay a $40.00 laboratory materials fee.
BSCI145
The Insect Apocalypse: Real or Imagined?
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, SCIS
An article in the New York Times, in 2018, declared an "Insect Apocalypse" that for the first time brought the general, unexplained declines in insects to the public and suggested a catastrophe awaits our planet. Scientists have documented the loss of insect species at a rate exceeding the extinction rates associated with the major geological events in the Earth's history. The insect apocalypse, called the "insect decline" among researchers, potentially could lead to the demise of all terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Based on science and research, students will be provided background, and discover on their own, the diversity of the form and functions of insects, as well as how they evolved and persisted for 400 million years. The course, designed for students of any major, celebrates the incredible variation of insect life and what they do to support life on our planet. The course will highlight the use of scientific research to understand and respond to the global crisis.
Students must pay a $40.00 laboratory materials fee.
BSCI223
General Microbiology
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, SCIS
Prerequisite: BSCI170 and BSCI171; or BSCI105.
Credit only granted for: BSCI223 or BSCI283.
Fundamental concepts in morphology, physiology, genetics, immunology, ecology, and pathogenic microbiology. Applications of microbiology to medicine, the food industry and biotechnology.
(Sponsoring Dept.: CBMG) Students must pay a $40.00 laboratory materials fee.
BSCI283
Principles of Microbiology
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, SCIS
Prerequisite: BSCI222.
Restriction: Must be in a major within Biological Sciences; or permission of CMNS-Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics.
Credit only granted for: BSCI223 or BSCI283.
Additional information: Priority given to BSCI, BCHM and CHEM majors.
Introduction to microorganisms designed for science majors. Genetic principles underlying microbial abilities; microbial structure-function relationships; metabolism, physiology, and ecology of microorganisms; interactions between microorganisms (including pathogens) and their hosts.
(Sponsoring Dept.: CBMG). Students must pay a $40.00 laboratory materials fee.
CCJS
Criminology and Criminal Justice Department Site
CCJS325
Slavery in the Twenty First Century: Combating Human Trafficking
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
The trafficking of human beings in its historical, legal, economic, political and social contexts. Scope of the global problem, different forms of human trafficking, and regional trends and practices. Roles of government, the international community and individual actors. Strategies to combat trafficking.
CHSE
Counseling, Higher Education, and Special Education
CHSE205
Disability: From Stigma and Sideshow to Mainstream and Main Street
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: EDSP289I or CHSE205.
Formerly: EDSP289I.
Explores the cultural, historical, educational, and medical roots of difference among human beings and examines the impact of cultural and technological changes on individuals traditionally identified as disabled. The course is designed to develop a broad understanding of the concept of "disability" and the emerging technologies that shape contemporary understanding of this phenomenon and the lives of those considered disabled.
CLAS
Classics Department Site
CLAS170
Ancient Myths and Modern Lives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Cross-listed with: RELS170.
Credit only granted for: CLAS170 or RELS170.
Additional information: This course cannot be taken for language credit.
What are myths and why do we tell them? What powers do myths have? We will tackle these questions by looking at the enduring and fascinating myths from ancient Greece and Rome. In addition to studying how they shaped ancient societies, we will also look at their modern influence and reflect upon the power that myths still hold in our contemporary world. Taught in English.
CLAS276
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: CLAS276 or CLAS289A.
Formerly: CLAS289A.
America, from its very origins as an independent nation, saw itself as the new Rome: its system of government is built on Roman precedents, its national buildings look as if they came from the Roman Forum, and its leisure activities take us to stadiums modeled on the Colosseum. America's relationship to Rome, however, raises its greatest anxiety: will America fall as Rome did? In 1776, the year of American independence, Edward Gibbon published his History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire; America has been thinking about the trajectory of its history alongside Rome's from the very beginning.
CMSC
Computer Science Department Site
CMSC116
You and I, and Generative AI
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Restriction: Must not have completed CMSC216 or higher.
This course will explore whether and how generative AI can be developed to support human values and promote human autonomy, and how the context of the deployment of AI may impact answers to this question. Entire industries are being transformed by AI technology, much of which is driven by the recent meteoric advances in generative AI: the variety of AI that produces full content, such as documents, images, speech, and video. These advances have enabled many people to do things they previously were incapable of - such as essay writing or adding special effects to home movies - but have also brought about a series of ethical questions around their development and use - such as the role of AI in Hollywood brought into the public eye through the 2023 writer's strike. These developments raise fundamental questions around whether it is even possible to develop generative AI technology that empowers rather than replaces people, and which serves human values such as rights, justice, and dignity. It also raises the question: Is generative AI different from other technologies that can be used toward both positive and negative ends? Different disciplines have different ways of answering questions around human values, whether it's the social sciences, the humanities, or computer science. In this course, you will not only learn about the challenges of developing values-centered generative AI technology, but also actively participate in crafting tomorrow's solutions.
Restriction: Must not have completed CMSC216 or higher.
COMM
Communication Department Site
COMM385
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: COMM385 or COMM498I (Spring 2014).
Formerly: COMM498I (Spring 2014).
Explores contemporary theories of influence and their implications for communication practice. Topics include power and influence, logical theory, rhetorical theory, persuasion theory, framing theory, social influence theory, and propagation of influence in mediated social networks.
CPSS
College Park Scholars-Science, Technology and Society
CPSS225
College Park Scholars Capstone: Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Prerequisite: CPSS100.
Restriction: Must be in the College Park Scholars Science, Technology & Society (CPSS) program.
Formerly: CPSP227.
Exploration and understanding of ways science and technology shape and are shaped by society.
CPSS240
College Park Scholars: Science, Technology & Society - Service-Learning Practicum
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Restriction: Matriculation into the College Park Scholars Science, Technology & Society (CPSS) program; or permission of instructor.
Supervised Service-Learning practicum in issues related to science, technology and society.
Most of the class times will be spent at area Prince George's schools with partnering robotics teams. Consult the class requirements and locations provided in the syllabus at the beginning of the class.

This course requires a $61 background check fee for working in Prince George's County K-12 schools.
ECON
Economics Department Site
The Department of Economics enforces course prerequisites. Students who do not meet the course prerequisites will be administratively dropped from the course.
ECON185
Energy: Crisis or Breakthrough?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Will we face an energy crisis in the near future, or will technological breakthroughs solve problems? Will we destroy the environment by careless use of polluting energy, or we will find new and clean sources of energy that resolves the environmental issue once and for all? Will politicians and governments succeed in agreeing on a coherent strategy to deal with global issues related to energy, or do we expect individual countries to move in different directions and exacerbate the problems? Students will explore the demand and supply sides of the energy market and their relationships with government policies and environmental concerns. Students will also analyze empirical evidence to better understand the factors affecting energy production and consumption in the past and possible directions in the future. By examining past situations when technological change mitigated problems in energy markets, we can make informed predictions about what could happen next.
EDHD
Education, Human Development Department Site
EDHD310
Your Brain on Education: The Neuroscience of Learning and Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Prerequisite: PSYC100.
Investigation linking research in the brain science of learning and development, including the neural basis of academic skills, to achievement, disability, and broader applications to classroom learning. This course will focus on areas of education including language (spoken and written), conceptual change, numerical/quantitative processing, and social cognition as well as burgeoning areas of neuroscientific research in general cognitive processes such as attention, memory, and executive processing. These topics will be discussed with respect to typical and atypical development with some focus on developmental disabilities including autism, specific language impairment, reading and math impairment, and attention deficit disorders among others. This course will focus on both the theoretical perspectives and pragmatic issues of how evidence regarding brain development can or may be translated into useful or misleading information for educators, professionals, and parents/guardians of our children.
ENEE
Electrical & Computer Engineering Department Site
ENEE200
Technology and Consequences: Engineering, Ethics, and Humanity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENEE200 or ENES200.
What makes a technology socially responsible? At UMD, the Fearless Ideas campaign asks us to aim our enthusiasm for technology at big real problems. At the same time, we are coming to appreciate the increasingly complex nature of technological systems as they become integrated into all forms of infrastructure, we realize they may be unpredictable, interdependent on social and biological systems, and have unintended consequences. In this midst of this complexity, people make decisions with far reaching impacts. How then do we follow our passion for technology and innovation but also stay skeptical in a way that allows us to consider the potential and shortcomings of technology? Designed for both engineering and non-engineering students wishing to explore and assess the impact of engineering technology on society and the role of society in generating that technology.
Non-majors should register for ENES200 or choose the holdfile option. Department will release available seats to students in the holdfile after the last day of Early Registration for freshmen.
ENES
Engineering Science
ENES200
Technology and Consequences: Engineering, Ethics and Humanity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENEE200 or ENES200.
What makes a technology socially responsible? At UMD, the Fearless Ideas campaign asks us to aim our enthusiasm for technology at big real problems. At the same time, we are coming to appreciate the increasingly complex nature of technological systems as they become integrated into all forms of infrastructure, we realize they may be unpredictable, interdependent on social and biological systems, and have unintended consequences. In this midst of this complexity, people make decisions with far reaching impacts. How then do we follow our passion for technology and innovation but also stay skeptical in a way that allows us to consider the potential and shortcomings of technology? Designed for both engineering and non-engineering students wishing to explore and assess the impact of engineering technology on society and the role of society in generating that technology.
ENES210
Entrepreneurial Opportunity Analysis and Decision-Making in 21st Century Technology Ventures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENES210 or ENES461.
This multi-disciplinary course helps students learn the principles of entrepreneurial opportunity analysis and decision-making in an increasingly dynamic and technically-inclined society. Emphasis is placed on how aspiring technology entrepreneurs can develop their entrepreneurial perspectives to develop winning entrepreneurial plans for their future ventures.
All questions regarding this course should bedirected to mtecheducation@umd.edu.
ENES240
Ethical, Policy and Social Implications of Science and Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Restriction: Must be in the Science, Technology, Ethics and Policy minor.
Cross-listed with: PLCY240.
Credit only granted for: ENES240 or PLCY240.
Asks students to think about how society should manage complexity, transformation, and uncertainty with an eye on developing a broader sense of ethics and social responsibility. Introduces analytical frameworks, concepts, and data collection techniques that interdisciplinary scholars use to map relationships among science, technology and society and generate important questions about the future of society.
ENGL
English Department Site
ENGL125
Why Poetry Matters
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Poetry is most often understood as self-expression; it's also communal expression, and cultural expression; it's also a particular kind of construction made out of language. Explore the art form called poetry, including its formal properties, its conventions, and its legacy of experimentation. What role does poetry play in how we think about the human condition; what constitutes knowledge and wisdom, interior subjectivity and collective identity; and how shall this knowledge be used in confronting new challenges and the perennial questions: how to live with oneself, and as oneself; in time, and with others; here, where we reside; and elsewhere, where we imagine ourselves going. This is a hands-on course in reading and practicing the art of poetry, including short critical and creative writing exercises.
ENGL142
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENGL142 or ENGL289M.
Formerly: ENGL289M.
What does the literature of Maryland teach us about our state's past, present, and future? "Literary Maryland" explores this question by taking students on a tour of our state's prose, poetry, and drama from colonization to the present. In addition to reading fascinating writing and visiting interesting places, you'll learn how the Chesapeake was formed; why nobody sings the entire national anthem; and what led Baltimore to name its football team after a poem written by a Virginian.
ENGL143
Visualizing Knowledge: From Data to Images
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Explores how technology and people shape our current age of information through the various forms of visually representing information. Visualizations do not show us things that are evident--visualizations make things evident. We will thus examine the history of visualization practices, the theories of image-making that guide their production, and the current state of the art. Students will engage critically with a wide range of information visualization practices to gain an understanding of the work involved in producing them and their histories. Students will also seek out contemporary visualizations, interact with the practitioners who produce them, and produce their own visualization as a response or critique.
ENSP
Environmental Science and Policy Department Site
ENSP250
Lawns in the Landscape: Environmental Hero or Villain?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Cross-listed with PLSC250.
Credit only granted for: ENSP250 or PLSC250.
Examination of the lawn as an element in the anthropogenic landscape and its influence on global warming, regional air and water quality, ecological diversity, mammalian pesticide exposure and consumptive water use. Demographic and socioeconomic factors are examined in the context of being predictors of landscape aesthetic desires and lawn management behaviors. Policies that incentivize lawn alternatives or changes in lawn management behavior are discussed.
FMSC
Family Science Department Site
FMSC190
Man Up! Where Are The Fathers?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
An examination of changing fatherhood roles, health, and inequality in diverse families. Focus will be on masculinities and disparities among men by race and class; provider role expectations; and trauma and violence faced by men in contemporary society.
GEMS
Gemstone
GEMS104
Topics in Science, Technology and Society (STS)
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Prerequisite: GEMS100.
Restriction: Must be in the Gemstone program.
An examination of how cultural, economic, political and social forces shape scientific and technological systems and, conversely, how scientific and technological systems have affected the culture, economies, organization and politics of societies. Students in the course will form small teams to carry out semester-long research on socio/technical topics related to the course theme chosen for that specific semester.
GEMS104 discussions will be various times through the week beginning January 24 and running through spring break on March 18. Beginning with week 9, March 28 (the week after spring break), GEMS104 lectures will continue to be on Tuesdays from 5-6:15pm and discussions will move to Thursdays (March 31 is the first Thursday) from 5-6:15pm.
GEOG
Geographical Sciences Department Site
GEOG140
Natural Disasters: Earthquakes, Floods, and Fires
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Catastrophic Environmental Events (CCE) that are becoming more common in this time of global environmental change and it is essential that today's students be equipped with the knowledge and skills to be leaders as we, as a society, understand the upheaval that these CCEs are causing. Students will examine how CEEs shape human society and ecosystem from the interdisciplinary perspective afforded by the field of Geography. Students will use the latest geographic science concepts and techniques in exploring these events. Using satellite imagery they will gain a multi-scale perspective of the ecological and societal aspects of the events.
GEOG172
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Earth observations from space enable the mapping and monitoring of our changing planet. This survey course reviews current observational capabilities and examines scientific applications in quantifying global environmental change. Drivers and outcomes of key dynamics will be illustrated and discussed, including sea and continental ice loss, deforestation, ocean warming, urbanization, agricultural expansion and intensification, and vegetation response to climate change.
GEOL
Geology Department Site
GEOL123
Causes and Consequences of Global Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Cross-listed with: AOSC123.
Credit only granted for: AOSC123, GEOG123, or GEOL123.
Study of the major components of Earth's climate system and climate change history. Discussion of 21st century climate change prediction, mitigation and adaptation efforts.
GEOL204
Dinosaurs, Early Humans, Ancestors, and Evolution; The Fossil Record of Vanished Worlds of the Prehistoric Past
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
What good is the fossil record? What relevance or insights might the remains of ancient living things have for our modern world? This course examines how the record of ancient life was made, and how we use diverse scientific techniques to reveal the information it contains. We will look at how the various inhabitants of our planet changed through time, and how different ecosystems such as reefs, forests, and grasslands were assembled. We will see how our own species came to be, and of our spread across the world from our ancestral home in Africa. We'll examine how the fossil record contains evidence of climate changes and extinction events far exceeding what we are currently experiencing, and how we can use these as warnings for our future. We'll address who are the owners and stakeholders in the evidence of the fossil world. Students will learn how to read and interpret the primary scientific literature, and how to present scientific information to others through various media.
GVPT
Government and Politics Department Site
GVPT203
The Challenge of Authoritarianism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
An introduction to the persistent challenge of authoritarianism. The course explores the nature of authoritarianism and its evolution from ancient through modern times. Students will study how authoritarian regimes vary, why citizens sometimes comply with them, and when and how citizens rebel. The course concludes with a review of contemporary authoritarianism, focusing on its resilience in the Middle East and East Asia and its potential for a resurgence in the US and Europe.
GVPT289D
How to Make Better Decisions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
The problem with decisions is that we rarely, if ever, find out if our decisions were good or bad. Was choosing your major, for instance, a good decision or could you have made a better one? I don't think most of us would ever know the answer to this question. So, is it possible that we regularly make bad decisions but don't know that we do? And, if so, how can we fix something if we don't know it is broken? In fact, we do regularly make bad decisions. This has been shown in many experimental studies some of which will be covered in this class. What is more, for some types of decision problems we are hardwired to make mistakes. This means that we are bound to go wrong regardless of how much we know or how smart we are. So, what can we do to remedy this problem? Quite a bit, as it turns out.
HACS
ACES-Cybersecurity
HACS208A
Accounting and Economic Aspects of Cybersecurity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living-Learning Program.
In today's interconnected digital world, cybersecurity has become one of the most important issues confronting organizations in both the private and public sectors of an economy. Indeed, cybersecurity is a national and economic security priority in countries throughout the world. This is an interdisciplinary Honors Seminar offered as part of UMD's ACES program. The primary objective of this course is to discuss the relationships among accounting, economics and cybersecurity, with a focus on the important roles of accounting and economics in understanding the issues related to cybersecurity. A basic framework for assessing the interactions among accounting, economics, and cybersecurity will be developed and discussed. A secondary objective of the course is to assist ACES students in developing their ability to conduct original and applied research on topics related to "accounting and economic aspects of cybersecurity."
HESP
Hearing and Speech Sciences Department Site
HESP214
The Research Behind Headlines on Words, Thought, and Behavior
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HNUH278A.
Credit only granted for: HNUH278A or HESP214.
How does the human mind use language? Type "Language Science News" into your Google search bar. Among the more than 3 billion hits, headlines like "What is love? It depends what language you speak" and "Science's English dominance hinders diversity" invite you to think about the impact of words on thought and behavior. These are stories about how humans acquire and use language, but they ultimately address big questions about how we experience knowledge itself. In a world of unprecedented access to science journalism, did you ever read a headline about human behavior and wonder: How do we know? This class takes up the elegant ways cognitive scientists design experiments to answer crucial questions about language and thought, brain and behavior, that have no intuitive answers. Students will dive deep into the media coverage of their favorite claims about what we know, debate the psychological science behind these claims, and develop transferable critical-thinking skills in the process.
HISP
Historic Preservation
HISP200
The Everyday and the American Environment
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Jointly offered with HISP615.
An introduction to the theories of the everyday within the context of the American built environment. Focuses primarily on the American experience of underrepresented, minority, and/or immigrant communities; both historical and contemporary. Attempts to challenge what is meant by American in describing the American everyday built environment.
HIST
History Department Site
HIST131
The History of the American Dream
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: HIST131 or HIST289J.
Formerly: HIST289J.
An introduction to the way Americans thought of themselves in the past, and their often conflicting visions of what constituted the American Dream. Central questions will include whether or not Americans have always envisioned their country as a land of equality, opportunity, democracy, and freedom and whether or not their ideas of what these values meant changed or remained the same over time.
HIST223
Globalizing the American Revolution
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HNUH218C.
Credit only granted for: HNUH218C or HIST223.
How is the American Revolution a creation story in the making of our multi-cultural and interconnected modern world? Consider the Declaration of Independence. When first published on July 5, 1776, it was printed by an immigrant Irishman on Dutch paper that had been brought over from England. This was the first such declaration of independence ever issued, but its ideas and forms traveled far and wide. More than 100 other declarations of independence have been issued since then. The people that declaration mobilized are similarly diverse: the American Revolution is as much the story of Creek farmers, Spanish soldiers, French slaves, Canadian fugitives, Indian tea-growers, and African statesmen as it is of the Minutemen and Sons of Liberty. In this globe-trotting class, students will be positioned to debate how the familiar story of the American Revolution changes when we place it in transnational context.
HIST289A
Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Medieval Spain: Tolerance, Oppression, and the Problematic Past
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: RELS289C.
Credit only granted for: HIST289A or RELS289C.
For 800 years, medieval Spain was home to one of the most religiously diverse societies in European history. Despite frequent hostilities, the interactions of Spanish Jews, Christians, and Muslims produced a flowering of science, theology, and literature in an often remarkably tolerant climate. Students will learn how medieval Spanish people themselves experienced interreligious contact and conflict. They will also discover the modern pressures, prejudices, and ideals that have shaped historians interpretations of medieval Spain.
HIST289N
The Politics of Sexuality in America: A Historical Approach
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: WGSS298N.
Credit only granted for: HIST289N or WGSS298N.
Why do particular issues about sexuality hold such an important place in American political debates? What animates these controversies and what can a historical perspective on these issues add to our understanding of modern sexual politics? This class explores the historical sexual politics that undergird contemporary debates concerning sexuality in America. It focuses on topics that garner significant public attention - Reproductive rights - LGBTQ rights - Sexting - and explores the histories that undergird Americans disagreements.
HIST289V
What Does It Mean to be An American?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
This course seeks to understand the on-going crisis over national identity and purpose by examining the many factors that go into the big stew known as America.
HNUH
University Honors
HNUH218B
Frederick Douglass's America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
What does it mean to be free in the United States? The concept of freedom was embedded in the nation's political culture in the Declaration of Independence, and it has remained a cherished and contested ideal. We can interrogate this concept through the life and times of Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), who dreamed eloquently of freedom, thought carefully about its limits, and worked ardently to build a firmer freedom for a broader population. With Douglass as our guide, we will examine the survival of slavery in a nation built on freedom, images of the expanding United States as a land of opportunity, and the complex meanings and tremendous costs of freedom struggles during the nineteenth century. This history will push you to think critically about the contested concepts that shape our lives, and to consider the values and the perils of a society that positions freedom as its highest ideal.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH218B is the required I-Series course in the Freedom at Stake thematic cluster. Freedom at Stake courses will be offered through Spring 2024.
HNUH228B
Redesigning Life: Prospects and Consequences
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
What is at stake for our world as humans seek to redesign biological organisms? Biotechnology advances are enabling us to read, edit and write genomes, including our own. This revolution has been fueled by the quest to understand and cure disease. Yet, these innovations have far-reaching consequences beyond medicine and will reshape our world in ways we can only imagine - or fear. The course will challenge students to confront the risks and rewards for them, their family, their community, and their future, as biotechnology moves out of specialized laboratories and into homes. A demystifying, low-tech approach will introduce them to contemporary genome redesign, clarifying the current limitations and future goals of the field. Students will debate whether redesigning plants and animals will enhance or inhibit momentum in human genome engineering, and formulate their own arguments about who should be able to use these tools and where, who decides, and how much society is willing to risk.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH228B is the required I-Series course in the Redesigning Life thematic cluster. Redesigning Life courses will be offered through Spring 2024.
HNUH238B
Systemic Racism in Public Opinion and Policy Attitudes
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
If we believe that racism is bad, why do we still support racist policies? No matter how hard we work to end it, the challenge of racism seems here to stay. Though attitudes toward racial segregation in schools have changed, schools are more racially isolated than ever. There is a disconnect in American public life between support for the idea of equality and resistance to policies aimed at addressing racism, and a deep divide over how to eliminate inequality. This course focuses on public opinion and how these attitudes inform public policy. Can we address systemic inequality through public engagement and by changing the national narrative with the support of evidence? Does change come from shifting views or shifting policies? Students will explore these issues through a case study on racial equity in the Honors College. By developing skills in evidence-based op-ed writing and survey-based experiments, students will add their voices to these pressing public debates of our time.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH238B is the required I-Series course in the Systemic Racism thematic cluster. Systemic Racism courses will be offered through Spring 2024.
HNUH248B
Setting the Table: The Challenges and Opportunities for Sustainable Agriculture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
What will the farm of the future look like? Our current food system is plagued with paradoxes. An estimated 41.2 million Americans are classified as food insecure, but we produce 4,000 calories per person per day. Between 2008 and 2012, 1.6 million acres of long-term grasslands were converted to crop production, yet more than 350,000 acres of farmland were lost to development annually. This course will investigate what determines the food we eat and how we can make changes today that will improve both food access and the environment for future generations. Students will learn agribusiness, as well as alternative food movements and regenerative agriculture. They will meet experts from the USDA and Maryland producers. By growing their own vegetables, tracking food consumption, and exploring family history linked to farming, students will leave the course as conscious consumers empowered to navigate food system reform.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH248B is the required I-Series course in the Global Crises, Sustainable Futures thematic cluster. Global Crises, Sustainable Futures courses will be offered through Spring 2024.
HNUH258B
The Ecology of Childhood Poverty
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
How does poverty shape the relationship between humans and their environment? It may seem obvious that being poor in childhood has enduring effects on development. What is less obvious is how experiencing poverty in childhood shapes relationships between children and their surroundings, including family interactions, peer relationships, adult dynamics, and the health of the community. Less clear still is the extent to which positive interactions with caretakers and social supports can protect children from potential harm as they grow up. This course focuses on the complexity of poverty as a social force and community concern. Students will investigate the nature of poverty through an interdisciplinary lens that includes social theory, developmental psychology, and empirical studies. After analyzing various approaches to the study of child poverty, students will be in a position to use research on parenting and poverty to evaluate public policy and social programs in their own backyard.
HNUH258B is the required I-Series course in the Metamorphosis thematic cluster. Metamorphosis courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH268B
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
What traction does the past have in society today? This course explores globally how the past gains traction in society today and becomes remade in the present. That inquiry will be guided by the idea of heritage, as it mobilizes the past within a broad spectrum of social, political, economic, and environmental issues. We will examine western relationships to the past as intimately tied to property and the drive to plunder, collect, and catalogue. Increasingly, conceptions of heritage include landscapes, as well as intangibles such as music, dance, and folklore. This broad definition honors the diversity of present-day relations to the past, even as it strains heritage management models that are organized around definitions and regulations, and bear the weight of historical injustice. Close examination of heritage at work within global crisis and struggle prompts questions on who owns the past, and who owns up to it. What do we owe the past, and will we be good ancestors to the future?
HNUH268B is the required I-Series course in the Heritage thematic cluster. Heritage courses will be offered through Spring 2025
HNUH278B
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
How do ordinary citizens power democracy? At the age of 18, every American citizen is endowed with the right to vote, but what if democracy demands more than voting? With democratic processes seemingly in peril all around us, what can and should ordinary citizens do to safeguard democracy? Looking beyond the basic right to vote, this class will instead explore the complex ecosystem of citizenship practices necessary for collective self-governance. Turning to both philosophy and history, the course material addresses the power and peril of such civic habits as mutual aid, economic participation, tolerance, attention, organizing, protest, and more. We consider what resources these habits require, what virtues they inspire, and what happens when they conflict with each other. Students in this course will acquire the tools to develop and act on their own answer to the pressing question of what it will take to save democracy.
HNUH288B
Race, Reproduction and Rights
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Can humanity thrive without ensuring reproductive freedom? The 2022 US Supreme Court decision that the right to an abortion is unconstitutional has generated impassioned debate about women's rights and access to reproductive health care in the US and globally. This debate opens space to think beyond "pro-choice or pro-life" polarization and create conditions that promote equity, respect for rights, and a healthy society. These conditions would need to address injustices such as the racism, gender inequalities, marginalization, and colonization that produce disparities in reproductive health care and jeopardize the well-being of individuals, families, communities, and countries. Who controls the bodies of marginalized women and men? What is the meaning of reproductive rights for people who have little power? This course challenges students to bring together multiple disciplines, become critical data consumers, and develop innovative ways to use this knowledge to influence policy.
INST
Information Studies
INST104
Design Across Campus
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
What is design, who does it, and how is it done? There is no one answer to this question--it depends on who you ask. The answers to these questions vary across disciplines and across the University campus. This course, designed with modules from contributors in UMD programs including Information Studies, Human-Computer Interaction, Graphic Design, Immersive Media Arts, Journalism, Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Engineering, and Policy, will introduce students to the goals and values, approaches, skills, and practices of diverse fields of design. It will enable students to identify grand challenges in design and serve as a sorting hat to help students find a design practice that matches their own values, approaches, skills and goals.
INST154
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Examines Apollo mission, one of the greatest engineering accomplishments of all time, in which Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. Since the mission, people have asked: if we can land on the moon, why can't we eliminate poverty? Why can't we cure cancer? Why can't we prevent global warming? Asks what were the social, political, financial, scientific, engineering, operational, and human aspects of the Apollo program that came together to make the moon landings possible?
INST155
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: INFM289I or INST155.
Formerly: INFM289I.
Introduces methods for analyzing and understanding how people use social media - social networking websites, blogging and microblogging, and other forms of online interaction and content generation - and their societal implications. Introduces students to the science and social science of network analysis. Through real world examples, including analysis of their own social networks, students develop skills for describing and understanding the patterns and usage of services like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and others.
INST204
Designing Fair Systems
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: INST208D or INST204.
Formerly: INST208D.
Reviews how specific values are built into different automated decision-making systems as an inevitable result of constructing mechanisms meant to produce specific outcomes. These values create differential outcomes for the different people enmeshed in these systems, but both these values and these systems can be changed to support different values and different outcomes. The class serves as an introduction to the emerging field of algorithmic bias that bridges the disciplines of information science, computer science, law, policy, philosophy, sociology, urban planning, and others.
JOUR
Journalism Department Site
JOUR282
Beyond Facebook: How Social Media are Transforming Society, Culture, Business and Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR289F or JOUR282.
Formerly: JOUR289F.
How has social media changed the world, and how has the world changed social media? This course explores how social media has influenced relationships, culture, industry, politics, and the information environment, as well as how significant global events and technological advancements have contributed to the evolution of social media. This course gives students a broad contextual understanding of social media that they may apply in their daily lives as well as future academic inquiry.
JOUR283
Probing War: Investigative Narratives and American Conflicts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR283 or JOUR289J.
Formerly: JOUR289J.
Students will explore the realities of war through the work of journalists who pushed beyond the daily headlines, some risking life and limb, to challenge official versions and document uncomfortable realities about American conflicts.
JOUR284
Scandal: Exposing Corruption, Justice, and Vice in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR289P, JOUR284 or HONR239J.
Formerly: JOUR289P, HONR239J .
What are the ingredients of a juicy scandal? Money? Sex? Power? How are scandals uncovered? Why does society punish some scoundrels but not others? Come explore both serious and salacious scandals with a professor who's an expert in both--and who once exposed many scandals himself when he was an investigative reporter. This class examines scandals in politics, science, religion, social media, business, government, sports, and higher education; feeding frenzies, tabloid scandalmongering, undercover reporting, apologies, and cancel culture. Learn why even trivial scandals matter--and how scandals reflect what we value and ultimately who we are.
JOUR289I
Information 3.0: Exploring Technological Tools
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Students will expand their understanding of various digital information and the issues it raises, evaluate media research investigating how users interact with information for different purposes, analyze how diverse audiences seek, select, share and produce various types of digital information, and evaluate the ethics related to digital privacy and security.
JWST
Jewish Studies Department Site
JWST319P
Arts & Humanities in Social Innovation, Change, and Justice: Do Good Now
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: ARHU380.
Credit only granted for: ARHU380, BSOS388B, JWST319P, or PLCY388D.
The course serves as the core course for the Arts-and-Humanities track in PLCY's minor in "Nonprofit Leadership and Social Innovation." Students will be introduced to the role that the Arts and Humanities can play in social innovation and social change, while exploring various mechanisms for achieving impact with a focus on advancing social justice, equity and systems change. This course deepens understandings of nonprofit leadership, entrepreneurship and social innovation by guiding students through the creation and implementation of social change projects and ventures of their choice.
Cross-listed with ARHU380. For Spring 2022: Credit granted only for JWST319P, ARHU380, BSOS388B, or PLCY388D.

The course serves as the core course for the Arts-and-Humanities track in PLCY's minor in "Nonprofit Leadership and Social Innovation." Students will be introduced to the role that the Arts and Humanities can play in social innovation and social change, while exploring various mechanisms for achieving impact with a focus on advancing social justice, equity and systems change. This course deepens understandings of nonprofit leadership, entrepreneurship and social innovation by guiding students through the creation and implementation of social change projects and ventures of their choice.
KNES
Kinesiology Department Site
KNES225
Hoop Dreams: Black Masculinity and Sport
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: KNES289R OR KNES225.
Formerly: KNES289R.
Has sport disadvantaged African American males? This course critically examines sport as a site where notions of black masculinity are publicly debated, critiqued, challenged, celebrated, and also transformed. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores how sport has been invoked across the political and ideological spectrum to interrogate a number of issues impacting the life chances of young, African Americans males including educational attainment, poverty, social mobility, racism, cultural production, and notions of masculinity.
LARC
Landscape Architecture Department Site
LARC151
Urban Agriculture: Designing and Assessing Edible Landscapes
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Students will examine the growing development of urban agriculture and edible landscapes. Urban agriculture has seen a recent growth and interest in cities across the globe. From Paris to New York, from Baltimore to Detroit, urban agriculture is an emerging land use to address a variety of needs. Redevelopment, food deserts, community engagement and environmental justice are just some of the issues and topics that are connected to the recent growth of urban agriculture. This course will take a critical examination of urban agriculture's contribution to the food system, its input and outputs in the urban landscape, and the planning and design of urban agriculture and edible landscapes.
LING
Linguistics Department Site
LING272
Biophysics of Language
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Examines the nature of mental representation of language in the physiology of the mind/brain, how it evolved, how it emerges in learners' minds, and how it decays through injury and illness. Insights from linguistics, cognitive psychology, neuroscience, animal behavior, molecular biology, and biophysics are brought to bear on how an abstract systematic behavior can arise within an animal brain.
MLAW
MPower Undergraduate Law Programs
MLAW150
Law in a Just Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must be in the College Park Scholars - Justice and Legal Thought program.
An exploration of the theoretical questions relating to such fundamental questions of jurisprudence as "what is law?" and "how can law be deployed as both an enemy and ally of justice?
NFSC
Nutrition and Food Science Department Site
NFSC220
Diet: Is it a cause or a solution
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
If diet is a very straightforward topic; then why and how does this simple matter result in complicated health problems? Diet can provide a simple solution to numerous health issues. So, why do many people fail to follow this seemingly simple solution and still suffer from obesity and other diet-related diseases? Diet is a topic that most people know but few people understand. In addition, diet has become one of the most important lenses for looking at a variety of social, economic, and cultural issues. Since the concept of diet is continuum and has multifaceted aspects, we need to understand it in broad and multidisciplinary perspectives including social, cultural and economic aspects.
PHIL
Philosophy Department Site
PHIL202
Know Thyself: Wisdom Through Cognitive Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PHIL209N or PHIL202.
Formerly: PHIL209N.
How do we improve our decision making? Cognitive science demonstrates that self-knowledge isn't as easy as we think, and that there are numerous biases and fallacies that impact our decision-making in ways that are hard for us to be aware of. In this course you will learn what some of these are and how they have been discovered, and you will explore potential strategies for avoiding these fallacies and for making wiser choices.
PHIL203
The Rights and Wrongs of Killing People
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PHIL209J or PHIL203.
Formerly: PHIL209J.
Virtually everyone thinks it's permissible to kill people only in special circumstances. But why is killing usually wrong? Is it ever acceptable to kill an innocent human being intentionally? This course raises these and related questions and examines cases such as terrorism, suicide, abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, war. Except for a brief discussion of animals, all the controversies considered deal with killing and causing death to human beings.
PHIL205
Are Sports Ethical?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PHIL205, PHIL209G, or HONR229E.
Formerly: HONR229E.
Things happen routinely in sports that would seem morally unacceptable in other context: violence between the participants, attempts to trick the referee, fans hoping that some players would do embarrassingly badly, spectators feeling anger towards whole nations. Nonetheless, all of this may seem reasonable and even justifiable within a sporting context. This course will investigate the ethical structure of sports, and what it tells us about the ethics of everyday life. Philosophy will provide the primary disciplinary context, but we will also think about sociological, legal and anthropological perspectives on sports. Issues will include the nature of sportsmanship, what types of violence in sports are acceptable, drug use in sports, what it means to be a fan (for example, asking why loyalty to your team is valuable) and how our view of sports interacts with our view of nations. By the end of the course you should have gained familiarity with a variety of ethical concepts and a sensitivity to the ethical issues in sports. You should also find that by thinking about morality in the context of sports, you will look at larger ethical issues in new ways.
PHYS
Physics Department Site
PHYS137
The Quantum Wave: understanding the potential impact of quantum information on society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Additional information: This class is not open to students in the STEM major.
Advances in quantum information science and engineering (QISE), particularly quantum computing, have the potential to significantly disrupt and change the day-to-day lives of every person. In this course, we'll learn about the confluence of engineering, physics, and computer science that make this field so promising and develop tools to make sense of the scientific, societal, and ethical implications of these emerging technologies. Students will study, in depth, applications of QISE that are of particular and personal interest to share with others how they envision navigating a facet of day-to-day life that has been disrupted by advances in QISE. No prior background in STEM required. This course is only open to non-STEM majors.
PLCY
Public Policy
PLCY101
Great Thinkers on Public Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Great ideas in public policy, such as equality, efficiency, sovereignty, liberty, bureaucracy, democracy and security are explored through the lens of great thinkers. An introduction to the intellectual foundations of public policy, from ancient theories on collective public action through the more contemporary development of public policy as a discipline. This may start as early as the ancient Greek philosophers and their views on public action through contemporary classics of public policy. At the conclusion of the course, students will have read classic works in the field and will master the key themes that have dominated the intellectual debates about public policy over its history. Emphasis will be on the interdisciplinary foundations of public policy, through examining core disciplinary contributions from economics, political science, management, philosophy, and other relevant disciplines.
PLCY201
Public Leaders and Active Citizens
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PLCY201 or PUAF201.
Formerly: PUAF201.
Aims to inspire, teach and engage students in the theory and practice of public leadership from the local to the national to the global level. Students will learn and apply diverse approaches to leadership in a multicultural society while developing an understanding of key frameworks and practices necessary to foster collective action across private, public, and nonprofit sectors. This course will allow students to become informed citizens able to reason critically and persuasively about public matters Students will also explore and assess their own personal values, beliefs, and purpose as they develop their leadership potential.
PLCY240
Ethical, Policy and Social Implications of Science and Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Restriction: Must be in the Science, Technology, Ethics and Policy minor.
Cross-listed with: ENES240.
Credit only granted for: ENES240 or PLCY240.
Asks students to think about how society should manage complexity, transformation, and uncertainty with an eye on developing a broader sense of ethics and social responsibility. Introduces analytical frameworks, concepts, and data collection techniques that interdisciplinary scholars use to map relationships among science, technology and society and generate important questions about the future of society.
PLCY380
Innovation and Social Change: Do Good Now
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ARHU380, BSOS388B, PLCY388D, or PLCY380.
Formerly: PLCY388D.
Introduces students to the concept of social innovation while exploring the many mechanisms for achieving social impact. It is team-based, highly interactive and dynamic, and provides an opportunity for students to generate solutions to a wide range of problems facing many communities today. Deepens the students understanding of entrepreneurship and innovation practices by guiding them through the creation and implementation process as applied to a project idea of their choice.
PLSC
Plant Sciences
PLSC250
Lawns in the Landscape: Environmental Hero or Villain?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Cross-listed with ENSP250.
Credit only granted for: ENSP250 or PLSC250.
Examination of the lawn as an element in the anthropogenic landscape and its influence on global warming, regional air and water quality, ecological diversity, mammalian pesticide exposure and consumptive water use. Demographic and socioeconomic factors are examined in the context of being predictors of landscape aesthetic desires and lawn management behaviors. Policies that incentivize lawn alternatives or changes in lawn management behavior are discussed.
PSYC
Psychology Department Site
PSYC234
Living the Good Life: The Psychology of Happiness
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PSYC234 or PSYC289D.
Formerly: PSYC289D.
What are the secrets to living a happy life? Can happiness be found within the context of war, a depressed economy, violence and other major stressors? Are some people born happier than others? This course will teach you the scientific process that psychologists use to study happiness (and related emotional variables) and give you the opportunity to practice applying that process in a number of ways. You will learn how we (a) gather and critically evaluate research findings in the existing literature, (b) integrate those findings into coherent and testable theories, (c) design and conduct valid scientific research that tests those theories and extends our knowledge, and (d) effectively communicate our theories and findings to a wide range of audiences. The result of the process is a more accurate and objective understanding of happiness, and that is what prepares you to apply your scientific understanding to explain and influence a wide range of outcomes.
RELS
Religious Studies
RELS170
Ancient Myths and Modern Lives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Cross-listed with: CLAS170.
Credit only granted for: CLAS170 or RELS170.
Additional information: This course cannot be taken for language credit.
What are myths and why do we tell them? What powers do myths have? We will tackle these questions by looking at the enduring and fascinating myths from ancient Greece and Rome. In addition to studying how they shaped ancient societies, we will also look at their modern influence and reflect upon the power that myths still hold in our contemporary world. Taught in English.
RELS271
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVCC, SCIS
Credit only granted for: RELS289I or RELS271.
Formerly: RELS289I.
Draws upon examples from a wide variety of religious traditions to explore the question of what religion is and how to best understand it. Engagement with diverse approaches to religion including phenomenology and the study of "the sacred"; sociology and the study of religious communities; and questions of religious experience, ritual, and identity formation.
RELS289C
Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Medieval Spain: Tolerance, Oppression, and the Problematic Past
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HIST289A.
Credit only granted for: HIST289A or RELS289C.
For 800 years, medieval Spain was home to one of the most religiously diverse societies in European history. Despite frequent hostilities, the interactions of Spanish Jews, Christians, and Muslims produced a flowering of science, theology, and literature in an often remarkably tolerant climate. Students will learn how medieval Spanish people themselves experienced interreligious contact and conflict. They will also discover the modern pressures, prejudices, and ideals that have shaped historians interpretations of medieval Spain.
RUSS
Russian Department Site
RUSS287
The Power of the Word: Freedom of Speech in the U.S. and Russia
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: RUSS287 or RUSS289I.
Formerly: RUSS289I.
Additional information: Taught in English.
The central theme is the abiding human propensity to ask questions, to use language to pursue inquiry. To be a "critical thinker," one must develop the habit and discipline of asking questions and challenging assumptions. Through a comparative approach to the US and Russian experiences, we will explore the role of language and its power in different political and social systems. We will explore such questions as: Why is free speech so fiercely defended in a democracy and such a threat to totalitarianism? What is the relationship between free speech, political power and dissent? Is the pen still mightier than the sword, even in the nuclear age? What has shaped our current attitudes toward freedom of expression? How has the concept of political free speech been extended to include freedom of expression in general, such as in the creative arts? What role do new technologies play in the arena of free speech debates? We will explore how freedom of speech and expression has been defended or its suppression justified in the US and Russia. We will practice the art of questioning and constructing counter-arguments throughout the course.
SLLC
School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures Department Site
SLLC286
Living the Good Life: Chinese Philosophy in the Modern World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Additional information: Taught in English.
Confucius, Mencius, Zhuangzi and other Chinese thinkers who lived more than 2,000 years ago would argue that the contemporary Western emphasis on self-discovery (Find yourself) and self-acceptance has led you astray. See what they have to say and discuss what relevance it has for the modern world as we study how early Chinese thinkers wrestled with questions of existence, morality, and governance. No previous knowledge of Chinese philosophy and history will be assumed and no prerequisites are required. We will discuss ideas that are both historical and relevant to students' lives. What is "the Way"? How do we cultivate spontaneity? Is there a stable self? How can we be more alive? These are questions important for ancient kings but also for UMD students choosing a major, or wondering how ARHU can benefit them.
SOCY
Sociology Department Site
SOCY200
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
A comparative, historical, interdisciplinary study of human socieities that focuses on the main components of human societies, how they are organized, how they change, and how they come to shape our collective social existence.
SOCY224
Why are We Still Talking About Race?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Exploration of the major debates and assumptions that construct individual perceptions of what race is and how race matters. Sociological and sub-cultural theories will give students a historical and present day frame with which to view race and ethnic relations in the twenty-first century.
THET
Theatre Department Site
THET251
Broadway Mashup: Remixing America Through Musical Theater
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Interrogate musical theater's political history, investigating how this uniquely American genre uses narrative, song, and dance to weave critical differences across race, ethnicity, immigration status, religion, gender, sexuality, and ability into our national fabric.
THET287
Subversive Cultures and Performance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: THET289I or THET287.
Formerly: THET289I.
Every society has rebels - those who refuse to conform to the mainstream's rigid rules, aesthetics, and beliefs. From unruly skateboarders, punk rockers, bohemian poets, and radical theater performers, to national revolutionary movements and brick-throwing anarchists - such groups form niches that are defined by their exclusion from society. We will look at how their beliefs and actions fit into a particular historical context, and how their actions drive social change.
TLPL
Teaching and Learning, Policy and Leadership Department Site
TLPL287
Inquiry Into Issues in US Public Schooling: Policies, Practice and Promise
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: TLPL288T or TLPL287.
Formerly: TLPL288T.
Students will inquire into enduring issues faced by US public education, focusing on the forces and stakeholders that have shaped current policy and practice. In addition, students will work to consider the real daily consequences of policy on the lives of students and teachers. Through crafting and researching a question of interest, employing a project based learning approach, students will take a deep dive into the most vexing issues faced by public education in the United States.
TLPL288K
Reinventing Childhood: Unschooling and Other School Alternatives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Our current factory-model schools, where students are segregated by age, spend most of their day sitting still and keeping quiet, are increasingly difficult to justify in an age of collaboration and creativity. In this course, we compare learning in schools to how children learn out of schools. Families are increasingly turning to homeschooling and unschooling to provide their children with a different sort of childhood, one where children experience far more autonomy and respect. We explore various models of alternative forms of education for children through reviewing research, readings, and videos, and by conducting in-person and zoom interviews with parents, teachers and students of each of these education approaches. We address questions such as, How can an understanding of alternative learning experiences help us reimagine schools? What new alternatives to education are people using, and what innovations might be next, as we reimagine childhood for the next generation?
WGSS
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
WGSS290
Bodies in Contention
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: WMST298D or WGSS290.
Formerly: WMST298D.
Explores the contributions of feminist scholarship in framing and resolving contemporary controversies concerning gendered bodies. It includes the ways in which knowledge about the human body has been shaped by cultural ideas of gender, race, sexuality and ability.
WGSS298N
The Politics of Sexuality in America: A Historical Approach
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HIST289N.
Credit only granted for: HIST289N or WGSS298N.
Why do particular issues about sexuality hold such an important place in American political debates? What animates these controversies and what can a historical perspective on these issues add to our understanding of modern sexual politics? This class explores the historical sexual politics that undergird contemporary debates concerning sexuality in America. It focuses on topics that garner significant public attention - Reproductive rights - LGBTQ rights - Sexting - and explores the histories that undergird Americans disagreements.