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Courses - Summer 2024
AASP
African American Studies Department Site
Open Seats as of
06/12/2024 at 05:30 PM
AASP187
The New Jim Crow: African-Americans, Mass Incarceration and the Prison Industrial Complex
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Recommended: AASP100.
Students will examine the birth of the racial caste system following the abolition of slavery, the parallels between the racial hierarchy of the Jim Crow system and contemporary mass incarceration, and the rise of the prison industrial complex as a multi-billon business which thrives on the oppression of low-income populations and poor communities of color.
AASP211
Get Out: The Sunken Place of Race Relations in the Post-Racial Era
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: AASP298G or AASP211.
Formerly: AASP298G.
Prevailing thought suggests that we live in an era that is post-racial, particularly after the election of Barack Obama. Media often serves to drive our assessment of where our nation stands on issues like race, gender and sexuality. This course uses the film Get Out to delve into the production, evolution and significance of race in present day America. The course will engage multiple forms of media to investigate life in "Post-Racial" America, including but not limited to the role of stereotypes, interracial relationships, police-community relations, etc.
AASP230
Social (In)Justice and African-American Health and Well-Being
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
African Americans suffer worse outcomes than non-Hispanic whites on nearly every health measure and outcomes that link to overall well-being like depressive symptoms or homicides. Health disparities are experienced by other underrepresented minority groups, but because of the unique historic and current experiences of African Americans, the determinants and solutions to African American health disparities are unique. The premise of this course is that African American health disparities are due to social injustices perpetuated on the institutional level that have permeated the lived experiences of African Americans leading to racial disparities in health and well-being. As such, the solutions on the both policy, and community, level must have a social justice approach.
AMST
American Studies Department Site
AMST290
Shifting Sands: Constructing Cultural Mainstreams and Margins in the U.S.
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: AMST289A or AMST290.
Formerly: AMST289A.
Examines the construction, operation, and meaning of cultural mainstreams and margins in a range of contexts, spaces, and times in the U.S. Using a variety of primary sources, research methods, and interdisciplinary scholarship, we will explore how Americans make and assign meaning to cultural mainstreams and margins. We will examine how and why cultural margins and mainstreams shift over time and what their consequences have been for social policies, laws, power relations, and national identity.
ANTH
Anthropology Department Site
ANTH265
Anthropology of Global Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
An overview of the growing field of global health including health care systems, medical practices, ideas about illness in cross-cultural contexts, issues of health development, global health inequity, and human rights issues. The course will focus on the history of global health, the critique of major international health agencies and their development paradigms, and the political economy of social inequalities and health.
ANTH266
Changing Climate, Changing Cultures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Explore past, present, and future interactions between humans and climate. Discussions, methods-oriented activities, and case study analyses provide students a foundation for appreciating the role of anthropology in understanding, responding to, and preparing for climate change.
ANTH323
Plagues, Pathogens and Public Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ANTH429A or ANTH323.
Formerly: ANTH429A.
The impact of diseases on populations from prehistoric times through the present will be examined, along with public perceptions of disease, scientific breakthroughs on treatment and prevention, and the ways that politics and public health policies can enhance or impede the advancement of disease treatment. The natural history of disease, population structure, and immunity will be discussed. The class will address emerging and re-emerging diseases and the ways that first responders, researchers, and policy makers may affect the outcome of an outbreak.
AOSC
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science
AOSC123
Causes and Consequences of Global Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Cross-listed with: GEOL123.
Credit only granted for: AOSC123, GEOG123, or GEOL123.
Study of the major components of Earth's climate system and climate change history. Discussion of 21st century climate change prediction, mitigation and adaptation efforts.
AOSC200
Weather and Climate
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with AOSC201) or DSNS, SCIS
Prerequisite: MATH107, MATH110, or MATH115.
Recommended: Concurrent enrollment in AOSC201.
What are weather and climate? Most people think they know but if you ask people to explain the differences and similarities you're bound to get a range of answers. Weather affects not just our daily activities but other important aspects of society such as transportation, commerce, security and agriculture. Most people understand what weather is to some extent. Climate and climate change are concepts that evoke strong emotional responses from people but are less well understood. In this class, students examine fundamental issues such as the greenhouse effect, severe weather, and global weather patterns and how they relate to a changing climate. Instruction in the lectures will provide the basic knowledge needed to understand these issues. In the discussion sections, students will be divided into groups to address the implications of these topics through group projects.
BMGT
Business and Management Department Site
BMGT262
The Enterprising Leader
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Designed to help students develop their leadership skills in order to identify their personal and professional purpose with an entrepreneurial mindset, and create strategies that will help them develop their abilities and achieve their aspirations by collaborating within teams and organizations. Students will apply insights from recent scholarship in entrepreneurship, leadership and strategic management to themselves in order to identify solutions to problems they find meaningful to solve in their own world. This self-discovery course will introduce students to the "CEO of ME, Inc." framework and tools such as the strategic initiatives matrix and business model canvas that they can use to help guide the choices that lie ahead, and develop collaborative, win-win relationships. In doing so, students will learn how to unlock the value of business in society and develop entrepreneurial and leadership skills that enable personal happiness and upward mobility.
This course is part of Terp Young Scholars a program designed for high school students. Enrollment for undergraduate students by permission only (email tys@umd.edu).
BMGT289I
Why Good Managers Make Bad Decisions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
This course provides an overview of the concepts, approaches, and vocabulary of evidence-based management (EBM) and provides an understanding of how experts in many disciplines can employ evidenced based decision making. EBM is an emerging movement in business to explicitly use the current best information in management decision making with special emphasis on relevant scientific findings and unbiased organizational facts. The course stresses how individuals practicing EBM learn how to rethink their approaches to data and knowledge in order to make more effective decisions.
BSCI
Biological Sciences Program Department Site
BSCI135
Amazing Green: Plants that Transformed the World
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, SCIS
In what profound ways have plants changed humanity and the world we live in today? An interactive way to learn about plants and science, focusing on how plants have changed human history, the biology of their growth, and the science behind their use.
BSCI223
General Microbiology
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, SCIS
Prerequisite: BSCI170 and BSCI171; or BSCI105.
Credit only granted for: BSCI223 or BSCI283.
How have microorganisms exploited every conceivable ecological niche, and how have humans harnessed this diversity to improve medicine, agriculture, and biotechnology? The course covers fundamental concepts in morphology, physiology, genetics, immunology, ecology, and pathogenic microbiology. Applications of microbiology to medicine, the food industry, and biotechnology.
Students must pay a $40.00 laboratory materials fee.
CCJS
Criminology and Criminal Justice Department Site
CCJS225
Responses to Violence
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
What are the dimensions of violence in the United States and worldwide, and how has humanity responded to violence? Conflict is unfortunately resolved through violence in a number of settings. It ranges from interpersonal to international in its scope. This course investigates the strengths and weaknesses of a number of resolutions to reducing violence over the course of history using both state centered and informal control.
CCJS325
Slavery in the Twenty First Century: Combating Human Trafficking
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
What is human trafficking and how do we stop it? An introduction to the trafficking of human beings in its historical, legal, economic, political and social contexts. Scope of the global problem, different forms of human trafficking, and regional trends and practices. Roles of government, the international community and individual actors. Strategies to combat trafficking.
CHSE
Counseling, Higher Education, and Special Education
CHSE205
Disability: From Stigma and Sideshow to Mainstream and Main Street
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: EDSP289I or CHSE205.
Formerly: EDSP289I.
Explores the cultural, historical, educational, and medical roots of difference among human beings and examines the impact of cultural and technological changes on individuals traditionally identified as disabled. The course is designed to develop a broad understanding of the concept of "disability" and the emerging technologies that shape contemporary understanding of this phenomenon and the lives of those considered disabled.
CLAS
Classics Department Site
CLAS170
Ancient Myths and Modern Lives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Cross-listed with: RELS170.
Credit only granted for: CLAS170 or RELS170.
Additional information: This course cannot be taken for language credit.
What are myths and why do we tell them? What powers do myths have? We will tackle these questions by looking at the enduring and fascinating myths from ancient Greece and Rome. In addition to studying how they shaped ancient societies, we will also look at their modern influence and reflect upon the power that myths still hold in our contemporary world. Taught in English.
CLAS276
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: CLAS276 or CLAS289A.
Formerly: CLAS289A.
America, from its very origins as an independent nation, saw itself as the new Rome: its system of government is built on Roman precedents, its national buildings look as if they came from the Roman Forum, and its leisure activities take us to stadiums modeled on the Colosseum. America's relationship to Rome, however, raises its greatest anxiety: will America fall as Rome did? In 1776, the year of American independence, Edward Gibbon published his History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire; America has been thinking about the trajectory of its history alongside Rome's from the very beginning.
EDHD
Education, Human Development Department Site
EDHD231
Inside 21st Century Creativity: How Creative Ideas, Concepts, and Products are Generated
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Mechanisms of the creative mind. Psychological, social, sociological, developmental, cultural, educational, genetic and neural based roots of creativity.
EDHD310
Your Brain on Education: The Neuroscience of Learning and Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Prerequisite: PSYC100.
Investigation linking research in the brain science of learning and development, including the neural basis of academic skills, to achievement, disability, and broader applications to classroom learning. This course will focus on areas of education including language (spoken and written), conceptual change, numerical/quantitative processing, and social cognition as well as burgeoning areas of neuroscientific research in general cognitive processes such as attention, memory, and executive processing. These topics will be discussed with respect to typical and atypical development with some focus on developmental disabilities including autism, specific language impairment, reading and math impairment, and attention deficit disorders among others. This course will focus on both the theoretical perspectives and pragmatic issues of how evidence regarding brain development can or may be translated into useful or misleading information for educators, professionals, and parents/guardians of our children.
ENEE
Electrical & Computer Engineering Department Site
ENEE200
Technology and Consequences: Engineering, Ethics, and Humanity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENEE200 or ENES200.
What makes a technology socially responsible? At UMD, the Fearless Ideas campaign asks us to aim our enthusiasm for technology at big real problems. At the same time, we are coming to appreciate the increasingly complex nature of technological systems as they become integrated into all forms of infrastructure, we realize they may be unpredictable, interdependent on social and biological systems, and have unintended consequences. In this midst of this complexity, people make decisions with far reaching impacts. How then do we follow our passion for technology and innovation but also stay skeptical in a way that allows us to consider the potential and shortcomings of technology? Designed for both engineering and non-engineering students wishing to explore and assess the impact of engineering technology on society and the role of society in generating that technology.
ENES
Engineering Science
ENES200
Technology and Consequences: Engineering, Ethics and Humanity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENEE200 or ENES200.
What makes a technology socially responsible? At UMD, the Fearless Ideas campaign asks us to aim our enthusiasm for technology at big real problems. At the same time, we are coming to appreciate the increasingly complex nature of technological systems as they become integrated into all forms of infrastructure, we realize they may be unpredictable, interdependent on social and biological systems, and have unintended consequences. In this midst of this complexity, people make decisions with far reaching impacts. How then do we follow our passion for technology and innovation but also stay skeptical in a way that allows us to consider the potential and shortcomings of technology? Designed for both engineering and non-engineering students wishing to explore and assess the impact of engineering technology on society and the role of society in generating that technology.
ENES250
Why Do Things Fail?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: HONR288O or ENES250.
Formerly: HONR288O.
Why did the Silver Bridge between Ohio and West Virginia collapse on Christmas Eve, 1967? What caused the top of an Aloha Airlines flight to rupture, creating a convertible airplane? How do these kinds of massive structural damage occur, and how might we prevent them? This course will introduce students to topics of stress and strain and their importance in determining the safety and reliability of engineering structures. Some of the major structural failures worldwide will be identified and researched as to the circumstances leading up to the failures. Reasons for failures will be investigated and are expected to include engineering, social, political, ethical, and economic explanations. Other possible failures to be researched and analyzed would be the collapse of a walkway in Kansas City, the failure of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge in Washington, the collapse of a bridge on Interstate 95 in Connecticut, and the collapse of the Twin Towers in New York after 911.
FMSC
Family Science Department Site
FMSC170
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: FMSC170 or FMSC298F.
Formerly: FMSC298F.
What is a Family? Engage in examination of the current trends and controversial issues in family life, including issues of marriage, reproductive technologies, adoption, child custody, remarriage, and marital violence.
FMSC190
Man Up! Where Are The Fathers?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
An examination of changing fatherhood roles, health, and inequality in diverse families. Focus will be on masculinities and disparities among men by race and class; provider role expectations; and trauma and violence faced by men in contemporary society.
GEOG
Geographical Sciences Department Site
GEOG140
Natural Disasters: Earthquakes, Floods, and Fires
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Catastrophic Environmental Events (CCE) that are becoming more common in this time of global environmental change and it is essential that today's students be equipped with the knowledge and skills to be leaders as we, as a society, understand the upheaval that these CCEs are causing. Students will examine how CEEs shape human society and ecosystem from the interdisciplinary perspective afforded by the field of Geography. Students will use the latest geographic science concepts and techniques in exploring these events. Using satellite imagery they will gain a multi-scale perspective of the ecological and societal aspects of the events.
GEOG172
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Earth observations from space enable the mapping and monitoring of our changing planet. This survey course reviews current observational capabilities and examines scientific applications in quantifying global environmental change. Drivers and outcomes of key dynamics will be illustrated and discussed, including sea and continental ice loss, deforestation, ocean warming, urbanization, agricultural expansion and intensification, and vegetation response to climate change.
Earth observations from space enable the mapping and monitoring of our changing planet. Drivers and outcomes of key global environmental change dynamics will be illustrated and discussed, including sea and continental ice loss, deforestation, ocean warming, urbanization, agricultural expansion and intensification, and vegetation response to climate change. This introductory survey course will focus on the big question: Why are Earth observations from space critical for monitoring our changing planet? Students will gain an understanding of the capabilities offered by current Earth-observing satellite missions including how satellites view the Earth, what they can observe, and what significant problems can they solve.
GEOG330
As the World Turns: Society and Sustainability in a Time of Great Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: GEOG330, GEOG360, or GEOG362.
Formerly: GEOG362.
Cultural geography course on society and sustainability. Culture is the basic building block that is key to sustainability of societies. Course will cover sustainability of societies on different scales, examining local, regional, and worldwide issues. Sustainability will be examined as a key element of environmental sustainability. How societies adjust to rapid world change will be examined as a positive and/or negative factor in sustainability.
GEOL
Geology Department Site
GEOL123
Causes and Consequences of Global Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Cross-listed with: AOSC123.
Credit only granted for: AOSC123, GEOG123, or GEOL123.
Study of the major components of Earth's climate system and climate change history. Discussion of 21st century climate change prediction, mitigation and adaptation efforts.
GVPT
Government and Politics Department Site
GVPT206
Appetite for Change: Politics and the Globalization of Food
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: GVPT206 or GVPT289A.
Formerly: GVPT289A.
An overview of the major forces transforming the food system--political, economic, technological, environmental--and the political debates surrounding them.
HISP
Historic Preservation
HISP200
The Everyday and the American Environment
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Jointly offered with HISP615.
An introduction to the theories of the everyday within the context of the American built environment. Focuses primarily on the American experience of underrepresented, minority, and/or immigrant communities; both historical and contemporary. Attempts to challenge what is meant by American in describing the American everyday built environment.
HIST
History Department Site
HIST134
Spies, Assassins, Martyrs, and Witches: Famous Trials in American History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Examination of some of the most famous trials in American history and their enduring hold on the imagination.
HIST137
Pursuits of Happiness: Ordinary Lives in the American Revolution
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: HIST137 or HNUH218A.
Investigates the search for personal fulfillment unleashed by the American Revolution; explores the many different meanings ascribed to the notion of the "pursuit of happiness" by Americans in the early national period.
HLTH
HLTH234
Global Health Messages: Understanding Exposure & Impact
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in the Community Health program.
Using a global perspective, this course teaches students to be critical consumers of current and historical health communication interventions. It also provides students with the skills to develop media interventions that target specific and general populations. Students will discover the array of diverse media messages that influence the health and well-being of individuals and communities.
HLTH234H
(Perm Req)
Global Health Messages: Understanding Exposure & Impact
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in the Community Health program.
Using a global perspective, this course teaches students to be critical consumers of current and historical health communication interventions. It also provides students with the skills to develop media interventions that target specific and general populations. Students will discover the array of diverse media messages that influence the health and well-being of individuals and communities.
INST
Information Studies
INST104
Design Across Campus
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
What is design, who does it, and how is it done? There is no one answer to this question--it depends on who you ask. The answers to these questions vary across disciplines and across the University campus. This course, designed with modules from contributors in UMD programs including Information Studies, Human-Computer Interaction, Graphic Design, Immersive Media Arts, Journalism, Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Engineering, and Policy, will introduce students to the goals and values, approaches, skills, and practices of diverse fields of design. It will enable students to identify grand challenges in design and serve as a sorting hat to help students find a design practice that matches their own values, approaches, skills and goals.
INST204
Designing Fair Systems
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: INST208D or INST204.
Formerly: INST208D.
Reviews how specific values are built into different automated decision-making systems as an inevitable result of constructing mechanisms meant to produce specific outcomes. These values create differential outcomes for the different people enmeshed in these systems, but both these values and these systems can be changed to support different values and different outcomes. The class serves as an introduction to the emerging field of algorithmic bias that bridges the disciplines of information science, computer science, law, policy, philosophy, sociology, urban planning, and others.
JOUR
Journalism Department Site
JOUR282
Beyond Facebook: How Social Media are Transforming Society, Culture, Business and Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: JOUR289F or JOUR282.
Formerly: JOUR289F.
How has social media changed the world, and how has the world changed social media? This course explores how social media has influenced relationships, culture, industry, politics, and the information environment, as well as how significant global events and technological advancements have contributed to the evolution of social media. This course gives students a broad contextual understanding of social media that they may apply in their daily lives as well as future academic inquiry.
KNES
Kinesiology Department Site
KNES226
The Cybernetic Human
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: KNES289W OR KNES226.
Formerly: KNES289W.
Can the profound and rapid technological advances experienced in the 21st century change what it means to be human or the nature of humanity? Emergent technologies, new materials, increased computer power, engineering innovations, and groundbreaking work in the sciences of cognition and action provide myriad opportunities for repairing and enhancing the human body and brain. Examines the ethical, social, and technological implications of an increasing synergism of technology and the body in sports and the arts, at work or home, rehabilitating the body and the brain, and society at large.
LARC
Landscape Architecture Department Site
LARC151
Urban Agriculture: Designing and Assessing Edible Landscapes
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Students will examine the growing development of urban agriculture and edible landscapes. Urban agriculture has seen a recent growth and interest in cities across the globe. From Paris to New York, from Baltimore to Detroit, urban agriculture is an emerging land use to address a variety of needs. Redevelopment, food deserts, community engagement and environmental justice are just some of the issues and topics that are connected to the recent growth of urban agriculture. This course will take a critical examination of urban agriculture's contribution to the food system, its input and outputs in the urban landscape, and the planning and design of urban agriculture and edible landscapes.
LARC152
Greening Cities: Who Wins, Who Loses, and Who Cares?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: LARC152 or PLSC289I.
Formerly: PLSC289I.
"Greening Cities" can have many interpretations: improving or adding urban economic activity, realizing energy efficiency, greening urban transport systems, etc. An important component of livable and sustainable cities and metropolitan ecosystems are the plants and landscapes that are inhabited by plants. With the majority of humans now living in cities, a survey of urban ecosystem principles and an examination of design and planning strategies for plant and landscape resources in urban and metropolitan regions is critical.
LARC162
Environmental Justice: Same World, Different Built Environment
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Environmental Justice will be explored in the context of the built environment. What unequal public built environmental threats exist? How can these threats be prevented or eliminated? Public schools, public parks, access to clean water, air pollution, tree coverage are among the built environments examined in the course.
PHIL
Philosophy Department Site
PHIL203
The Rights and Wrongs of Killing People
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PHIL209J or PHIL203.
Formerly: PHIL209J.
Virtually everyone thinks it's permissible to kill people only in special circumstances. But why is killing usually wrong? Is it ever acceptable to kill an innocent human being intentionally? This course raises these and related questions and examines cases such as terrorism, suicide, abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, war. Except for a brief discussion of animals, all the controversies considered deal with killing and causing death to human beings.
PHIL204
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PHIL209E or PHIL204.
Formerly: PHIL209E.
What does the discipline of philosophy teach us about happiness? This course explores how philosophers have addressed questions about the nature of happiness and its role in the good human life. Questions to be addressed include: what is it to be happy? What social, economic, and political institutions foster and support human happiness? Can an immoral person be happy? And is a happy life the same as a meaningful life?
PHIL209T
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Do moments cease to exist when they recede into the past? Does time actually pass, or is it just a psychological illusion? Using time travelas our central example, we'll examine these questions through the lens of philosophy, science fiction, and physics
PSYC
Psychology Department Site
PSYC234
Living the Good Life: The Psychology of Happiness
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PSYC234 or PSYC289D.
Formerly: PSYC289D.
What are the secrets to living a happy life? Can happiness be found within the context of war, a depressed economy, violence and other major stressors? Are some people born happier than others? This course will teach you the scientific process that psychologists use to study happiness (and related emotional variables) and give you the opportunity to practice applying that process in a number of ways. You will learn how we (a) gather and critically evaluate research findings in the existing literature, (b) integrate those findings into coherent and testable theories, (c) design and conduct valid scientific research that tests those theories and extends our knowledge, and (d) effectively communicate our theories and findings to a wide range of audiences. The result of the process is a more accurate and objective understanding of happiness, and that is what prepares you to apply your scientific understanding to explain and influence a wide range of outcomes.
PSYC237
Psychology of Evil
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PSYC237 or PSYC289E.
Formerly: PSYC289E.
Why is there evil in the world? Are some born evil, or do social, environmental and cultural forces create evil? What makes otherwise good people do evil things? The scientific study of evil epitomizes the fundamental challenge that psychology faces in dissecting the role of biology (nature) and the social context (nurture).
THET
Theatre Department Site
THET251
Broadway Mashup: Remixing America Through Musical Theater
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Interrogate musical theater's political history, investigating how this uniquely American genre uses narrative, song, and dance to weave critical differences across race, ethnicity, immigration status, religion, gender, sexuality, and ability into our national fabric.
TLPL
Teaching and Learning, Policy and Leadership Department Site
TLPL288K
Childhood Reimagined: Learning In and Out of Schools
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: TLPL288K or TLPL210.
Formerly: TLPL288K.
Surveys innovative approaches to child education, including unschooling, homeschooling, blended instruction, place-based learning, Big Picture Learning, democratic schools, microschools, self-directed learning centers, and other alternatives to traditional schools.