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Courses - Summer 2024
AASP
African American Studies Department Site
Open Seats as of
06/12/2024 at 04:30 PM
AASP100
Introduction to African American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Significant aspects of the history of African Americans with particular emphasis on the evolution and development of black communities from slavery to the present. Interdisciplinary introduction to social, political, legal and economic roots of contemporary problems faced by blacks in the United States with applications to the lives of other racial and ethnic minorities in the Americas and in other societies.
AASP187
The New Jim Crow: African-Americans, Mass Incarceration and the Prison Industrial Complex
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Recommended: AASP100.
Students will examine the birth of the racial caste system following the abolition of slavery, the parallels between the racial hierarchy of the Jim Crow system and contemporary mass incarceration, and the rise of the prison industrial complex as a multi-billon business which thrives on the oppression of low-income populations and poor communities of color.
AASP211
Get Out: The Sunken Place of Race Relations in the Post-Racial Era
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: AASP298G or AASP211.
Formerly: AASP298G.
Prevailing thought suggests that we live in an era that is post-racial, particularly after the election of Barack Obama. Media often serves to drive our assessment of where our nation stands on issues like race, gender and sexuality. This course uses the film Get Out to delve into the production, evolution and significance of race in present day America. The course will engage multiple forms of media to investigate life in "Post-Racial" America, including but not limited to the role of stereotypes, interracial relationships, police-community relations, etc.
AASP230
Social (In)Justice and African-American Health and Well-Being
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
African Americans suffer worse outcomes than non-Hispanic whites on nearly every health measure and outcomes that link to overall well-being like depressive symptoms or homicides. Health disparities are experienced by other underrepresented minority groups, but because of the unique historic and current experiences of African Americans, the determinants and solutions to African American health disparities are unique. The premise of this course is that African American health disparities are due to social injustices perpetuated on the institutional level that have permeated the lived experiences of African Americans leading to racial disparities in health and well-being. As such, the solutions on the both policy, and community, level must have a social justice approach.
AAST
Asian American Studies Department Site
AAST351
Asian Americans and Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Credit only granted for: AAST351, AAST398M or AAST398N.
Formerly: AAST398M, AAST398N.
From yellow peril invaders to model minority allies, Asian Americans have crafted their own dynamic cultural expressions in a number of media from film, television, and music to fashion, sports, and food that reveal and contest the contradictions of the U.S. nation-state. Asian American culture also uniquely sits at the nexus of immigration flows and digital technologies, providing a transnational lens to view the US place in the world. This advanced course, then, will introduce students to the study and practice of Asian American cyktyre as multiple , hybrid, and heterogeneous. It will do so through three sections: section one will introduce students to classical, cultural, and media concepts as well as relevant keywords outlined by Asian American Studies scholars; section two will review the work of Asian American cultural theorists; section three will focus on analyses of particular Asian American cultural productions. In doing so, students will gain an understanding of the shifting and interlocking tensions among the local, the national, and the global that form the cultural geographies of Asian America.
AAST355
Asian Americans in Film
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AMST328W.
Credit only granted for: AAST355, AAST398L or AMST328W.
Formerly: 398L.
Explores how Asian Americans have historically been represented in the U.S. by Hollywood, and in turn, how independent and Hollywood Asian American filmmakers have represented themselves. It covers the history of racial, gendered, and sexualized representations of Asian Americans in Hollywood, as well as Asian American filmic responses within and outside Hollywood. It also introduces how four basic tools of film analysis mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing and sound work together to create meaning in moving images. It examines how these elements are put together in three different types of films by Asian American filmmakers: narrative, documentary, and experimental. How films function in society to circulate ideas that reproduce and challenge stereotypes about Asian Americans.
AMST
American Studies Department Site
AMST101
Introduction American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: AMST101 or AMST201.
Formerly: AMST201.
Introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of American Studies by examining concepts such as culture, identity, cultural practices, and globalization, as well as theories underlying these concepts. Engages key themes, especially constructions of difference and identity, cultures of everyday life, and America and the world.
AMST203
Popular Culture in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
An introduction to American popular culture, its historical development, and its role as a reflection of and influence on our culture and society.
AMST290
Shifting Sands: Constructing Cultural Mainstreams and Margins in the U.S.
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: AMST289A or AMST290.
Formerly: AMST289A.
Examines the construction, operation, and meaning of cultural mainstreams and margins in a range of contexts, spaces, and times in the U.S. Using a variety of primary sources, research methods, and interdisciplinary scholarship, we will explore how Americans make and assign meaning to cultural mainstreams and margins. We will examine how and why cultural margins and mainstreams shift over time and what their consequences have been for social policies, laws, power relations, and national identity.
ANTH
Anthropology Department Site
ANTH222
Introduction to Ecological and Evolutionary Anthropology
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, DVUP
Credit only granted for: ANTH220 or ANTH222.
An introduction to the evolution of human physiology and human behavior, the relationship between hominid and non-hominid primates, and the study of relationships between a population of humans and their biophysical environment.
ANTH222 is a 4-credit lab course. Students should expect to spend approximately 45 hours for the asynchronous lecture and discussion portion of the course in addition to the 30 synchronous lab hours.
ANTH240
Introduction to Archaeology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Exploration of the variety of past human societies and cultures through archaeology, from the emergence of anatomically modern humans to the more recent historical past.
ANTH263
Sexuality and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: ANTH298K or ANTH263.
Formerly: ANTH298K.
An overview of sexuality from an anthropological perspective, looking at aspects of sexuality within our own culture and in cultures around the world. Course topics include the biology and culture of sex, gender, physical attraction, sexual orientation, marriage and mating taboos, fertility control, sexually transmitted diseases, and commercial aspects of sex.
ANTH265
Anthropology of Global Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
An overview of the growing field of global health including health care systems, medical practices, ideas about illness in cross-cultural contexts, issues of health development, global health inequity, and human rights issues. The course will focus on the history of global health, the critique of major international health agencies and their development paradigms, and the political economy of social inequalities and health.
ANTH357
Approaches to Sustainable Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: ANTH298E or ANTH357.
Formerly: ANTH298E.
An overview of the history of sustainable development, major development and environmental theories, and development strategies as they relate to an anthropological concern for an integrated, holistic, comparative, and humane approach to sustainable development.
AREC
Agricultural and Resource Economics Department Site
AREC365
World Hunger, Population, and Food Supplies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
An introduction to the problem of world hunger and possible solutions to it. World demand, supply, and distribution of food. Alternatives for leveling off world food demand, increasing the supply of food, and improving its distribution. Environmental limitations to increasing world food production.
ARTH
Art History & Archaeology Department Site
ARTH200
Art and Society in Ancient and Medieval Europe and the Mediterranean
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Examines the material culture and visual expressions of Mediterranean and European societies from early times until ca. 1300 CE, emphasizing the political, social, and religious context of the works studied, the relationships of the works to the societies that created them, and the interrelationship of these societies.
ARTH201
Art and Society in the West from the Renaissance to the Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Examines representative European and American works of art from the later Middle Ages to the present, highlighting the dynamic exchange between artistic and cultural traditions both within periods and across time.
CHSE
Counseling, Higher Education, and Special Education
CHSE205
Disability: From Stigma and Sideshow to Mainstream and Main Street
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: EDSP289I or CHSE205.
Formerly: EDSP289I.
Explores the cultural, historical, educational, and medical roots of difference among human beings and examines the impact of cultural and technological changes on individuals traditionally identified as disabled. The course is designed to develop a broad understanding of the concept of "disability" and the emerging technologies that shape contemporary understanding of this phenomenon and the lives of those considered disabled.
COMM
Communication Department Site
COMM324
Communication and Gender
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Explores how communication shapes constructions of gender, sex, sexuality and other identity markers. Topics include issues of oppression, identity, and power and social, political, and economic situations and examines how these issues impact our daily lives.
EDHD
Education, Human Development Department Site
EDHD230
Human Development and Societal Institutions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Development of the individual in the context of relationships with the formal and informal institutions of society. An examination of various aspects of development from the broad perspective of the social sciences.
EDSP
Education, Special Department Site
EDSP210
Introduction to Special Education
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Restriction: Sophomore standing or lower.
Credit only granted for: EDSP210, EDSP211 or EDSP470.
Students examine historical foundations of special education, including legislation; review components necessary for effective service delivery; and develop an understanding of the role of collaboration and consultation with parents, school personnel and other professionals.
EDSP470
Introduction to Special Education
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Restriction: Must not have completed EDSP210.
Credit only granted for: EDSP210, EDSP211 or EDSP470.
Designed to give an understanding of the needs of all types of exceptional children.
Open to all students except undergraduate special education majors
ENGL
English Department Site
ENGL359F
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Film and Video
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Junior standing or higher.
Cross-listed with: LGBT327.
Credit only granted for: LGBT327 or ENGL359F.
Comparative analysis of forms, themes, and the politics of representation in film and video by and/or about LGBT people.
Also offered as LGBT327. Credit granted for LBGT327 or ENGL359F.
FMSC
Family Science Department Site
FMSC330
Family Health: Health Happens in Families
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Restriction: Junior standing or higher.
The objective of this gateway course is to help you understand and apply basic theories and empirical data on family health. The course is designed to provide you with skills to think critically about theories including: Life Course Theory, the Bio-Ecological and Social-Ecological Models, and Systems Theory. We will ask questions about the distinct qualities and intersections of contexts and characteristics that impact the functioning of families. We will apply theory and research to topical issues in family health that are impacted by social structures such as conflict, crisis, migration, incarceration and inequalities.
FMSC460
Violence in Families
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Prerequisite: SOCY100, SOCY105, or PSYC100.
Credit only granted for: FMSC460 or FMST460.
Formerly: FMST460.
Theories of child, spouse, and elder abuse in the family setting. Emphasis on historical, psychological, sociological and legal trends relating to physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. Introduction to methods for prevention and remediation.
GEOG
Geographical Sciences Department Site
GEOG110
The World Today: Global Perspectives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
The most critical issue facing the world today is the sustainability of both human and physical systems in the 21st century. This class uses the context of regions of the world to explore the 21st century issues of climate change, development, politics, economy, and demography. Each region will be used to highlight aspects of sustainability.
GEOG330
As the World Turns: Society and Sustainability in a Time of Great Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: GEOG330, GEOG360, or GEOG362.
Formerly: GEOG362.
Cultural geography course on society and sustainability. Culture is the basic building block that is key to sustainability of societies. Course will cover sustainability of societies on different scales, examining local, regional, and worldwide issues. Sustainability will be examined as a key element of environmental sustainability. How societies adjust to rapid world change will be examined as a positive and/or negative factor in sustainability.
GVPT
Government and Politics Department Site
GVPT200
International Political Relations
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
A study of the major factors underlying international relations, the causes of conflict and cooperation among international actors, the role of international institutions, the interactions of domestic and foreign policies, and major issues in security, economy and the environment.
GVPT282
The Politics of Global Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
A study of the domestic governmental institutions; processes and problems such as conflict and economic development; and the socio-economic environments that are common to lower-income countries around the world.
HISP
Historic Preservation
HISP200
The Everyday and the American Environment
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Jointly offered with HISP615.
An introduction to the theories of the everyday within the context of the American built environment. Focuses primarily on the American experience of underrepresented, minority, and/or immigrant communities; both historical and contemporary. Attempts to challenge what is meant by American in describing the American everyday built environment.
HIST
History Department Site
HIST201
Interpreting American History: From 1865 to the Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: HIST157 or HIST201.
Formerly: HIST157.
The United States from the end of the Civil War to the present. Economic, social, intellectual, and political developments. Rise of industry and emergence of the United States as a world power.
HLTH
HLTH402
Disability is Not an Outcome: An Introduction to Understanding Disability
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
With an intent to disrupt traditional understandings of disability as a health outcome to be prevented, this course will introduce students to disability as an identity, a community, a population of interest to public health professionals. To change this understanding students will explore historical representations of disability, ableism, and lived experiences of people with disabilities. Disability is a multi-layered concept that broadly describes a wide range of people. Although geared toward public health scholars, the mix of readings, discussions, and assignments will help students reflect and integrate learning into their own fields of study. The course examines factors that led to systemic oppression, and methods and strategies of moving toward a more inclusive society.
IMMR
Immigration Studies
IMMR200
Introduction to Immigration and Migration Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Introduces concepts and theoretical interpretations about the causes of international migration; provides an historical overview of the main flows of immigration to the U.S.; analyzes economic, political, social, and cultural aspects that impact the immigrants' settlement process.
JOUR
Journalism Department Site
JOUR175
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Additional information: Not applicable toward journalism major.
An analysis of the information, values and underlying messages conveyed via television, newspapers, the internet, magazines, radio and film. Examines the accuracy of those messages and explores how media shape views of politics, culture and society.
This is a completely online course with both synchronous and asynchronous elements. Students are required to login at the time specified for the discussion section but additional work outside of this time is required as well.
KNES
Kinesiology Department Site
KNES287
Sport and American Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Recommended: Minimum grade of C- in KNES285.
Sport will be related to such social problems as delinquency, segregation, collective behavior, and leisure; to social processes such as socialization, stratification, mobility, and social control; and to those familiar social institutions the family, the school, the church, the military, the economy, the polity, and the mass media.
KNES334
Adapted Physical Activity: Empowering People with Disabilities to Lead a Healthy and Active Lifestyle
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP
Prerequisite: KNES370; or students not in the Kinesiology major may contact the instructor for permission.
Restriction: Must have earned a minimum of 105 credits.
Study of the field of adapted physical activity and its impact on the health and wellness of individuals with disabilities. Students will design an adapted physical activity program proposal and develop the skills needed to empower people with disabilities to participate in physical activity and sports programs. Students will explore their own perceptions towards disability and how people with disabilities are portrayed in our society. They will study the etiology of disabling conditions and the implications for participating in physical activity.
For the Summer Session, major restrictions do not apply. Students who have completed a minimum of 75 credits may register.
LARC
Landscape Architecture Department Site
LARC162
Environmental Justice: Same World, Different Built Environment
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Environmental Justice will be explored in the context of the built environment. What unequal public built environmental threats exist? How can these threats be prevented or eliminated? Public schools, public parks, access to clean water, air pollution, tree coverage are among the built environments examined in the course.
LGBT
Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Studies
LGBT327
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Film and Video
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Junior standing or higher.
Cross-listed with: ENGL359F.
Credit only granted for: LGBT327 or ENGL359F.
Comparative analysis of forms, themes, and the politics of representation in film and video by and/or about LGBT people.
Also offered as ENGL359F. Credit granted for LBGT327 or ENGL359F.
MUSC
School of Music Department Site
MUSC204
Popular Music in Black America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Traces black popular music in the U.S. with a special focus on spirituals, ragtime, the blues, early jazz, R&B, Motown, funk, soul, and rap. Examines how these styles have been borrowed by the American music industry.
MUSC205
History of Popular Music, 1950-Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
A historical survey of rock music (blues, rock, soul, metal, rap, etc.) from circa 1950 to the present, with emphasis on popular music as music and popular music as social history.
PHIL
Philosophy Department Site
PHIL344
Philosophy of Race
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Credit only granted for: PHIL344 or PHIL308Y.
Formerly: PHIL308Y.
A survey of philosophical arguments involving race and racism. Guiding questions will include: How have philosophers and scientists conceived of the concept of race? Is race a coherent concept? Does it help us explain differences in performance and behavior? What makes racism, racial prejudice, and discrimination wrong? What is the point of equality? Do we owe reparations to victims of racism?
PHSC
Public Health Science
PHSC450
Addressing Social and Structural Inequities Through Public Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MIEH300; and 1 course with a minimum grade of C- from either SPHL100 or PHSC300.
A focus on addressing social and structural inequities within race, gender, disability, and class through various perspectives in the field of public health. Students explore the causes, challenges, consequences, and extent these injustices have on health disparities from local, national, and global perspectives. Students view these inequities through the lens of the affected populations, and work interactively and collaboratively to interpret, design, and evaluate public health interventions and approaches to address key health disparities within specific communities. The aim of this course is to help students define appropriate research and address structural inequities with innovative approaches through the professional practice of public health.
SPAN
Spanish Department Site
SPAN363
Latin American Literatures and Cultures III: From Modernism to Neo-Liberalism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Prerequisite: SPAN303; and (SPAN311 or SPAN316).
An overview of cultural and literary production of Latin America from the late 19th through the early 21st centuries, exploring the production of literary texts in their socio-historical, political, and cultural contexts and development. Taught in Spanish.
THET
Theatre Department Site
THET251
Broadway Mashup: Remixing America Through Musical Theater
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Interrogate musical theater's political history, investigating how this uniquely American genre uses narrative, song, and dance to weave critical differences across race, ethnicity, immigration status, religion, gender, sexuality, and ability into our national fabric.
TLPL
Teaching and Learning, Policy and Leadership Department Site
TLPL453
Life in Two Languages: Understanding Bilingual Communities and Individuals
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Overview of society and individual multilingualism. Topics include diglossia, language shift, codeswitching, bilingual first language acquisition, language attrition, dual language education policy and practice.
WGSS
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
WGSS105
Introduction to Disability Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
This course will introduce students to theories of disability justice as they intersect with feminist and antiracist struggles. Tracing the emergence of the concept of disability alongside the rise of racial knowledge since the 19th century, we will consider how disability activists have responded to ableism by developing art, political strategies, and subcultures that promote a more just society built for a wider variety of human bodies. Students will learn about the moral, medical, social, and ecological models of disability; explore varied disability experiences relating to mental illness, chronic disease, and sensory and mobility impairments; debate ethical questions concerning eugenics, selective abortion, health care access, and medical technologies; and analyze the work of disabled artists and activists of color. Students will also discuss principles of universal design which seek to make classrooms more just and collaborative. In order to balance accessibility and community building, the course has been designed for synchronous online instruction complemented by optional in-person sessions.
Cross-listed with: AMST298D. Credit only granted for: WGSS105 or AMST298D.
WGSS205
Reproductive Justice: An Introduction
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Developed by feminists of color, reproductive justice frameworks offer a roadmap for economic, social, and medical justice advocacy attentive to the intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, and disability. This course reviews the historical, legal, and social bases of reproductive rights in the U.S.; discusses the history of feminist organizing for reproductive freedom; surveys critical theories of reproductive justice that go beyond abortion law to advocate for broader social transformation; and evaluates the possible futures of intersectional feminist activism after the overturning of Roe v. Wade.
Cross-listed with: AMST298J.