Hide Advanced Options
Courses - Fall 2024
SOCY
Sociology Department Site
Open Seats as of
07/18/2024 at 07:30 AM
SOCY100
Introduction to Sociology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Introduces fundamental concepts and theories of sociology. Guided by C. Wright Mills' "sociological imagination," the course promotes critical thinking; challenges conventional assumptions about culture politics, history, and psychology; and equips students with theoretical approaches and research methods to analyze various sociological topics, including family, work, education, religion, social movements, and issues related to class, gender, race, and ethnic inequalities.
SOCY105
Understanding Contemporary Social Problems - Frameworks for Critical Thinking and Strategies for Solutions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Embark on an exploration of contemporary social issues and unravel the intricate ways in which these challenges are woven into the fabric of society. Develop a comprehensive understanding of societal organization and partake in a detailed study of selected social problems, with a specific emphasis on issues like social conflict and inequality. This course provides an insightful journey into the nuanced interplay between societal structure and prevalent challenges, fostering a heightened awareness of the dynamics shaping our social landscape.
SOCY200
Innovation, Exploration and the Evolution of Human Societies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
We will explore the nature of human societies through comparative, historical, and interdisciplinary perspectives. Students will delve into the core of social structures, unravel the defining components of society, and examine their organization, evolution, and impact on collective existence. Students will also explore the socio-historical forces and geopolitical dynamics that drive social change to analyze the complex connections that illuminate our shared social experience across time.
SOCY201
Introductory Statistics for Sociology
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: FSAR
Prerequisite: SOCY100; and (MATH107 or MATH111).
Restriction: Must not have completed STAT400, BMGT231, or ENEE324.
Students will explore descriptive and inferential statistics. You will hone your quantitative analytical skills to construct impactful bivariate tables, craft frequency distributions, and decipher measures of central tendency and dispersion. Additionally, you will master the techniques of hypothesis testing, chi-square, ANOVA, and ordinary least squares regression, equipping you to seamlessly translate data into meaningful research insights.
SOCY202
Introduction to Research Methods in Sociology
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
Prerequisite: SOCY100.
We will examine why social research is needed, explore some of the main quantitative and qualitative techniques to conduct sociological research, and discover how to understand and critically evaluate sociological research on pressing social problems. Students will also learn to use specialized software to analyze and interpret quantitative data in the computer lab.
SOCY203
Sociological Theory
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: SOCY100.
Examines major trends in the history and development of sociological thought, including theories of inequality, the self, institutions, and more. With each theorist students will learn what sociologists assume and focus on when studying societies.
SOCY212
Hate Crimes in the U.S.: What Lt. Richard Collins III Can Teach Us About History, Hope and Healing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Rooted in the tragic murder of Lt. Richard W. Collins III, a Bowie State student, on the campus of the University of Maryland by a white supremacist student, this course will provide an overview and discussion of the history of bias-motivated violence in the United States, the development of modern hate crime laws, theories and impacts of victimization, domestic terrorism, legal and social responses, and prevention strategies. Students from both Bowie State University and the University of Maryland will engage with experts from multiple disciplines and work together in a collaborative community to generate actionable strategies.
Most class sessions will be held online. Some courses will be held in person at UMD. A precise schedule will be listed in advance.
SOCY224
Why are We Still Talking About Race?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Explore and discuss the major debates and assumptions that construct perceptions of race and how it matters. Sociological and social science theories will give students a historical and present day frame with which to view race and ethnic relations in the twenty-first century.
SOCY227
Introduction to the Study of Deviance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Credit only granted for: SOCY227 or SOCY327.
Formerly: SOCY327.
An introduction to the sociological study of deviant behavior, covering such topics as mental illness, sexual deviance, and the use of drugs.
SOCY230
Sociological Social Psychology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Why do people do that? Sitting at the nexus of sociology and psychology, this course surveys the various ways in which sociologists have answered this question. We investigate individuals-for example, how they develop and understand themselves in relation to others, how they choose to present themselves to the world, and how they form thoughts and opinions. And we study larger units of analyses, from small groups to the broader society. Topics covered include socialization, identity formation, social influence, group processes, how social processes shape individual behavior, and how human behavior shapes society.
SOCY241
Inequality in American Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: SOCY241 or SOCY441.
A broad-based overview of inequality in contemporary U.S. society, focusing on measuring patterns and trends over time. A series of learning modules familiarizes students with how inequality unfolds in relation to social stratification processes along the lines of race, gender, education and social class, income and wealth, and health.
SOCY245
The Family in Contemporary American Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP
Credit only granted for: SOCY243 or SOCY245.
This is a course in the sociology of the family as an institutional arena in the United States. Students will become familiar with the empirical patterns and trends, political and cultural debates, and policy issues concerning families - and the major theories and research methods used in the sociological study of the family. The readings include a textbook and a research monograph. To succeed, students will attend lectures and participate in discussion; complete quizzes and in-class writing assignments; and take a midterm and final exam.
SOCY277
Intersectionality and Illness: How do Overarching Social Inequalities Affect Health Outcomes?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: SOCY277 or SOCY302.
Formerly: SOCY302.
Students will examine the social determinants of disease: the relationship between socioeconomic status and health care access, as well as investigate the links between social status and disease chronicity. Students will further explore how health disparities, health resource distribution, and susceptibility disproportionately affect disadvantaged communities with chronic diseases.
SOCY325
The Sociology of Gender
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: 3 credits in SOCY courses.
Cross-listed with: WGSS325.
Credit only granted for: SOCY325, WMST325 or WGSS325.
Formerly: WMST325.
Institutional bases of gender roles and gender inequality, cultural perspectives on gender, gender socialization, feminism, and gender-role change. Emphasis on contemporary American society.
SOCY335
Sociology of Health and Illness
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP
An exploration of the social model to studying health and illness: how meanings and experiences of health and illness are socially produced. How experiences are shaped by the interaction of external social environments (culture, community) and the internal environment (human body), and by socio-demographic variables (race, class, gender, etc.). Disparities in health and healthcare delivery, medicalization of society, determinants of health, social construction of illness, and the social organization of health care.
SOCY340
Globalization's Winners and Losers
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
What is the relationship between globalization and inequality? This course examines the factors shaping both between-nation and within-nation household income inequality for the past century. It is divided into four parts, each considering a different factor. First we seek to understand global trade historically. Second, we examine the more recent phenomenon of outsourcing. Third, we examine welfare and taxation policy and its role in shaping domestic inequality. Finally, we analyze the mechanisms for the accumulation of capital within global finance. By the end of the course, students will be able to discuss globalization beyond the "is it good or bad" binary and understand the complex interaction between domestic politics and international trade.
SOCY378
(Perm Req)
Undergraduate Teaching Assistantship
Credits: 1 - 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Contact department for information to register for this course.
SOCY380
Honors Independent Reading in Sociology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Restriction: Permission of BSOS-Sociology department.
This course permits sociology honor students to undertake a program or reading on a particular problem in sociology or a subfield therein. The reading will be done under the supervision of a member of the sociology faculty. Required of sociology honor students.
SOCY381
(Perm Req)
Honors Independent Research in Sociology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: SOCY380.
This course permits sociology students to define a particular problem in sociology or a subfield therein and to develop a research plan for use as a thesis topic. The work will be done under the supervision of a member of the sociology faculty.
Contact department for information to register for this course.
SOCY383
(Perm Req)
Honors Thesis Research
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: SOCY381.
Student research under the direction of a member of the sociology faculty, culminating in the presentation and defense of a thesis reporting the research.
Contact department for information to register for this course.
SOCY386
(Perm Req)
Experiential Learning
Credits: 3 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
Restriction: Permission of BSOS-Sociology department; and junior standing or higher.
To register, students must have departmental permission form signed by instructor and by Coordinator of Sociology Undergraduate Program.
Contact department for information to register for this course.
SOCY399
(Perm Req)
Independent Study in Sociology
Credits: 1 - 6
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
No more than 6 hours of 399 is allowed for credit.
Contact department for information to register for this course.
SOCY410
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: 6 credits in SOCY courses; or permission of BSOS-Sociology department.
Types of demographic analysis; demographic data; population characteristics; migration; mortality; fertility; population theories; world population growth; population policy.
SOCY424
Sociology of Race Relations
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: 6 credits in SOCY courses; or permission of the Sociology department.
Cross-listed with: AAST424.
Credit only granted for: SOCY424 or AAST424.
Encourages sociological thinking about US racial and ethnic minority populations, with a focus on African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and Native Americans. The central concern is to understand and explain racial/ethnic inequality. A wide array of topics are discussed, including prejudice and discrimination, slavery, residential segregation, cultural inequality, skin tone stratification, economic and educational disparities, and assimilation/generational processes.
SOCY432
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: 6 credits in SOCY courses; or permission of BSOS-Sociology department.
This course broadens students' understanding of social movements in the United States. Many topics are discussed, including the emergence of social movements, why people join social movements, collective identity, gender, culture, emotions, tactics, repression, and the decline of social movements. Various movements are reviewed, including the civil rights movement, the Chicano movement, the women's movement, the LGBTQ movement, the white power movement, the American Indian movement, and the animal rights movement.
SOCY455
Social Dimensions of Privacy and Surveillance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: 6 credits in SOCY courses; or permission of the department.
Credit only granted for: SOCY391 or SOCY455.
Today, it is quite common in many spheres of life that we divulge personal information in exchange for something else. This course examines practices of surveillance in contemporary society in relationship to collective understandings of privacy. By the end of this course, students will be able to analyze privacy norms and practices in the age of mass surveillance, how surveillance produces inequalities in relation to privacy, and how definitions and regulations of privacy and surveillance change over time.
SOCY456
Smart Machines and Human Prospects
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: SOCY201 and SOCY202; or permission of the Sociology department.
Credit only granted for: SOCY416 or SOCY456.
Artificial intelligence is everywhere and never sleeps. It is transforming our social institutions in intended and unintended ways. While scientists debate the feasibility of engineering conscious machines with general intelligence, no one debates that the global race is on to create more potent computers. Through targeted research, discussion, and presentation of findings students will answer a specific question on how, where, and in what ways society is being changed by smart machines.
SOCY457
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Social, political, and cultural sources of legal norms and concepts; and how the law shapes society and society shapes the law using sociological theoretical frameworks. The role of social change, social reproduction and inequality (including race, class, gender, and sexuality) to achieve certain objectives such as compliance, deterrence and social control.
SOCY461
Sociology in Action: Research and Community Engagement in Prince George's County
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: SOCY202; or students who have taken courses with similar content may contact the department.
Sociology in Action is a research course that will use the science of sociology to inform real life issues and contribute to the development of social programs. In this course, students will gain hands-on experience in applying sociology by working with clients in Prince George's County on specific social problems and issues. Please assess your ability to commit to this course and fulfill all requirements. Given that students will be working with Prince George's County organizations, there will be some variation and unpredictability in the nature of the projects.
SOCY462
Digital Technology and Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: Must have completed 6 credits in SOCY courses; or permission of BSOS-Sociology department.
Situates digital technology in our social environment and then examines how this relationship reflects, reinforces, or reorders social hierarchies. Students will learn the conceptual and methodological foundations for studying and evaluating how technologies such as health and social media apps, the personal computer, artificial intelligence, and weapons of war have evolved, diffused and impacted social life. Students will explore and then conduct independent research on the relationship between technology and social inequalities through the lens of health and medicine, the environment and climate change, jobs and the workplace, as well as government and criminal justice.
SOCY465
The Sociology of War: State and Society since the American Revolution
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: Must have completed 6 credits in SOCY courses; or permission of BSOS-Sociology department.
Credit only granted for: SOCY465 or SOCY265.
Since the American and French Revolutions at the end of the eighteenth century, warfare has been marked by the way national states draw ordinary people into armed conflicts--as members of the military, producers and controllers of resources and supporters or resisters, and also as targets and victims. This course examines how the centering of ordinary people in war has transformed over time, continuing right up to the current conflict in Ukraine. Alongside explaining why states make war the way they do, the course explores the impacts of making war and living through conflict on the societies embroiled in it.
SOCY475
Sociology of Emotions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: 6 credits in SOCY courses; or permission of BSOS-Sociology Department.
Credit only granted for: SOCY498W or SOCY475.
Formerly: SOCY498W.
Emotions are often thought of as purely subjective experiences. How much more personal than one get than their emotions and feelings? In addition to their physiological and psychological aspects, however, emotions have a social side that often go unnoticed. This course will introduce you to the social aspects of emotions. In doing so, we will cover wide-ranging topics including the social causes of emotions, social norms about emotions, disparities in emotionalexperiences, and the ways in which emotions can maintain and reshape society.
SOCY480
Researching the Middle East
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: SOCY201 and SOCY202; or permission of the Sociology department.
Credit only granted for: SOCY498E or SOCY480.
Formerly: SOCY498E.
Introduces religion, gender, and politics in the Middle East and North Africa. After an overview of the political and social history the focus will be on methods for carrying out research on fundamental issues facing Middle Eastern societies, including national identity, religion, gender relations and the status of women in the family, politics, education, and labor market.
SOCY482
The Sociology of Ideology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: SOCY201 and SOCY202; or permission of the Sociology department.
This class introduces students to the Sociology of Ideology. It explains the relationship between social conditions and ideology. The class begins by defining such key concepts as ideas, beliefs, perceptions, values, attitudes, ideology, discourse, and other related concepts. Then, it discusses the variable forms of ideologies: political versus social, secular versus religious, moderate versus extremist, and totalitarian versus non-totalitarian ideologies. Next, given that the function of ideology revolves on the notion of thought process - that is, when we think, we employ ideas to represent the object of our thought or whatever we think about -- the key question is how ideas represent the object of one's thought. To answer this question, the class presents and critically evaluates various theories of ideologies in the classical sociological tradition - Marx, Durkheim, and Weber - and recent development in these theories. Finally, the class discusses different religious, secular, democratic, and totalitarian ideologies.
SOCY498X
Selected Topics in Sociology; The American Working Class
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
The 21st century has brought dramatic changes to the working class in the United States. Today's workers face a very different economy, politics, demography, and culture than the working class of themid-20th century. This course will review these changes; contrast them with the position of the American middle class; explore gender, racial, and geographic differences within these changes; and look to possible futures ahead.
SOCY601
(Perm Req)
Statistics For Sociological Research I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
Prerequisite: SOCY201; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Restriction: Permission of instructor.
Credit only granted for: SOCY601 and SURV601.
Introductory statistical concepts are covered including descriptive statistics, probability, sampling distributions, expected values, hypothesis testing, tests of significance, measures of association, and if time permits, introduction to regression analysis. Statistical programming software may be used.
SOCY610
Logic of Social Inquiry
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
Restriction: Restricted to Sociology graduate students.
Credit only granted for: SOCY699D or SOCY610.
Formerly: SOCY699D.
An introductory course on the fundamental issues that arise in the design, execution, analysis, and writing stages of the research process. The course is designed to help first-year graduate students begin their transition from a consumer to a producer of social research.
SOCY611
Introduction to Demographic Methods
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud, S-F
Survey of standard demographic methods for the description and analysis of population size, structure and composition, including techniques for the analysis of fertility, mortality and migration.
SOCY620
Development of European and American Sociological Theory
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
Prerequisite: SOCY203 or SOCY403; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department; or permission of instructor.
Review of the history of sociological thought with major attention to the key figures (from Marx to C. Wright Mills).
SOCY632
Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud, S-F
Restriction: Must be in Sociology (Doctoral) program; and permission of instructor.
An introductory course in qualitative research methods, intended to provide a general overview of the ways sociologists collect qualitative information about social phenomena, focusing on how to collect and anaylyze data that are reliable and applicable to our research questions. We will begin by constructing a research question that will drive our work for the entire semester. You will learn three of the main ways that qualitative data are used in sociological research: analysis of written material, participant observation, and open ended semi-structured interviews.
SOCY646
Public Image Management and Policy Solutions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs: Master of Professional Studies in Public Safety Leadership and Administration (MPLA); Criminology and Criminal Justice (Master's); Criminology and Criminal Justice (Doctoral); Sociology (Master's); Sociology (Doctoral); or permission from either the Sociology Department or Criminology & Criminal Justice Department.
Explores how to mitigate and solve image management problems that arise in organizations. Students will learn how to evaluate their organization, make recommendations for future development, and implement the practical aspects of the solution. Problems arise daily in organizations. Leaders need effective strategies to mitigate and solve these problems. While some problems are structural, daily problems often focus on social interactions among people. The course will focus on evaluating the source of problems, enhancing cultural competency among employees, restructuring and rebranding the organization, managing public image, and forming and implementing innovative policy solutions for long-term goals.
SOCY657
Constitutional Law and Public Safety
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs: Master of Professional Studies in Public Safety Leadership and Administration (MPLA); Criminology and Criminal Justice (Master's); Criminology and Criminal Justice (Doctoral); Sociology (Master's); Sociology (Doctoral); or permission from BSOS-Criminology & Criminal Justice department.
Introduces students to the constitutional issues inherent in the practice of policing. Particular emphasis is placed on issues pertaining to the 4th, 5th, and 6th Amendments.
SOCY660
Theories of Social Psychology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud, S-F
Prerequisite: Must have completed an undergraduate training in sociological research methods, statistics, and theory; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
An introduction to some of the theories in social psychology that are particularly useful to sociologists. Topics to be covered include theories of cognitive consistency, social exchange, symbolic interaction, role theory, group processes, and collective behavior.
SOCY675
Sociology of Emotions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
Reviews the sociological literature on emotion. We will cover wide-ranging topics including the social causes of emotions, social norms about emotions, disparities in emotional experiences, and the ways in which emotions can maintain and reshape society.
SOCY685
Sociology of Ideology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
This course introduces students to the world of ideas, their causes and consequences in the making of historical development. It discusses different conceptions of ideology, diverse sociological theories of ideological change, the differences between secular and religious ideologies, the relationship between ideas and social conditions, and the notion of ideological disorders -- extremism, fundamentalism, and national chauvinism and xenophobia.
SOCY699
Special Social Problems
Credits: 1 - 16
Grad Meth: Reg
Contact department for information to register for this course.
SOCY699C
Special Social Problems; Introduction to Computing for Sociologists
Credits: 1
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
SOCY799
(Perm Req)
Master's Thesis Research
Credits: 1 - 6
Grad Meth: S-F
Contact department for information to register for this course.
SOCY898
(Perm Req)
Pre-Candidacy Research
Credits: 1 - 8
Grad Meth: Reg
Contact department for information to register for this course.
SOCY899
(Perm Req)
Doctoral Dissertation Research
Credits: 6
Grad Meth: S-F
Contact department for information to register for this course.