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Courses - Fall 2021
ENGL
English Department Site
ENGL101
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: FSAW
Additional information: Any student who has not successfully completed this course by Fall 2017 must complete this course with a minimum grade of C- in order to fulfill the General Education Fundamental Studies Academic Writing requirement.
An introductory course in expository writing.
Students with a TWSE score below 33 must take ENGL 101A in place of ENGL101. Students for whom English is a second language should consider taking ENGL101X in place of ENGL101.
ENGL101A
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: FSAW
Additional information: Any student who has not successfully completed this course by Fall 2017 must complete this course with a minimum grade of C- in order to fulfill the General Education Fundamental Studies Academic Writing requirement.
An introductory course in expository writing.
Students should take ENGL 101A rather than ENGL 101 if their TWSE score (a subscore of the SAT verbal) is 33 or below.
ENGL101C
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: FSAW
Additional information: Any student who has not successfully completed this course by Fall 2017 must complete this course with a minimum grade of C- in order to fulfill the General Education Fundamental Studies Academic Writing requirement.
An introductory course in expository writing.
Restricted to students in the Civicus Program.
ENGL101H
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: FSAW
Additional information: Any student who has not successfully completed this course by Fall 2017 must complete this course with a minimum grade of C- in order to fulfill the General Education Fundamental Studies Academic Writing requirement.
An introductory course in expository writing.
For general honors students or students with a verbal SAT of 600 or better.
ENGL101S
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: FSAW
Additional information: Any student who has not successfully completed this course by Fall 2017 must complete this course with a minimum grade of C- in order to fulfill the General Education Fundamental Studies Academic Writing requirement.
An introductory course in expository writing.
This course is restricted to College Park Scholars.
ENGL101X
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: FSAW
Additional information: Any student who has not successfully completed this course by Fall 2017 must complete this course with a minimum grade of C- in order to fulfill the General Education Fundamental Studies Academic Writing requirement.
An introductory course in expository writing.
Limited to students for whom English is a second language. The following are indications that a student should register for English 101X: 1) an iBT TOEFL score of 100 overall, with a writing section score of at least 24; 2) an IELTS score of 7.0 overall, with a writing score of at least 7.0; 3) satisfactory completion of UMEI 005: Advanced English as a Foreign Language.
ENGL130
Race and the Cultural Politics of Blood: A Historical Perspective
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Exploration of race, as term and concept, at three different historical times and from three different perspectives, through the reading of three stories: William Shakespeare's drama Othello, Aphra Behn's novella Oroonoko, and the short story Benito Cereno by Herman Melville. Exploration of the importance of context in interpretation. Study of how a concept for rationalizing human difference appears and adapts, fuses and fades away, relocates and is repurposed. How understanding of the particular situation of the concept, its context, changes our reading of the story.
ENGL140
American Fictions: U.S. Literature, History, Politics, and Constitutional Law
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Works of American literature explored in the context of major texts and developments of U.S. history, culture, politics, and constitutional law. We begin with the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution, and survey the course of American literature and history, from 1776 to the present, in relation to defining political and constitutional issues. Readings of canonical works like "Huckleberry Finn" and "The Grapes of Wrath" coupled with special attention to minority authors and issues, and horizons of constitutional contemplation opened up by minority, immigrant, and women's voices and experiences. Key historical and political issues include human rights; equal protection; religious tolerance; democratic principles; republican structures of government; independence; revolution; slavery; removal; immigration; free speech; labor rights; civil rights; feminism; environmentalism; international law and flows of people; economic globalization; technology and digital innovation; and the role that literature and the humanities play in fostering various forms of civil society, multiculturalism, and a globally accountable citizenship.
ENGL143
Visualizing Knowledge: From Data to Images
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Explores how technology and people shape our current age of information through the various forms of visually representing information. Visualizations do not show us things that are evident--visualizations make things evident. We will thus examine the history of visualization practices, the theories of image-making that guide their production, and the current state of the art. Students will engage critically with a wide range of information visualization practices to gain an understanding of the work involved in producing them and their histories. Students will also seek out contemporary visualizations, interact with the practitioners who produce them, and produce their own visualization as a response or critique.
ENGL143C
Visualizing Knowledge: From Data to Images
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Explores how technology and people shape our current age of information through the various forms of visually representing information. Visualizations do not show us things that are evident--visualizations make things evident. We will thus examine the history of visualization practices, the theories of image-making that guide their production, and the current state of the art. Students will engage critically with a wide range of information visualization practices to gain an understanding of the work involved in producing them and their histories. Students will also seek out contemporary visualizations, interact with the practitioners who produce them, and produce their own visualization as a response or critique.
Restricted to students in Carillon Communities.
ENGL201
Inventing Western Literature: Ancient and Medieval Traditions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL
GenEd: DSHU
Wide range of texts, genres, and themes from ancient and medieval Western traditions. Study of cultural, historical, and artistic forces shaping traditions, and the influence and relevance of those traditions to life in twenty-first century.
ENGL222
American Literature: 1865 to Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL
GenEd: DSHU
Surveys American writing from the Civil War through the Cold War. Authors such as Clemens, Frost, Hurston, Bellow.
ENGL233
Introduction to Asian American Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL, D
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with AAST233.
Credit only granted for: ENGL233 or AAST233.
A survey of Asian American literatures with an emphasis on recurrent themes and historical context.
ENGL234
African-American Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL, D
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AASP298L.
Credit only granted for: ENGL234 or AASP298L.
An exploration of the stories black authors tell about themselves, their communities, and the nation as informed by time and place, gender, sexuality, and class. African American perspective themes such as art, childhood, sexuality, marriage, alienation and mortality, as well as representations of slavery, Reconstruction, racial violence and the Nadir, legalized racism and segregation, black patriotism and black ex-patriots, the optimism of integration, and the prospects of a post-racial America.
Cross-listed with AASP298L. Credit will be granted for one of the following: AASP298L or ENGL234.
ENGL235
U.S. Latinx Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
CORE: HL, D
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: AMST298Q.
Credit only granted for: ENGL235 or AMST298Q.
Examines the poetry, prose, and theater of Latinx communities in the United States from their origins in the Spanish colonization of North America to their ongoing development in the 21st century. Considers how authors use literary form to gain insight into human experience, including mortality, religious belief, gender and sexuality, war and peace, family, language use, scientific inquiry, cultural tradition, ecology, and labor. Also studies how Latinx literary traditions have shaped and been shaped by broader currents in American literature, as well as what connections exist between Latinx literature and social and artistic developments in other parts of the world, particularly Latin America and the Caribbean. Authors may include Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, Eulalia Perez, Juan Nepomuceno Seguin, Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Jose Marti, Arthur A. Schomburg, Jesus Colon, Julia de Burgos, Cesar Chavez, Ariel Dorfman, Gloria Anzaldua, Junot Diaz, and Cristina Garcia.
Additional Note: Cross-listed with AMST298Q. Credit granted for ENGL235 orAMST298Q.
ENGL243
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL
GenEd: DSHU
An exploration of arguably the most complex, profound, and ubiquitous expression of human experience. Study through close reading of significant forms and conventions of Western poetic tradition. Poetry's roots in oral and folk traditions and connections to popular song forms.
ENGL245
Film Form and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HA
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: CINE245.
Credit only granted for: ENGL245, CINE245 or FILM245.
Formerly: FILM245.
Introduction to film as art form and how films create meaning. Basic film terminology; fundamental principles of film form, film narrative, and film history. Examination of film technique and style over past one hundred years. Social and economic functions of film within broader institutional, economic, and cultural contexts.
ENGL250
Reading Women Writing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL, D
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Cross-listed with: WGSS255.
Credit only granted for: ENGL250, WMST255 or WGSS255.
Formerly: WMST255.
Explores literary and cultural expressions by women and their receptions within a range of historical periods and genres. Topics such as what does a woman need in order to write, what role does gender play in the production, consumption, and interpretation of texts, and to what extent do women comprise a distinct literary subculture. Interpretation of texts will be guided by feminist and gender theory, ways of reading that have emerged as important to literary studies over the last four decades.
ENGL254
(Perm Req)
Introduction to Humanities, Health, and Medicine
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Permission of ARHU-School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures department.
Cross-listed with: ARHU230, HIST219N, WGSS230.
Credit only granted for: ARHU230 , ENGL289C, ENGL254, ARHU298A, HIST219N, or WGSS230.
An overview of the historical, cultural, ethical, and spiritual dimensions of medicine, human health, disease, and death from the points of view of various humanistic disciplines.
ENGL255
Literature of Science and Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL
GenEd: DSHU
Examines science and technology through the lens of British and American literature, primarily between 1800 and the present. Readings from early natural and experimental philosophers of the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment. How literary works represent the ethics of science and technology; beneficial developments of science, and also heavy toll of industrialization. Writers studied may include Francis Bacon, Mary Shelley, Charles Darwin, H.G. Wells, Albert Einstein, Aldous Huxley, Richard Feynman, Philip K. Dick, Octavia Butler, Michael Frayn, and Tom Stoppard.
ENGL256
Fantasy Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
How fantasy employs alternate forms of representation, such as the fantastical, estranging, or impossible, which other genres would not allow. Through novels, short stories, graphic novels, and film, traces fantasy's roots in mythology and folklore, then explores how modern texts build upon or challenge these origins. Examination of literary strategies texts use to represent the world through speculative modes. How to distinguish fantasy from, and relate it to, other genres such as science fiction, horror, fairly tales, and magical realism. Fantasy's investment in world-building, history, tradition, and categories of identity such as race, class, and gender. How fantasy, as a genre, form, and world-view, is well-suited to our contemporary reality.
ENGL257
Children's Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Literature of the nineteenth through the twenty-first century concerned with, and written for, children and young adults. How such narratives speak to themes of changing social, religious, political, and personal identity. Through poetry, novels, graphic novels, and film, explores how children's tales encapsulate and reflect on human existence, while pushing boundaries of what constitutes "children's literature" and what exactly defines the "child." Considers questions of literary classification through investigation of political and religious issues, gender politics, animal rights, social justice, race, war, and what it means to "grow up."
ENGL262
Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL
GenEd: DSHU
Cross-listed with: JWST262, HEBR298B.
Credit only granted for: JWST262, HEBR293B, or ENGL262.
Origins of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament), with attention to literary formations, archaeology, and social-political settings. Explorations of major questions, including who wrote the Bible, and when; relationships of the biblical tradition to the mythology and religious structures of ancient Israel's near eastern neighbors; and dynamics of politics, religious leadership, and law.
ENGL265
LGBTQ+ Literatures and Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
CORE: HL, D
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have completed LGBT265.
Cross-listed with: LGBT265.
Credit only granted for: ENGL265 or LGBT265.
A study of literary and cultural expressions of queer and trans identities, positionalities, and analytics through an exploration of literature, art, and media. We will examine historical and political power relations by considering the intersections of sexuality and gender with race, class, nation, and disability. Topics include the social construction and regulation of sexuality and gender, performance and performativity, intersectionality, and the relationship between aesthetic forms and queer/ trans subjectivity. Our interpretations will be informed by queer and trans theories.
ENGL271
Writing Poems and Stories: An Introductory Workshop
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Introduction to theory and practice of writing fiction and poetry. Emphasis on critical reading of literary models. Exercises and workshop discussions with continual reference to modeling, drafting, and revising as necessary stages in a creative process.
ENGL272
Writing Fiction: A Beginning Workshop
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP
Introduction to theory and practice of writing fiction. Emphasis on critical reading of literary models. Exercises and workshop discussions with continual reference to modeling, drafting, and revising as necessary stages in a creative process.