Hide Advanced Options
Courses - Summer 2024
AAST
Asian American Studies Department Site
Open Seats as of
06/12/2024 at 05:30 PM
AAST355
Asian Americans in Film
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AMST328W.
Credit only granted for: AAST355, AAST398L or AMST328W.
Formerly: 398L.
Explores how Asian Americans have historically been represented in the U.S. by Hollywood, and in turn, how independent and Hollywood Asian American filmmakers have represented themselves. It covers the history of racial, gendered, and sexualized representations of Asian Americans in Hollywood, as well as Asian American filmic responses within and outside Hollywood. It also introduces how four basic tools of film analysis mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing and sound work together to create meaning in moving images. It examines how these elements are put together in three different types of films by Asian American filmmakers: narrative, documentary, and experimental. How films function in society to circulate ideas that reproduce and challenge stereotypes about Asian Americans.
AMST
American Studies Department Site
AMST101
Introduction American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: AMST101 or AMST201.
Formerly: AMST201.
Introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of American Studies by examining concepts such as culture, identity, cultural practices, and globalization, as well as theories underlying these concepts. Engages key themes, especially constructions of difference and identity, cultures of everyday life, and America and the world.
AMST203
Popular Culture in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
An introduction to American popular culture, its historical development, and its role as a reflection of and influence on our culture and society.
AMST290
Shifting Sands: Constructing Cultural Mainstreams and Margins in the U.S.
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: AMST289A or AMST290.
Formerly: AMST289A.
Examines the construction, operation, and meaning of cultural mainstreams and margins in a range of contexts, spaces, and times in the U.S. Using a variety of primary sources, research methods, and interdisciplinary scholarship, we will explore how Americans make and assign meaning to cultural mainstreams and margins. We will examine how and why cultural margins and mainstreams shift over time and what their consequences have been for social policies, laws, power relations, and national identity.
ARCH
Architecture Department Site
ARCH225
History of World Architecture I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Pre-1500 World Architecture survey course - History of Architecture structured to develop critical thinking and visually literacy with regard to the worldwide legacy of design thinking and cultural production through architecture
ARHU
Arts and Humanities Department Site
ARHU230
Introduction to Humanities, Health, and Medicine
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Permission of ARHU-English Department.
Cross-listed with: ENGL254, HIST219N, WGSS230.
Credit only granted for: ARHU230 , ENGL289C, ENGL254, ARHU298A, HIST219N, or WGSS230.
An overview of the historical, cultural, ethical, and spiritual dimensions of medicine, human health, disease, and death from the points of view of various humanistic disciplines.
ARHU275
Scriptwriting for Theater, Film, and Television
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Cross-listed with: ENGL275.
Credit only granted for: ENGL275 or ARHU275.
Introduction to the theory and practice of scriptwriting with an opportunity to read, view, evaluate, write, and revise texts meant to be performed. Students will practice writing for the stage, film, and television and also examine selected scripts, performances, and film and television clips as models for their own creative work. Students will complete frequent writing exercises, participate in workshops, and learn to apply scholarship to the analysis and critique of scripts.
ARTH
Art History & Archaeology Department Site
ARTH200
Art and Society in Ancient and Medieval Europe and the Mediterranean
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Examines the material culture and visual expressions of Mediterranean and European societies from early times until ca. 1300 CE, emphasizing the political, social, and religious context of the works studied, the relationships of the works to the societies that created them, and the interrelationship of these societies.
ARTH201
Art and Society in the West from the Renaissance to the Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Examines representative European and American works of art from the later Middle Ages to the present, highlighting the dynamic exchange between artistic and cultural traditions both within periods and across time.
ARTH351
Picturing Contemporary Life: Art Since 1945
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Visual art since 1945, with an emphasis on North America and Europe.
CINE
Cinema and Media Studies
CINE245
Film Form and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: ENGL245.
Credit only granted for: ENGL245, CINE245 or FILM245.
Formerly: FILM245.
Introduction to film as art form and how films create meaning. Basic film terminology; fundamental principles of film form, film narrative, and film history. Examination of film technique and style over past one hundred years. Social and economic functions of film within broader institutional, economic, and cultural contexts.
CLAS
Classics Department Site
CLAS170
Ancient Myths and Modern Lives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Cross-listed with: RELS170.
Credit only granted for: CLAS170 or RELS170.
Additional information: This course cannot be taken for language credit.
What are myths and why do we tell them? What powers do myths have? We will tackle these questions by looking at the enduring and fascinating myths from ancient Greece and Rome. In addition to studying how they shaped ancient societies, we will also look at their modern influence and reflect upon the power that myths still hold in our contemporary world. Taught in English.
CLAS276
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: CLAS276 or CLAS289A.
Formerly: CLAS289A.
America, from its very origins as an independent nation, saw itself as the new Rome: its system of government is built on Roman precedents, its national buildings look as if they came from the Roman Forum, and its leisure activities take us to stadiums modeled on the Colosseum. America's relationship to Rome, however, raises its greatest anxiety: will America fall as Rome did? In 1776, the year of American independence, Edward Gibbon published his History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire; America has been thinking about the trajectory of its history alongside Rome's from the very beginning.
COMM
Communication Department Site
COMM324
Communication and Gender
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Explores how communication shapes constructions of gender, sex, sexuality and other identity markers. Topics include issues of oppression, identity, and power and social, political, and economic situations and examines how these issues impact our daily lives.
ENEE
Electrical & Computer Engineering Department Site
ENEE200
Technology and Consequences: Engineering, Ethics, and Humanity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENEE200 or ENES200.
What makes a technology socially responsible? At UMD, the Fearless Ideas campaign asks us to aim our enthusiasm for technology at big real problems. At the same time, we are coming to appreciate the increasingly complex nature of technological systems as they become integrated into all forms of infrastructure, we realize they may be unpredictable, interdependent on social and biological systems, and have unintended consequences. In this midst of this complexity, people make decisions with far reaching impacts. How then do we follow our passion for technology and innovation but also stay skeptical in a way that allows us to consider the potential and shortcomings of technology? Designed for both engineering and non-engineering students wishing to explore and assess the impact of engineering technology on society and the role of society in generating that technology.
ENES
Engineering Science
ENES200
Technology and Consequences: Engineering, Ethics and Humanity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENEE200 or ENES200.
What makes a technology socially responsible? At UMD, the Fearless Ideas campaign asks us to aim our enthusiasm for technology at big real problems. At the same time, we are coming to appreciate the increasingly complex nature of technological systems as they become integrated into all forms of infrastructure, we realize they may be unpredictable, interdependent on social and biological systems, and have unintended consequences. In this midst of this complexity, people make decisions with far reaching impacts. How then do we follow our passion for technology and innovation but also stay skeptical in a way that allows us to consider the potential and shortcomings of technology? Designed for both engineering and non-engineering students wishing to explore and assess the impact of engineering technology on society and the role of society in generating that technology.
ENGL
English Department Site
ENGL245
Film Form and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: CINE245.
Credit only granted for: ENGL245, CINE245 or FILM245.
Formerly: FILM245.
Introduction to film as art form and how films create meaning. Basic film terminology; fundamental principles of film form, film narrative, and film history. Examination of film technique and style over past one hundred years. Social and economic functions of film within broader institutional, economic, and cultural contexts.
ENGL359F
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Film and Video
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Junior standing or higher.
Cross-listed with: LGBT327.
Credit only granted for: LGBT327 or ENGL359F.
Comparative analysis of forms, themes, and the politics of representation in film and video by and/or about LGBT people.
Also offered as LGBT327. Credit granted for LBGT327 or ENGL359F.
ENGL375
J.R.R. Tolkien: Middle-earth and Beyond
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
An in-depth look at major themes and ideas spanning Tolkien's well-known and lesser-known works across a variety of genres and styles. We will study "The Hobbit" and "The Lord of the Rings" in connection with Tolkien's back-story mythology expressed in "The Silmarillion." We will also consider film adaptations and other popular fantasy influenced by Tolkien. And we will explore lesser-known works such as "Farmer Giles of Ham," and Tolkien's essays on fairy stories and on "Beowulf.
HISP
Historic Preservation
HISP200
The Everyday and the American Environment
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Jointly offered with HISP615.
An introduction to the theories of the everyday within the context of the American built environment. Focuses primarily on the American experience of underrepresented, minority, and/or immigrant communities; both historical and contemporary. Attempts to challenge what is meant by American in describing the American everyday built environment.
HIST
History Department Site
HIST120
Islamic Civilization
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: RELS120.
Credit only granted for: HIST120 or RELS120.
Introduction to society and culture in the Middle East since the advent of Islam: as a personal and communal faith; as artistic and literary highlights of intellectual and cultural life; and as the interplay between politics and religion under the major Islamic regimes.
HIST134
Spies, Assassins, Martyrs, and Witches: Famous Trials in American History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Examination of some of the most famous trials in American history and their enduring hold on the imagination.
HIST200
Interpreting American History: Beginnings to 1877
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU
Credit only granted for: HIST156 or HIST200.
Formerly: HIST156.
The United States from colonial times to the end of the Civil War. Establishment and development of American institutions.
HIST201
Interpreting American History: From 1865 to the Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: HIST157 or HIST201.
Formerly: HIST157.
The United States from the end of the Civil War to the present. Economic, social, intellectual, and political developments. Rise of industry and emergence of the United States as a world power.
INST
Information Studies
INST104
Design Across Campus
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
What is design, who does it, and how is it done? There is no one answer to this question--it depends on who you ask. The answers to these questions vary across disciplines and across the University campus. This course, designed with modules from contributors in UMD programs including Information Studies, Human-Computer Interaction, Graphic Design, Immersive Media Arts, Journalism, Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Engineering, and Policy, will introduce students to the goals and values, approaches, skills, and practices of diverse fields of design. It will enable students to identify grand challenges in design and serve as a sorting hat to help students find a design practice that matches their own values, approaches, skills and goals.
JOUR
Journalism Department Site
JOUR282
Beyond Facebook: How Social Media are Transforming Society, Culture, Business and Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR289F or JOUR282.
Formerly: JOUR289F.
How has social media changed the world, and how has the world changed social media? This course explores how social media has influenced relationships, culture, industry, politics, and the information environment, as well as how significant global events and technological advancements have contributed to the evolution of social media. This course gives students a broad contextual understanding of social media that they may apply in their daily lives as well as future academic inquiry.
LARC
Landscape Architecture Department Site
LARC160
Introduction to Landscape Architecture and Environmental Design
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
History, theory, philosophy and current practice of the profession of landscape architecture. Explores the interactive relationship between humans and their environment by examining people's perceptions of and changing attitude towards the landscape, as well as, an examination of how these are related to ecological and cultural influences. Topics include urban, ecological, community and creative design.
LGBT
Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Studies
LGBT327
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Film and Video
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Junior standing or higher.
Cross-listed with: ENGL359F.
Credit only granted for: LGBT327 or ENGL359F.
Comparative analysis of forms, themes, and the politics of representation in film and video by and/or about LGBT people.
Also offered as ENGL359F. Credit granted for LBGT327 or ENGL359F.
MUSC
School of Music Department Site
MUSC204
Popular Music in Black America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Traces black popular music in the U.S. with a special focus on spirituals, ragtime, the blues, early jazz, R&B, Motown, funk, soul, and rap. Examines how these styles have been borrowed by the American music industry.
MUSC205
History of Popular Music, 1950-Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
A historical survey of rock music (blues, rock, soul, metal, rap, etc.) from circa 1950 to the present, with emphasis on popular music as music and popular music as social history.
PHIL
Philosophy Department Site
PHIL100
Introduction to Philosophy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
An introduction to the literature, problems, and methods of philosophy either through a study of some of the main figures in philosophic thought or through an examination of some of the central and recurring problems of philosophy.
An introduction to philosophy that focuses on three central themes in Western philosophy: the nature of death and the possibility of an afterlife (e.g. would immortality in paradise be desirable?), the nature of minds and artificial intelligence (e.g. is the rise of artificial intelligence an existential threat to humankind?), and finally, the ethics of life and death (e.g. is it wrong to have children?)
PHIL140
Contemporary Moral Issues
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
The uses of philosophical analysis in thinking clearly about such widely debated moral issues as abortion, euthanasia, homosexuality, pornography, reverse discrimination, the death penalty, business ethics, sexual equality, and economic justice.
An introduction to the tools and concepts of ethics (and ethical argumentation) through a survey of three topics of current relevance: (i) our relation to the environment; (ii) communities and migration; (iii) technology and privacy.
PHIL203
The Rights and Wrongs of Killing People
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PHIL209J or PHIL203.
Formerly: PHIL209J.
Virtually everyone thinks it's permissible to kill people only in special circumstances. But why is killing usually wrong? Is it ever acceptable to kill an innocent human being intentionally? This course raises these and related questions and examines cases such as terrorism, suicide, abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, war. Except for a brief discussion of animals, all the controversies considered deal with killing and causing death to human beings.
PHIL204
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PHIL209E or PHIL204.
Formerly: PHIL209E.
What does the discipline of philosophy teach us about happiness? This course explores how philosophers have addressed questions about the nature of happiness and its role in the good human life. Questions to be addressed include: what is it to be happy? What social, economic, and political institutions foster and support human happiness? Can an immoral person be happy? And is a happy life the same as a meaningful life?
PHIL209T
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Do moments cease to exist when they recede into the past? Does time actually pass, or is it just a psychological illusion? Using time travelas our central example, we'll examine these questions through the lens of philosophy, science fiction, and physics
PHIL245
Political and Social Philosophy I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
A critical examination of such classical political theories as those of Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, Marx, and such contemporary theories as those of Hayek, Rawls, and recent Marxist thinkers.
SPAN
Spanish Department Site
SPAN207
Reading and Writing in Spanish
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: Must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in SPAN204; or must have appropriate World Language Placement Test (WLPT) score.
Selected readings with emphasis on reading comprehension and the development of reading strategies. Work in composition writing and a review of selected grammatical topics. Complements material of SPAN204.
SPAN303
Approaches to Cultural Materials in the Hispanic World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: SPAN301.
Recommended: May elect to take SPAN311 and/or SPAN316 in same semester as SPAN303.
Development of proficiency in critical thought through the reading, viewing, and analytical discussion of major genres and styles of cultural materials selected from Spanish-speaking world. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN363
Latin American Literatures and Cultures III: From Modernism to Neo-Liberalism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Prerequisite: SPAN303; and (SPAN311 or SPAN316).
An overview of cultural and literary production of Latin America from the late 19th through the early 21st centuries, exploring the production of literary texts in their socio-historical, political, and cultural contexts and development. Taught in Spanish.
THET
Theatre Department Site
THET110
Introduction to the Theatre
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
In the age of pop music and blockbuster films, of memes and viral videos, we often forget that theatre was one of the original forms of popular entertainment. We will focus on theatre practitioners including actors, directors, designers and backstage personnel to understand how theatre is produced. We will also consider popular entertainment in Europe and America, with a particular focus on musical theatre and Broadway to explore how theatre communicates, resonates, and remains relevant to all audiences.
THET251
Broadway Mashup: Remixing America Through Musical Theater
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Interrogate musical theater's political history, investigating how this uniquely American genre uses narrative, song, and dance to weave critical differences across race, ethnicity, immigration status, religion, gender, sexuality, and ability into our national fabric.
WGSS
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
WGSS105
Introduction to Disability Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
This course will introduce students to theories of disability justice as they intersect with feminist and antiracist struggles. Tracing the emergence of the concept of disability alongside the rise of racial knowledge since the 19th century, we will consider how disability activists have responded to ableism by developing art, political strategies, and subcultures that promote a more just society built for a wider variety of human bodies. Students will learn about the moral, medical, social, and ecological models of disability; explore varied disability experiences relating to mental illness, chronic disease, and sensory and mobility impairments; debate ethical questions concerning eugenics, selective abortion, health care access, and medical technologies; and analyze the work of disabled artists and activists of color. Students will also discuss principles of universal design which seek to make classrooms more just and collaborative. In order to balance accessibility and community building, the course has been designed for synchronous online instruction complemented by optional in-person sessions.
Cross-listed with: AMST298D. Credit only granted for: WGSS105 or AMST298D.