Hide Advanced Options
Courses - Fall 2023
HNUH
University Honors
HNUH100
Credits: 1
Grad Meth: Reg
First-semester orientation and exploration seminar required of all UH students.
Restricted to first-semester UH students.
HNUH218B
Frederick Douglass's America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
What does it mean to be free in the United States? The concept of freedom was embedded in the nation's political culture in the Declaration of Independence, and it has remained a cherished and contested ideal. We can interrogate this concept through the life and times of Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), who dreamed eloquently of freedom, thought carefully about its limits, and worked ardently to build a firmer freedom for a broader population. With Douglass as our guide, we will examine the survival of slavery in a nation built on freedom, images of the expanding United States as a land of opportunity, and the complex meanings and tremendous costs of freedom struggles during the nineteenth century. This history will push you to think critically about the contested concepts that shape our lives, and to consider the values and the perils of a society that positions freedom as its highest ideal.
Restricted to University Honors students matriculating in Fall 2020 and later. HNUH218B is the required course in the Freedom at Stake thematic cluster. Freedom at Stake courses will be offered through Spring 2024.
HNUH218J
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
Free speech, free porn, free shipping... What does it mean for something to be 'free' online and how does our participation in the internet liberate or constrain our identities, bodies, and relation with others? In this class we'll talk about the economics, politics, and culture of the internet to assess how values and value are made and circulated within its technologies. We'll focus on the many ways the term 'free' operates in this context, notably, around the ability to create, distribute, and access information. Centered on the US with a comparative eye on the global internet ecosystem, this seminar asks: Where do the rights and responsibilities for a "free internet" come from, and to whom do they apply? What identities and bodies are at risk or rewarded in these systems? What are the choices individuals, platforms, and governments must make to determine the future of the internet and the freedom of the people who build and use it?
This course is part of the Freedom at Stake thematic cluster. Freedom at Stake courses will be offered through Spring 2024.
HNUH218V
Black Bodies and Green Spaces: From 1619 to Today
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC
From the antebellum plantation slave, who used uncultivated land as a place of deliverance, healing and route to freedom, to the Central Park bird watcher, whose green space presence was perceived as a threat to White physical safety, black bodies have a vexed relationship to green space. This course critically examines how systemic racism has shaped the experience, connection, and relationship to nature among Black Americans. Students will conduct in-depth analysis, critical thinking, and discussion on topics ranging from slavery and nature; The Great Migration; and Jim Crow, segregation, and parks; to green space inequity and "Moving While Black" (Treyvon to Ahmaud). While some environments (built, natural, virtual) within the United States have represented the essence of anti-Black racism and indignity, this course will further explore how many Black Americans still regarded nature as a space of freedom, humanity, and spirituality.
HNUH219T
Transform Maryland: Consulting Practicum
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS
In this experiential learning opportunity, a team of students undertakes a real-world practicum to develop consulting skills and improve an operational process at the University of Maryland. A new project is selected each semester and the course culminates in a presentation to key members of the UMD leadership team. Through concepts drawn from multiple disciplines, students learn and apply an analytical, systems approach to problem solving. Working with oversight from experts in the industry, students partner with university officials to understand and map a business process that affects students, identify opportunities for process innovation, and apply user-centered design to develop a persuasive narrative to recommend solutions and leverage the potential for technology to streamline the process. This practicum prepares students to consult for real-world change, while practicing competencies they will use in their professional internship experience the following semester (HNUH219P).
HNUH219T must be followed by HUNH219P to complete the Transform Maryland Theory/Practice track. This track will be offered at least through the 2024-25
HNUH228B
Redesigning Life: Prospects and Consequences
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
What is at stake for our world as humans seek to redesign biological organisms? Biotechnology advances are enabling us to read, edit and write genomes, including our own. This revolution has been fueled by the quest to understand and cure disease. Yet, these innovations have far-reaching consequences beyond medicine and will reshape our world in ways we can only imagine - or fear. The course will challenge students to confront the risks and rewards for them, their family, their community, and their future, as biotechnology moves out of specialized laboratories and into homes. A demystifying, low-tech approach will introduce them to contemporary genome redesign, clarifying the current limitations and future goals of the field. Students will debate whether redesigning plants and animals will enhance or inhibit momentum in human genome engineering, and formulate their own arguments about who should be able to use these tools and where, who decides, and how much society is willing to risk.
Restricted to University Honors students matriculating in Fall 2020 and later. HNUH228B is the required course in the Redesigning Life thematic cluster. Redesigning Life courses will be offered through Spring 2024.
HNUH228U
A Life Worth Living: The Legacy of Eugenics in Genetics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
Should parents be able to choose their child's eye color? Or alter their child's genome to eliminate a hereditary disability? While these might seem like different concerns, both are eugenic questions. In this class students will learn about the legacy of eugenics and its role in the development of genetics by analyzing science fiction works through the lens of disability studies. We'll explore the past to identify who has historically been considered "fit" and look to the future to consider what kinds of embodiments, and life experiences, society seems willing to let disappear.
Restricted to University Honors students matriculating in Fall 2020 and HNUH228U is part of the Redesigning Life cluster. Redesigning Life courses will be offered throgh Spring 2024.
HNUH228V
At What Cost? An Examination of the Societal and Ethical Impact of Modern Biological Research
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS
The results of modern biological research are pervasive - from cutting edge medical treatments, to debates about mandatory vaccination, to genetic engineering breakthroughs. This course will examine the social, ethical, and biological costs of research. The focus will be on the larger issues that surround the biology - questions of ethical research, the perception of science versus reality, the intersection of science and society, and even we may need to reconsider the meanings of "self" and "human". Students will reflect on the lessons learned to propose how research can proceed in a way that balances the demands of discovery with social justice and the ethical use of animals and the environment.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH228V is part of the Redesigning Life thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH248B to complete the cluster. Redesigning Life courses will be offered through Spring 2024.
HNUH229T
Climate in Crisis: Socio-Environmental Sustainability
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS
What does it mean to achieve sustainability and how does use of a socio-environmental lens help move the world in that direction? In this, the theory component of the Climate in Crisis track, students will develop an understanding of socio-environmental systems, what they have in common with other complex adaptive systems and the approaches used to study them. With a focus on why a socio-environmental systems approach can help illuminate the environmental, socio-cultural, economic, and intersectional dimensions of sustainability, we will explore what different disciplines bring to this complex topic and use qualitative and quantitative approaches to grapple with problems of sustainability. How do we work with stakeholders to identify the vulnerable, the equitable paths forward, and the trade-offs? Who are the winners and losers of policy decisions? In HNUH229P, students will complement the work of this course with hands-on engagement at the level of Federal policy and legislation.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH229T pairs with HNUH229P to complete the "Climate in Crisis" Theory/Practice track. This pair of courses can be taken in any order. This track will be offered at least through the 2023-24 academic year.
HNUH238B
Systemic Racism in Public Opinion and Policy Attitudes
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
If we believe that racism is bad, why do we still support racist policies? No matter how hard we work to end it, the challenge of racism seems here to stay. Though attitudes toward racial segregation in schools have changed, schools are more racially isolated than ever. There is a disconnect in American public life between support for the idea of equality and resistance to policies aimed at addressing racism, and a deep divide over how to eliminate inequality. This course focuses on public opinion and how these attitudes inform public policy. Can we address systemic inequality through public engagement and by changing the national narrative with the support of evidence? Does change come from shifting views or shifting policies? Students will explore these issues through a case study on racial equity in the Honors College. By developing skills in evidence-based op-ed writing and survey-based experiments, students will add their voices to these pressing public debates of our time.
Restricted to University Honors students matriculating in Fall 2020 and later. HNUH238B is the required course in the Systemic Racism cluster. Systemic Racism classes will be offered through Spring 2024.
HNUH238U
Unequal Opportunity? Race and the Future of American Education
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
America's schools are dynamic microcosms of society at large. They simultaneously reflect, reproduce, and shape what happens outside of the classroom, including the many ways that racism affects us all. The educational mechanisms that operate for the benefit of some and to the detriment of others are often hard to see, often because they are hidden in plain sight. For example, national tests are standardized. When racialized differences in test scores appear, they are called "achievement gaps" and the disparity is attributed to essential differences or cultural deficiency rather than inequitable access and opportunity. In this course students will learn methods to critically examine such commonplace notions as the achievement gap and to document their effects on society. They will also develop strategies for self-reflection that enable them to confront inequity in their own educational experience and work to create change.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH238U is part of the Systemic Racism thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH238B to complete the cluster. Systemic Racism courses will be offered through Spring 2024.
HNUH238V
Still Separate and Unequal? The Enduring Role of Segregation in American Life
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Racial segregation remains an enduring feature of American life today though many believe segregation is a relic of the past. Using an interdisciplinary approach that incorporates history, sociology, political science, and public policy, this course highlights the complex ways in which legacies of segregation continue to shape life in the US. We will identify how federal, state, and local governments endorsed systemic racism through policies that defined the racial geography and resources of racial groups in the US. Students will engage with policy experts to consider the promise and limits of policies that promote integration within communities and the connection between race, spatial location, and current political divisions.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH238V is part of the Systemic Racism thematic cluster and must be paired with HNUH238B to complete the cluster. Systemic Racism courses will be offered through Spring 2024.
HNUH239P
Geopolitics of Finance: A Simulation of the Roller Coasters of Capitalism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Credit only granted for: HONR299F or HNUH239P.
Formerly: HONR299F.
Explores the intersection of money, markets, politics, and power; and the periodic financial crises that leave a lasting, sometimes devastating impact on the global landscape. Students will examine the detritus of 200 years of crises in the United States, from 19th-century booms and busts, to early 20th-century crashes. They will take the roller coaster ride of the 2008 financial crisis, reliving events that left the world reshaped. Students will be primed to examine the ripple effects of financial crises and the role they have played in changing the global socio-economic landscape over the last two centuries. This course is self-contained but paired with HNUH239T in the Geopolitics of Finance track, which explores how globalization has brought about fundamental changes to our daily lives by making the world more interdependent.
HNUH239T
Geopolitics of Finance: Innovation & Cross-Cultural Globalization
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Introduces students to the creative possibilities of the global economy: cross-cultural innovation, collaborative design-driven solutions, and enduring innovation with global purchase. Covers innovations in global business that are transforming the future through an embrace of diverse cultural perspectives. Working with interactive idealized design, out-of-the-box-thinking, and strategic exploration tools, students will explore and experience relevant design to new and cross-cultural value creation. Through rapid prototyping, immersive reflections, and innovative design activities, students will experience how to translate insight into action, and action into tangible results. The evolutionary application of frameworks in this course culminates in a capstone project. This course is self-contained but paired with HNUH239P in the Geopolitics of Finance track, which explores how globalization has brought about fundamental changes to our daily lives by making the world more interdependent.
HNUH239T pairs with HNUH239P to complete the "Geopolitics of Finance" Theory/Practice Track. This pair of courses can be taken in any order. This track will be offered at least through the 2023-24 academic year.
HNUH248B
Setting the Table: The Challenges and Opportunities for Sustainable Agriculture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
What will the farm of the future look like? Our current food system is plagued with paradoxes. An estimated 41.2 million Americans are classified as food insecure, but we produce 4,000 calories per person per day. Between 2008 and 2012, 1.6 million acres of long-term grasslands were converted to crop production, yet more than 350,000 acres of farmland were lost to development annually. This course will investigate what determines the food we eat and how we can make changes today that will improve both food access and the environment for future generations. Students will learn agribusiness, as well as alternative food movements and regenerative agriculture. They will meet experts from the USDA and Maryland producers. By growing their own vegetables, tracking food consumption, and exploring family history linked to farming, students will leave the course as conscious consumers empowered to navigate food system reform.
Restricted to University Honors students matriculating in Fall 2020 and later.

HNUH248B is the required course in the Global Crises, Sustainable Futures cluster. Global Crises, Sustainable Futures classes will be offered through Spring 2024.
HNUH248U
The Loneliness Crisis: Origins and Solutions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
In 2017, U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy deemed loneliness an "epidemic." Despite the rise of social media that is meant to foster connection, over 23% of adults report being lonely and social networks have been shrinking for decades. Like a viral epidemic, widespread loneliness has grave consequences. Loneliness shortens lifespans at a rate akin to smoking 15 cigarettes a day and predicts mortality risk better than poor diet or lack of exercise. This course will explore how loneliness became a crisis--exploring potential drivers of loneliness like social media, systemic racism, homophobia, and the rise of romantic love--and what we can do about it. It will end with students developing interventions to diminish loneliness and practicing skills to connect with one another.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH248U is part of the Global Crises, Sustainable Futures thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH248B to complete the cluster. Global Crises, Sustainable Futures courses will be offered through Spring 2024.
HNUH249P
National Security: US Foreign Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
Credit only granted for: HNUH249P or HONR269T.
Formerly: HONR269T.
Following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the U.S. launched a major effort to dismantle the Taliban and create a sustainable democracy in Afghanistan. In 2021, the Taliban took control of the country. Was the U.S. effort doomed to fail? To answer this question, UH students will partner with peers at the American University of Afghanistan through a virtual global classroom to examine the lessons learned from the U.S. and international presence in Afghanistan over the past 20 years. Through reading assignments and virtual meetings with former senior U.S. and Afghan officials, students will examine the reasons behind the downfall of the country and analyze whether the outcome could have been changed. Students are not expected to have any prior knowledge about the conflict in Afghanistan. This course is self-contained but paired with HNUH249T in the National Security track, which explores debates around efforts to protect the nation from terrorism while preserving our values.
HNUH249P pairs with HNUH249T to complete the National Security Theory/Practice track. This pair of courses can be taken in any order. This track will be offered at least through the 2024-25 academic year.
HNUH258B
The Ecology of Childhood Poverty
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
How does poverty shape the relationship between humans and their environment? It may seem obvious that being poor in childhood has enduring effects on development. What is less obvious is how experiencing poverty in childhood shapes relationships between children and their surroundings, including family interactions, peer relationships, adult dynamics, and the health of the community. Less clear still is the extent to which positive interactions with caretakers and social supports can protect children from potential harm as they grow up. This course focuses on the complexity of poverty as a social force and community concern. Students will investigate the nature of poverty through an interdisciplinary lens that includes social theory, developmental psychology, and empirical studies. After analyzing various approaches to the study of child poverty, students will be in a position to use research on parenting and poverty to evaluate public policy and social programs in their own backyard.
HNUH258B is the required I-Series course in the Metamorphosis thematic cluster. Metamorphosis courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH258U
The Basis of Behavior: Evolution and the Origin of Actions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSNS
Why do some monkeys spend time grooming each other in large groups, while others lose their minds with rage if another monkey comes too close? Complex organisms exhibit behaviors that both fascinate and confound, and the way an animal behaves dictates how it interacts with its environment, with profound consequences. Individual behaviors can have dramatic effects on individual fitness, an individual's groupmates, and even the evolution of species. This leads to a fundamental question in behavioral evolution: why do animals do the things they do? The answer lies in the interaction between individual experiences and eons of natural selection. In this seminar, students investigate what organisms were, what they have become, and why. With a focus on the transitions in behavior that caused single cells to evolve over time into complex societies, students will apply evolutionary principles to individual development and explore how and why individuals choose certain behaviors over others.
HNUH258U is part of the Metamorphosis thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH258B to complete the cluster. Metamorphosis courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH259P
Drawn to D.C.: Sketching the City
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Must have matriculated in University Honors starting in Fall 2020 or later.
Did you draw as a child? Are you a doodler? These pastimes are more than a distraction and amusement. Sketching is a way of thinking about your environment and understanding how you inhabit space. This course invites students to experience Washington, D.C. like an architect: with their eyes and their hands. We will study the work of architects and urban designers; visit landmarks in and around D.C. and the campus; and sketch indoors and outdoors. With D.C. as our laboratory, we will draw to understand the components that make the city a city, and explore tactile meanings of buildings and public spaces. Techniques presented in the course will range from the technical to the artistic, from field measuring and freehand sketching to creating 2D and 3D architectural drawings and presenting them. No drawing experience required! This course is self-contained but paired with HNUH259T in the Drawn to D.C. track, which explores the spaces we create and inhabit, and how they inhabit us.
HUNH259P pairs with HUNH259P to complete the Drawn to D.C. Theory/Practice track. This pair of courses can be taken in any order. This track will be offered at least through the 2024-25 academic year.
HNUH268B
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
What traction does the past have in society today? This course explores globally how the past gains traction in society today and becomes remade in the present. That inquiry will be guided by the idea of heritage, as it mobilizes the past within a broad spectrum of social, political, economic, and environmental issues. We will examine western relationships to the past as intimately tied to property and the drive to plunder, collect, and catalogue. Increasingly, conceptions of heritage include landscapes, as well as intangibles such as music, dance, and folklore. This broad definition honors the diversity of present-day relations to the past, even as it strains heritage management models that are organized around definitions and regulations, and bear the weight of historical injustice. Close examination of heritage at work within global crisis and struggle prompts questions on who owns the past, and who owns up to it. What do we owe the past, and will we be good ancestors to the future?
HNUH268B is the required I-Series course in the Heritage thematic cluster. Heritage courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH268U
Power, Politics, and the Past: Local Communities and Cultural Heritage
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU
The politics of the past surround us. An online memorial to the struggle against the Dakota Pipeline, the call to commemorate Indigeneity instead of Columbus, monuments to the Confederacy torn down... How do diverse communities claim--or reject--particular places, practices, and ideas as their shared heritage, and why? In this course, we will explore these questions with reference to Indigenous communities in global context, with a particular focus on Mexico. Students will engage with theoretical approaches and contemporary case studies to analyze the politics and ethics surrounding the use of the past in diverse Indigenous presents. Visits to DC's museums and archives will help students practice theorizing real-world materials. Students will leave the course with the analytical tools necessary to understand cultural heritage and advocate for Indigenous perspectives on the past. A typical day in this course will involve reading an article-length work and participating in student-led discussion.
HNUH268U is part of the Heritage thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH268B to complete the cluster. Heritage courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH268W
Where the Waters Blend: Contemporary Indigenous Perspectives on History, Traditions, and Modern Issues
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
In this unique cultural and personal learning experience, students will explore the history, traditions, and contemporary issues faced by Maryland's Indigenous people. The experiential work of the course asks students to consider how the past matters, particularly when it is embodied in the land they live on, and their present obligations to it. On-campus and place-based learning, focused on the precolonial and colonial histories of Maryland's Indigenous people, and their contemporary issues create opportunities for students to reflect upon and interrogate their understanding of Maryland's past, present, and future. Students will emerge from this course with a greater understanding of the Maryland's Indigenous people and an increased capacity to challenge colonial and postcolonial paradigms that marginalize the Indigenous people in our region, nation, and across the globe.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH268W is part of the Heritage thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH268B to complete the cluster. Heritage courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH278A
(Perm Req)
The Research Behind Headlines on Words, Thought, and Behavior
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Cross-listed with: HESP214.
Credit only granted for: HNUH278A or HESP214.
How does the human mind use language? Type "Language Science News" into your Google search bar. Among the more than 3 billion hits, headlines like "What is love? It depends what language you speak" and "Science's English dominance hinders diversity" invite you to think about the impact of words on thought and behavior. These are stories about how humans acquire and use language, but they ultimately address big questions about how we experience knowledge itself. In a world of unprecedented access to science journalism, did you ever read a headline about human behavior and wonder: How do we know? This class takes up the elegant ways cognitive scientists design experiments to answer crucial questions about language and thought, brain and behavior, that have no intuitive answers. Students will dive deep into the media coverage of their favorite claims about what we know, debate the psychological science behind these claims, and develop transferable critical-thinking skills in the process.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 and later. This course is the required I-Series course in the "In A Word" thematic cluster. Other courses in the "In A Word" cluster will be offered through Spring 2023; and HNUH278A will be offered through Fall 2023.
HNUH278B
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
How do ordinary citizens power democracy? At the age of 18, every American citizen is endowed with the right to vote, but what if democracy demands more than voting? With democratic processes seemingly in peril all around us, what can and should ordinary citizens do to safeguard democracy? Looking beyond the basic right to vote, this class will instead explore the complex ecosystem of citizenship practices necessary for collective self-governance. Turning to both philosophy and history, the course material addresses the power and peril of such civic habits as mutual aid, economic participation, tolerance, attention, organizing, protest, and more. We consider what resources these habits require, what virtues they inspire, and what happens when they conflict with each other. Students in this course will acquire the tools to develop and act on their own answer to the pressing question of what it will take to save democracy.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

HNUH278B-0101 is the required I-Series course in the Civil Bonds thematic cluster. Civil Bonds courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH278U
Indigenous Knowledge, Supernatural Remedy, and Collective Action: Lessons from Agrarian Societies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS
How were human communities sustained before the rise of capitalism, individualism, and secularism? Where can we look to imagine a world in which modern science, polity, and ethics are not the defining system of civil social? Through an exploration of stories from late medieval Europe, China, Southeast Asia, and other regional communities, with a particular focus on the East, this course aims at de-orientalizing the narratives of the Western world by recovering the collective practices of the global past and present. Interrogating the idea that human history has been a linear process of industrialization and secularization, this course encourages students to reflect on the limits and problems of modernization, and learn from cultures whose practices were displaced or silenced by colonial knowledge production. Students will be empowered to consider, and even envision, alternative versions of modernity and the future of our world.
HNUH278U is part of the Civil Bonds thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH278B to complete the cluster. Civil Bonds courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH278V
Climate Change, Infectious Disease, and Civil Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
Viruses that are lethal to human life have been on earth for centuries. Why are they surging now? And how can we respond to the recent breakneck spread of Coronavirus? This class begins its journey with Homo sapiens, our ancestor that dispersed out of Africa and carried infectious diseases across the planet. Human expansion into new ecosystems also provided opportunities for us to acquire new pathogens. While all of human history is marked by diseases caused by human migration, the Industrial Revolution greatly accelerated human mobility while planting the seeds of the human impact on climate change. Today, the increasingly rapid movement of people and goods, combined with a warming planet and the large-scale disruption of major ecosystems has witnessed an unprecedented spread of infectious diseases. Students will explore how these trends impact our lives and collectively challenge themselves to do what must be done to save our planet and ourselves.
HNUH278V is part of the Civil Bonds thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH278B to complete the cluster. Civil Bonds courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH288B
Race, Reproduction and Rights
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Can humanity thrive without ensuring reproductive freedom? The 2022 US Supreme Court decision that the right to an abortion is unconstitutional has generated impassioned debate about women's rights and access to reproductive health care in the US and globally. This debate opens space to think beyond "pro-choice or pro-life" polarization and create conditions that promote equity, respect for rights, and a healthy society. These conditions would need to address injustices such as the racism, gender inequalities, marginalization, and colonization that produce disparities in reproductive health care and jeopardize the well-being of individuals, families, communities, and countries. Who controls the bodies of marginalized women and men? What is the meaning of reproductive rights for people who have little power? This course challenges students to bring together multiple disciplines, become critical data consumers, and develop innovative ways to use this knowledge to influence policy.
HNUH288B is the required I-Series course in the Health Matters thematic cluster. Health Matters courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH288U
The Body Knows: Creating Healthy Intimacy on College Campuses
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
How do we figure out what we physically desire? How do we know where our boundaries are and how do we communicate that to others? What would it look like to create a campus community where young people are confident about their sexuality and their ability to communicate the nuances of their needs to potential partners? This course is designed as a creative workshop to help students put their own embodied knowledge in conversation with theories and practices of healthy intimacy. Core texts explore the history of sexual violence as a tool of colonization, the relationship between feminism and sex-positivity in popular culture, and the consent theories that have become central to college campus responses to sexual violence. With the help of performance-based techniques, students will have the opportunity to research issues specific to UMD, design curricula for their peers, and advocate for an end to sexual violence on campus.
HNUH288U is part of the Health Matters thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH288B to complete the cluster. Health Matters courses will be offered through Spring 2025.
HNUH288W
Over My Dead Body: Law and the Ethics of Healthcare
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
In real time during the pandemic, we had a front-row seat to how much global healthcare can be a function not of the law but of human action. From how to prioritize populations for vaccines to individual decisions about masks, we were plunged into an almost daily discussion of the values and moral principles that guide nations and people in making choices about healthcare. This class invites students to explore their sense of right and wrong in the public healthcare debate. We will look at traditional issues such as legal paternalism, informed consent, and governmental distrust. And we will take up pressing current issues like abortion's impact on identity/privacy, disparities in marginalized communities, and biometric technologies. Students will acquire the tools to think critically think about these important issues of fairness and what our current practices reveal about society's values.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later. HNUH288W is part of the Health Matters thematic cluster and pairs with HNUH288B to complete the cluster. Health Matters courseswill be offered through through Spring 2025.
HNUH300
Vantage Point Seminar
Credits: 2
Grad Meth: Reg
Goal-setting and project-design seminar required of all UH students and taken in the second semester of the sophomore year or the first semester of the junior year.
Restricted to UH students matriculating in Fall 2020 or later.

Vantage Point is for UH students in their 4th or 5th semester who have already completed or are completing their second cluster or track for the UH Citation.
HNUH318T
(Perm Req)
Political Engagement and Advocacy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Federal Fellows Program; and permission of instructor.
Cross-listed with: FGSM310.
Credit only granted for: HNUH318T or FGSM310.
An examination of questions and issues in the practice of political engagement and advocacy. Guest lecturers drawn from political, civic engagement, and advocacy arenas will visit class and participate in discussions.
HNUH319T
(Perm Req)
Civic Leadership and Human Services
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Maryland Fellows Program; and Permission of Department.
Cross-listed with: FGSM315.
An examination of important issues, methodologies and tools of civic leadership in relation to human services, especially at the state and local level.
HNUH328T
(Perm Req)
Public Health Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Federal Fellows Program; and permission of instructor.
Cross-listed with: FGSM320.
Credit only granted for: UNIV348P, HNUH328T or FGSM320.
Formerly: UNIV348P.
An exploration of the major questions and issues facing the U.S. health care system as well as the formulation and implementation of health policy.
HNUH338T
(Perm Req)
Homeland and National Security Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Federal Fellows Program; and permission of instructor.
Cross-listed with: FGSM330.
Credit only granted for: UNIV348T, HNUH338T or FGSM330.
Formerly: UNIV348T.
An examination of the concept of U.S. homeland and national security, threats, and major vulnerabilities in the context of recent history.
HNUH348T
(Perm Req)
Energy and Environmental Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Federal Fellows Program; and permission of instructor.
Cross-listed with: FGSM340.
Credit only granted for: UNIV348E, HNUH348T or FGSM340.
Formerly: UNIV348E.
An examination of issues of energy and environmental sustainability through an investigation of policy-making in energy, climate change, and sustainable development.
HNUH358T
(Perm Req)
Critical Regions and International Relations
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Global Fellows Program; and permission of instructor.
Cross-listed with: FGSM350.
Credit only granted for: HNUH358T or FGSM350.
An examination of international relations and foreign policy challenges in critical regions.
HNUH359T
(Perm Req)
International Security and Intelligence
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Global Fellows Program; and Permission of Department.
Cross-listed with: FGSM355.
Examines the role of intelligence in supporting U.S. security strategy and policy. Students will learn how the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) is structured and organized, and will explore how intelligence is deployed to support the warfighter, diplomats, and senior-level decisionmakers. The course emphasizes the development of critical thinking and analytic skills, as well as professional writing and oral presentation abilities that are necessary for successful work in national security organizations. The course will feature guest lecturers from real-world practitioners to supplement course readings.
HNUH368T
(Perm Req)
U.S. Diplomacy and Policymaking
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Global Fellows Program; and permission of instructor.
Cross-listed with: FGSM360.
Credit only granted for: HNIUH368T or FGSM360.
An examination of questions and issues in the practice of contemporary diplomacy and policy-making. Guest lecturers drawn from Washington policy-making and foreign service communities will visit class and participate in discussion.
HNUH369T
(Perm Req)
Economic Diplomacy: Challenges and Opportunities
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Global Fellows Program; AND Permission of Department.
Cross-listed with: FGSM365.
Credit only granted for: FGSM365 or HNUH369T.
An examination of political, social, and environmental aspects of the global economy in the context of power competition and technological change.
HNUH378T
(Perm Req)
Science Diplomacy: Foreign Policy & Science, Technology, and Innovation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Global Fellows Program; and permission of instructor.
Cross-listed with: FGSM370.
Credit only granted for: UNIV389F, HNUH378T or FGSM370.
Formerly: UNIV389F.
An exploration of the critical roles scientific knowledge and technological innovation play in the formation and implementation of foreign policy issues, including energy and climate change, public health, space and innovation, and economic development.
HNUH388T
(Perm Req)
Responses to Global Challenges
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Global Fellows Program; and permission of instructor.
Cross-listed with: FGSM380.
Credit only granted for: UNIV389B, HNUH388T or FGSM380.
Formerly: UNIV389B.
An examination of global issues and responses primarily from the perspective of the practitioner. The focus will be on social, humanitarian, and human rights issues in different global contexts.
HNUH398P
(Perm Req)
Federal and Global Experiential Learning
Credits: 3 - 9
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Restriction: Permission of instructor. Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs.
Cross-listed with: FGSM398.
Credit only granted for: FGSM398 or HNUH398P.
This is the experiential course component of the Federal Fellows Program and Global Fellows Program.
HNUH398T
(Perm Req)
Global Health Challenges and Water Security
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Must be in the Global Fellows Program; and permission of instructor.
Cross-listed with: FGSM390.
Credit only granted for: HNUH398T, HONR378M, or FGSM390.
An examination of questions and issues of global health and water security. Expert practitioners will also visit class and participate in discussions.